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'SCOUTS OF THE WORLD 
■UILDIRO TOGETHER’ 


Di. Anderson Speaks on School 
Building Programs at Weeks PTA 



Boy Scout 
Week 


Capt. Eugene Legei 
Killed in Fire at 
Tinkham Field 

— o — 

Funeral services for Capt. 
Eugene Leger, technician in the 
U. S. Army Air Forces, who lost 
his life in the fire which destroy- 
ed the Air Force hangar at Tink- 
ham Field, Oklahoma on January 
28, were held Wednesday after- 
noon at 2 o’clock in the First 
Church in Newton, Newton Cen- 
tre. 

Capt. Leger was in his 26th 
year. He was a graduate of the 
Newton High School and of the 
University of Maine. 

He Is survived by his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene F. Leger 
of 47 Bothfeld road, Newton Cen- 
tre, his wife, Mrs. Constance 
Philbrook Leger, a six months’ 
old daughter, Constance Ann, 
and a sister, Barbara. 



Nearly 2,000,000 Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Senior Scouts 
WIl mark the 36th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America durinr 
f£? y S * cou f F 5f • 8th lo 14th< The theme of the celebration is 

Scouts of the World— Building Together.” Members of the Move- 
jment are helping brother Scouts throughout the world to reorganize. 

uSW^fll*****, F “ nd ” . of vo,unt ary contributions and 
their Shirts-OfT-Our-Backs ’ project of donating Scout Uniform 
parts and equipment, will assist Scouting overseas and help develop 
understanding among the boys of the world. Above is the official 
poster marking the event. * 


Boy Scouts Observe 36th 
Anniversary February 8-14 

"Record for Wartime Services 
Enviable” - President Truman 


President Truman, in a mes- 
sage to the Boy Scouts of Amer- 
ica on its thirty-sixth anniver- 
sary today (Friday) opening a 
nation-wide observance of Boy 
Scout Week, Feb. 8th to 14th, 
said that the ‘‘theme for the 
year, ‘Scouts of the World-Build- 
ing Together’ is timely, refresh- 
ing and appropriate.” 

In his message to the 1,977,463 
members of the Boy Scouts of 
America, of which he is Honor- 
ary President, Mr. Truman said, 
‘‘Your record for wartime serv- 
ices accomplished is enviable.” 

President Truman’s message, 
made public today by James 
Walton, the President of the Nor- 
umbega Council, Boy Scouts of 
America, follows: 

THE WHITE HOUSE 

Washington 

“To the Boy Scouts of America: 


Quantities May Be Lest BUT 
Quality Remains at the Same 
HIGH STANDARD 

Helen Cross Bakery 

ISext to Brigham's. IScictonville 

BIGolow 9341 



traded 

OVER CHARCOAL 
You'll >iko it at 

• SuttOH d tot AtldtOK • 


‘‘In a world that has suffered 
so grieviously from the most aw- 
ful war in history, your theme 
for the year, Scouts of the World 
— Building Togehter, is timely, 
refreshing and appropriate. 

‘‘Evidence of your determina- 
tion to help your fellow Scouts in 
other lands less fortunate than 
ours is worthy indeed of the Boy 
Scouts of America. Your record 
for wartime services accomplish- 
ed is enviable. Analyze it and 
you will find that planning, en- 
thusiasm and, above all, cooper- 
ation helped you win through in 
your various campaigns. 

"Now that hostilities have 
ceased you Scouts and your 
brother Scouts overseas can help 
the world maintain a secure 
peace by fostering good-will, un- 
derstanding, and respect through 
continued cooperation. 

"Good Scouts, good Scoutmas- 
ters and good Scouting! There 
is a real contribution to the new 
world now in the making. 

"Keep on Building Together in 
this, the thirty-seventh year of 
the Scout Movement in Ameri- 
ca, and all the years to come! 
(Signed) "HARRY S. TRUMAN” 


EXPERT 

RADIO 

REPAIRS 

Guaranteed Work 
Honest Prices 

Charlene’s Toyland 

Appliance Service Center 

Newton Corner 
BIGelow 9852 


How Rent 
Control Works 

— o — 

To save the people of the 
country from sky-rocketing rents 
—and to guard against inflation, 
Congress passed the Emergency 
Price Control Act in January 
1942. 

Under this act, Rent Control 
was recognized as an integral 
part of Price Control in keeping 
down the cost of living. Under 
the authority of the act, the OPA 
Administrator has the power to 
designate certain areas as "De- 
fense-Rental Areas” — and to rec- 
ommend that local groups and 
authorities take action to stabi- 
lize or reduce rents within these 
areas at a specified Maximum 
Rent Date. If local action is not 
taken within 60 days after recom- 
mendation, OPA may establish 
Federal Rent Control. As a gen- 
eral principle, rents must not be 
higher than the rents in effect 
on the Maximum Rent Date. 

Two types of Regulations have 
been issued by OPA. The Housing 
Regulation applies to houses, 
apartments, flats, and tenements 
— and tg quarters in private 
homes where the landlord rents 
to not more than two paying ten- 
ants. The Hotel and Rooming 
House Regulation applies to all 
rooms in hotels, boarding or 
rooming houses, and to auto and 
trailer camps. 

Under these provisions, by June 
(Continued on Page 3) 

Osteopathic Hospital 
Women's Association to 
Hold Dessert Bridge 

— O — 

The Women’s Association of 
the Massachusetts Osteopathic 
Hospital will hold it anuual des- 
sert bridge at the Hotel Ven- 
dome on Saturday, February 9, 
at 1:30 p.m. Tickets $1.25. 

The Newton Auxiliary of the 
Association will have charge of 
the food sale to be held after the 
bridge and will be under the co- 
chairmanship of Mrs. C. O. 
Mooney, Mrs. George Bicknell, 
and Mrs. Lulu G. Roberts. Oth- 
ers from Newton assisting at the 
bridge will be Mrs. A. F. Mc- 
Williams, Mrs. Myron B. Barslaw 
and Mrs. Helen Melvin. 


“Should Newton Have Two 
High Schools?’’ was the subject 
discussed by Dr. Homer Ander- 
son, Superintendent of Schools, 
and by Mr. Raymond Green, Prin- 
cipal of Newton High School, at 
the meeting of the Parent-Teach- 
er Association of the Weeks Jun- 
ior High School on Tuesday even- 
ing, February 5th Mr. A. Carl- 
ton Warren, President of the As- 
sociation, presided. Members of 
the local School Building Com- 
mittees as well as School Com- 
mittee members were present. 

Dr. Anderson presented his 
proposals for a school building, , . . . 

program which will give Newton vil,p ’ ' , '« P>'es.dent and sales 
an adequate school plant in the I manaK ‘“'' ° f William Filene’s 
immediate future as well as for ! £° rn . P . a " y, „ d L C , d ° n W^hies- 
years to come. He showed, with 
maps and diagrams, Newton’s 


The Newton Graphic 


NEWTON’S LEADING NEWSPAPER - ESTABLISHED 1872 


VOL. LXXIII. No. 19. 

William H. McLeod 
Filene Executive Dies 

— o — 

| William Harrison McLeod of 
r 1 25 Lakeview avenue, Newton 


NEWTON, MASS., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 


Single Copies 5c; $2.50 per Year 


ultimate need for five Junior 
High Schools, some of them re- 
located freeing the Weeks Jun- 


day, February 6, of an embolism 
following an operation. 

Mr. McLeod was in his 58tli 
year, and had been associated 


Lt. Col. Loomis 
Patrick Home on 
Terminal Leave 

— o — 

Lt. Col. Loomis Patrick, JAGD, 
of 64 Putnam street, West New- 
ton, has recently returned from 
Tokyo, and is now on terminal 
leave. Col. Patrick left his scat 
in the Massachusetts House of 
Representatives to accept a com- 


Aldermen Confirm Appointments 
Of Messrs. Lee and Holden 

Reject Petition for Use of Sound Truck 


Holy Name Society to 
Sponsor "Police Night" 


... , . , mission as Captain in the U. S. 

with Filene s for nearly 41 years. Army. For three vears he has x 

lor High School building for use He first joined the firm in May been attached to the Military meeting 

as a second Senior High school 17, 1905 as a stenographer and Government Section of the Army, .... 

to serve the growing southern 40 years later on the same date and has performed military gov’ 

section of Newton. He pointed was an honor guest of more ernment functions in two thea- 

than 200 of the store’s employees tres, in Europe, in Sicily, and in 
at an anniversary celebration. the Pacific in both the Philip- 
Hc was well known for his lec- pines and Japan. He was also 
tures on retail advertising and an instructor in the School of Mil- 
had been an instructor in that itary Government at Charlottes- 
( Continued on Page 3) 


out that the two High Schools 
would relieve much traffic con- 
gestion in Newtonville. 

Mr. Green then presented the 
question from another point of 

(Continued on Page 2) 


(Continued on Page 3) 


The Newton Board of Aider- 
men on Monday night voted un- 
animously to confirm the appoint- 
" o ment of Richard H. Lee as an 

St. Bernard's Holy Name So- associate member of the Board 
ciety will sponsor a "Police ' of Appeal, Building Laws, also 
Night” at their next monthly the re-appointment of Sydney B. 

to he held on Wednes- Holden as a member of the Board 
•vening, February 13. 1946. of Assess* 
at 8 P.M.. at the Newton Cath- The appointment of Harold F. 
olic Club, West Newton. Young as street commissioner, 

Many prominent men in pol- submitted to the Board at the 
ice work will speak, and it pro- previous meeting, was again laid 
mises an evening of much inter- on the table. Also laid on the 
est. There will also be enter- table, in accordance with the 
tainment. anl refreshments will rules, was the appointment of 


be served. 


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The Perfect Valentine 

A 

fs acute ^Arrangement 

77 Walnut Street, Newtonville — BIGelow 0600 

MEMBER OF THE F. X- 0. A. 

We Can Telegraph Your Order Anywhere 


Mme. Liu Ching Tung 
Speaker Federation, 

Forum, Auburndale 

— o — 

The Massachusetts State Fed- i 
eration of Women’s Clubs, Mrs. 

Edwin Troland, President, will 
hold a Club Institute-Forum 
meeting at the Auburndale Wom- 
en’s Club House at 2:00 P. M., 

Tuesday, February 12, 1946, with 
Mme. Liu Ching Tung, former 
Professor Swarthmore College, 
as the principal speaker. The 
program is as follows: 

2:00 P. M. Opening — Pledge of 
Allegiance to the Flag— "Star 
Spangled Banner.” 

2:10 P M. Welcome by Mrs. 

Eric J. Kermath, President Au- 
burndale Woman’s Club. 

2:15 P. M. Greetings — Mrs. 

Arthur W. Cornell, Director 
Twelfth District. 

2:20 Greetings from the Feder- 
ation, Mrs. Harvey E. Green- 
(Continued on Page 8) 

Newton league oi Women 
Voters Works for 
Price Control 

— O — 

The telephone squad of the 
Newton League went into action 
when Price Control was threat- 
toned. Many telegrams , were 
sent to the President urging him 
to hold the line on prices in the 
belief that if price controls were 
relaxed, inflation would follow. 

The League is confident that 
the OPA will authorize any in- 
creases necessary to permit Bus- 
iness to operate at a reasonable 
profit. Any large scale relaxa- 
tion which would result in in- m | 
creased prices to the consumer I “O IUI vOipUIdl 

A great cross section of pub- And Mrs. Abbott 

lie thinking is represented in the 
League of Women Voters. It is 
a truly democratic, non partisan 
organization working at Nation- 
al, State, and City levels for the 
common good of all. 

The League employs a vari- 
ety of means to arouse civil 
awareness, and to create public 
understanding and discussion of 
important political issues. 

A Contributions Campaign is 
being organized to further these 
activities in Newton, under the 
chairmanship of Mrs. John L. 

MacNeil of 252 Franklin street. 

Contributions are invited from 
all who consider the League's 
work to be of significant value 
to the success of democracy in 
the United States. 



(Photo by Burton Woodward) 

CAST OF "YOURS TRULY." a modern comedy to be presented Thursday. February 21, 
at Whitney Hall, Coolidge Corner, Brookline, by the "15" Up Club of the Temple Emanuel, 
Newton. Left to right, top row: Alvin Wolf son, Peter Eskin, Robert Frank of N.H.S. Senior 
Play fame; Robert Hoffman, and Richard Simmons of the U.S.O.; bottom, P.onr.ie Gold- 
man, Norma Fried, Rosalie Flayderman, Elaine Robbins, and Irma Marcus. 


Welcome Home 


Dorothy Ell Now 
Lt. Comdr., Waves 


PICTURES FRAMED 
MIRRORS RESILVERED 
BROKEN GLASS REPLACED 

NEWTON GLASS CO. 

302 Centre Street, Newton 
BIGelow 1268 


INTERIOR and EXTERIOR j 

PAINTING 

and 

PAPERHANGING 
John R. DAY & Son 

85 Mapie St., Needham |] 
Needham 1593 ll 


— o — 

Dorothy Ell, daughter of Pres. 
— o — Carl S. Ell of Northeastern Uni- 

A Welcome Home tea was giv- ' versity and Mrs. Ell has been pro- 
en Sunday afternoon at the home moted from Heutenant to lieuten 
of Dr. and Mrs. George N. Ab 


bott of 161 Walnut street. New- 
tonville in honor of their son, 
Corp. Donald G. Abbott and his 
wife. 

Corp. Abbott recently returned 
from overseas where as mortar 
gunner with the 311th Infantry, 
78th Division, in the European 
theater and Germany, later serv. 
ing as interpreter for the colonel 
of the regiment. In addition to 


the usual service ribbons he an ensign alter completion 

wears the Unit Citation Badge of the course at the Smith College 
and cluster for the capture of Candidate Training School and 

• a . r. rtAnata. irMOncd n limiTfltlhnr 3* 

the dams and the Remagen 
Bridge. 


ant commander of the Waves, the 
First Naval District has announc- 
ed. Lt. Com. Ell. a graduate of bership committee Ot the Bui ns- 
DePauw University has been Kerr Post 333. American Legion 
District Passenger Transporta- at the home of Mrs. Louisa Hen- 
tion officer in Boston in charge of 
railway and air reservation ar- 
rangements for Navy personnel 
and troop movements since Sept. 

1945. 

She was inducted into the sen- 
ice Oct 6, 1942, was commission- 


Willard S. Pratt as city engineer, 
submitted to the Board by Mayor 
Goddard at Monday night's meet- 
ing. 

The Board rejected a petition 
of Ralph A. Robert, a coordina- 
tor of organizations for the In- 
ternational Ladies' Garment 
Workers Association for a per- 
mit to use a sound truck in New- 
ton on Feb. 6 and 13 to advance 
the interests of the strikers at 
the \ anta Company, one depart- 
(Continued on Page 3) 

— o 

Annual Meeting of 
Newton-Wellesley 
Hospital Feb. 14 

A meeting in lieu of the annual 
meeting of Newton-Wellesley 
Hospital is to be held Thursday 
afternoon, February 14 at 4:45 
p. m. at the Nurses Home, to be 
followed by the usual meeting of 
the Board of Trustees and dinner. 

At this meeting there will be 
the election of new members to 
the corporation and of trustees 
(Continued on Page 5) 
o 

Newton Lieut., 24 
Mos. Overseas, 
Furloughs at Home 

Lieutenant Fred VV. Burns Jr* 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. 
Burns. 152 Washington stret, 
Newton, returned home recently, 
after two years overseas, antici- 
pating the comforts and enjoy* 
ment of a long stay at home, only 
to find orders awaiting him, di- 
recting he immediately report to 
Fort Lauderdale. Florida. A 
“hello” and “goodbye” furlough 
sufficing for the “long stay at 
home.” Lt. Burns is now enroute 
to camp. 

Another warrior In the Fred 
Burns family. Lt. H. Phyllis 
Burns, a nurse attached to the 
9Sth General Hospital, now in 
Mulch. Germany, has been over- 
seas IS months, serving in Eng- 
land. France and Germany. 

Fred W. Burns Sr., father of 
ley Fordyce. 2262 Washington two lieutenants, recently ob- 
street, Newton Lower Falls. tained his discharge from the 
A talk was given by Command Coast Guard Reserve and be- 
er Edward J^ McPhee who out cause of his 11.000 hours service 
lined the benefits to be derived without pay. was made an en* 
from joining the Post. sign at that time. 


Burns-Kerr Post 
Gives Tea for 
Service Women 


A tea at which service women 
of World War II were guests was 
held Friday evening by the mem 


was commissioned a lieutenant at 
the Great Lakes Naval Training 
r At ge t' he time he entered the ' Station where she did personnel 

" - ye a a n rs PO Th a eEil.s iTat ’ 


at Tufts College 
resume his studies next month. 


21 Beau- 


mont avenue, Newtonville. 


Dr. Charles H. Veo 

(D M D , HARVARD UNIV.l 

DENTAL SURGEON 

Registered in Massachusetts. 
Maine and London, England 

Also 

MEMBER of 

AMERICAN DENTAL ASSN 


M 


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Stationers 

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Again . . . 

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WHO WILL SETTLE 
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Personal 


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consider a relat ve or friend as Executor, 
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• 

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PAGE TWO 


]' M L NEWTON GRAPHIC 


A UhliMtfll A « 


A uVlIViio • 


The Newton Graphic 

(Consolidated With Which Is The Town Crier) 
"Newton’s Leading and Oldest Newspaper” 
Fstablished 1872 
Published Weekly on Thursday* 


Office 11 Centre Avenue. Newton — P. 0. Building 
Mail Address: Box 206. Newton 68. Massachusetts 
Telephone LASell 4.154 


John W. Fielding, Manager 


PHILIP 0. AHLIN 
Editor and Advertising Manager 


Entered as second-class mail matter at the post oflica at 
Boston. Mass., under the Act of March 8. 1879 


Scouts of the World - Building Together 

The hopes of World Peace for the next fifty years depends 
upon what happens in t lie lives of boys growing tip here in Am- 
erica and in the countries of Europe. 

Boy Scout Week, February 8-14. marks the 36th Anniversary 
of the founding of the Movement in America. 

The theme of the Boy Scouts of America for the year 1916 
is ‘‘Scout? of the World — Building Together.” Regardless of 
what treaties or agreements may be made by the Nations of the 
World, in the last analysis, what happens to our hope? of World 
Peace for the next fifty years depends upon what happens in the 
lives of boys growing up here in America and in the countries of 
Europe. If we ran impress upon these boys principles of friend- 
liness and mutual respect, we shall go a long way toward estab- 
lishing a better understanding among the Nations of the World. 
Here in America we have nearly two million members of the 
Boy Scouts of America. Throughout the World there are ap- 
proximately three million Scouts and Leaders. In Norumbega 
Council, serving Newton and Wellesley, there are about 2800 
men and boys enrolled in Scouting — the greatest membership 
since Norumbega Council was incorporated in 1924. The local 
Council has a splendid record of continued progress through the 
years, and the high standards established for our Newton-Welles- 
ley boys have been consistently maintained. 

The Scout Program seeks to train these boys for service to 
others and useful citizenship. With these millions of Scouts 
throughout the World, we believe something truly magnificent 
can be done. The Scouts and Senior Scouts of Norumbega Coun- 
cil will join with the other Scouts of America in taking part in 
‘‘Shirts-Off-Our-Back Campaign” beginning today and continu- 
ing until March 15, when uniforms. Scouting and Camping equip- 
ment will be gathered here in Newton and Wellesley and shipped 
all over the world to Scouts of other lands in Countries ravaged 
by the war. 


Color 


Dr. Anderson 

(Continued from Pape 1) 

view, that of the possible need 
for added High School facilities 
if Newton should decide to adopt 
a program of post graduate edu- 
cation. He called parents' atten- 
tion to the fact that acceptance 
into colleges Is becoming increas- 
ingly difficult for all but the high- 
est ranking students owing to the 
groat numbers of returning vet- 
erans seeking higher education. 
In the past Newton has sent 
52-6391' of its graduates on to 
higher education. With limited 
opportunities, some provision 
must be made locally to give 
these students the advantages 


(The opinion* expressed in this 
column are the t rriter’e own. and 
do not necessarily reflect the views 
or policy of this newspaper. — Edi- 
tor's Note). 

Chairman Brownell 

The prediction made in Detroit 
on Feb. 2 leave me somewhat 
aghast. Chairman Brownell of 
the Republican National Com- 

mlttop is reported to have said 1 1 hoy seek.' M r .Green futher point- 
that "if conditions improve as e d out that the age for employ- 
much in the next sixty days as ■ mont is bein( , ,-aiscd, leaving 
they have in the past two | many H(gh Sc hool graduates 
months, the party will take both with a year or two of time be- 
houses of Congress this fall." tween graduation and employ- 
Just what he means by the 1m- j mpn t age. The school must bridge 
provement of conditions is a this gap. 

mystery to me. unless, of course, I No decisions have been reached 
he refers entirely to the inside 1 as to the best way of meeting 
political developments in Wash- these problems. Mr. Green, eni- 
ington and to the growing un- phasized, but a plan under con- 
easiness of the people as a whole sideration calls for the offering 
rl the strike situation continues | of one or possibly two years of 
to gradually paralyze the na- post -graduate work by the High 
tion’s industry. i School. In this period a High 

Frankly, I doubt if the average j School graduate might take a 
citizen circs whether or not the , ° f Y™* ° n “ lle S e level 

G.O.P. is on the way up to pow- wi ? le waiting acceptance into 
or again. He is interested chiefly specialized business or 

see to it ^ cc “ nica ^ training; or a year of 
enriched study with many cours- 


Letter to the Editor 

— O — 

Dear Sir: 

In numerous places through- 
out the Newtons there are signs 
of industrial and business ex- 
pansion. Cellar holes have been 
dug for new* buildings and in 
the spring there will appear 
new places of business where 
formerly trees and grass were 
growing. If we are to preserve 
Newton’s reputation as “The 
Garden City” steps must be 
taken right away to set aside 
desirable land for park purposes 
as was suggested in a letter to 
the editor in your January 31st 
issue. 

Realizing the effect which the 
post war burst of energy would 
have on the life of Newton Cen- 
tre. the Improvement Associa- 
tion of the village long ago 
championed the plan to save a 
piece of property on the shores 
of Crystal Lake for recreation- 
al purposes. The property lo- 
cated between the lake and Cen- 
tre street and between Norwood 
avenue and the railroad tracks 
of the Highland Branch had been 
occupied bv an ice house. After 
it burned to the ground a pile 
of rubbish was left for years 
and still remains as an eye sore 
and symbal of neglect. A few 
years ago a change of zoning 
was urged and was passed so 
that this property was converted 
from the industrial zone to Gen- 
eral Residence. This was a 
primary step backed by numer- 
ous citizens who did not want 
to see any portion of the lake 


shores used for commercial pur- 
poses. 

Recently a petition was pre- 
sented to the Mayor and the 
Board of Aldermen, as your pap- 
er has already reported, re- 
questing that the property be 
purchased by the city for a park. 
While there were approximately 
two hundred signatures on the 
petition, it was evident to those 
| obtaining endorsements that 
many more people were in favor 
i of the project than could be seen 
in the time permitted. There is 
; a strong feeling both in New- 
ton Centre and in Newton High- 
lands to preserve the shores of 
Crystal Lake for the benefit 
and enjoyment of the citizens. 
The present city-owned bath 
and skating house on the lake 
is one of the most popular and 
beneficial of the recreational 
centers in all of the Newtons. 
The taking of the ice house pro- 
perty would expand these facili- 
ties in proportion to the growth 
of the city. 

It is important for the Board 
of Aldermen to act now before 
the commercial expansion of the 
city swallows up forever this 
opportunity to preserve a spot 
of natural beauty. 

Very truly yours, 
PAUL H. PIERCE 


— o 


The safest distance at which to 
follow another car is one car 
length for each 10 miles of speed, 
says the National Safety Council. 
At 30 miles an hour, for example, 
the safe “following" distance 
would be three car-lengths. 


PARAMOUNT 

NEWTON CORSE* 

LASell 4180 


Ststij.i y-Mot.duv-Ti.t- .day-Wednesdny 
4 DAYS • February 10-11-12-13 
Hrttv Hutton — Harry Fitzgerald 

“The Stork Club” 

George Sanders — Geraldine Fllsgerald 

"UNCLE HARRY" 


Tfi :r • b y-Fr!day -Saturday 

s DAYS February U-15-16 
Barry Fitzgerald — Walter Hu»lon 

“And Then There 
Were None” 

Gale Storui — Phil Regan 

"SUNBONNET SUE" 

Saturday Matinee — Serial 

"The Phantom Rider" 


WEST NEWTON 

WEST NEWTON SOI \RB 

LASell 3540 


Sun. thru Tues. Feb. 1012 
Alice Faye • Dana Andrews 

“FALLEN ANGEL” 

— Also— 

Alan Curtis ♦ Kent Taylor 

“DALTONS RIDE AGAIN” 


Wed. thru Sat. Feb. 13 16 

Paul Henri. -d 
Maureen O'llitra 

“SPANISH MAIN” 

— Also — 

Allan Jones 

‘Senorita From The West" 


Matlneei. 1 30 — Evening, 7.1S 

Continuous Sunday* and Ho. .day* 


a 

ft' - 

r [ Corsages - But] u ets 

L,'jev. RIGGS FLOWER SHOP 

2098 Commonwealth A*«., 

"Hw Auburndale 

BIGelow 1271 


wf 


in 1 \ ving somebody 
that this country gets back on 
the reconversion trail and gets 
there pronto. If President Tru- 
man and the Democrats can do 
it, well and good; if they cannot, 
then let’s put somebody in 
charge who can and will. In the 
meantime, the thinking voter 
wants to know JUST WHAT the 
Republicans will do if they se- 
cure control of tjie House of 
Representatives this fall. Brown- 
ell must know better than most 
of us that it will be practically 
impossible for the G.O.P. to cap- 
ture the Senate as well. And let 
us not forget that the U. S. Sen- 
ate, like the State Senate here, 
is frequently the graveyard of 
much worthwhile legislation. In 
other words, if one party cot> 
trols the Presidency and the 
Senate, the p^rty in control of 
the House is caught in the mid- 
dle and is relatively impotent. 
They can initiate legislation, to 
be sure, and they can also do 
their best to block it, BUT, they 
cannot actually secure the pas- 
sage of any bill, regardless of 
! its importance. 

Now, from a strict party stand- 
j point. G.O.P. naturally wants to 
make a beginning in its climb 
back to power. The House is the 
obvious place to start. Also, 
only 27 votes are needed to 
1 switch control of this body away 
| from the administration. Furth- 
! ermore, past records indicate 
that a turnover in Congress in a 
| by-election year dike 1946 is apt 
to mean a turnover in the Presi- 
' dency at the next regular elec- 
tion year. So, watch closely for 
I inside developments in the com- 
I ing 
ever 

will be talking with their tong- 
ues in their cheeks. Being hu- 
man. they cannot help worrying 
a little about their chances of re- 
election. Again, with labor in 
the saddle and with the White 
House doiqg very little to push 
it off the saddle, we cannot ex- 
pect the average Congressman to 
be too noble and unselfish. 

Judge Swift 

It has been my pleasure to 
know Judge Swift, the storm- 
centre of the recent UNO debate 
on the problem of a site, for 
many years. A fairer and squar- 
or gentleman never lived. It 
pains me to have any member 
of the United Nations Organiza- 
ton take such a wicked paste at 
the Judge, whose chief offense 
appears to be that he made a 
frank and honest speech before 
a religious organization on Jan. 
20 in Boston. We Americans be- 
lieve in free speech and Judge 
Swift is a very typical American. 
Furthermore, he is one of the 
leading Catholic laymen in the 
country and it is only natural 
that he 

Russian attitude ‘toward the 
Catholic church. Just why should 


65 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 0, 1891 

— o — 

If that new truck comes, New- 
ton will have about all of that 
class of fire apparatus that will 
be needed for some years. 

— o — 

Is West Newton to lose a part 
of itself? There is a petition 
before the Legislature for an- 
nexation to Waltham of that 
section of West Newton terri- 
tory adjacent to the bleachery. 
— o — 

The city fathers have voted to 
occupy a neutral position in ref- 
erence to the annexation of the 
More Field territory and to op- 
pose by representative any pay- 
ment of purchase money for the 
land in question. 

— o — 

The City Hall will not be let 
hereafter days, as it is to be 
utilized by the city engineer and 
staff. When let nights it will 
cost more than of yore, for the 
expense of moving tables and 
furniture must be added to the 
former price, which, by the way, 
was extremely small considering 
the amount charged for halls in 
other parts of the city. 


50 Years Ago 
Newton Graphic, Feb. 7, 


1896 


es which he could not pursue 
while an undergraduate. If such 
a post graduate course should be 
offered, the facilities of the pres- 
ent High School building might 
be over taxed since 3000 students 
is the limit for the present plant. 

For many reasons, Mr. Green 
feels, a second High School would 
be prefereable to enlarging the 
old High School. A school larger 
than 3000 presents difficutl ad- . Elliott factory and will move his 
ministrative problems and tends plant ol ,t f r0 m Boston 
to submerge individual person- 
alities. 

A Discussion period followed 
with parents urged to express 
themselves so that the trend of 
public opinion on this subject 
may be felt. 


Mr. W. D. Gower, manufact- 
urer of electric lamps, switches, 
j etc., has bought the old Sterling 


The work in the cooking class- 
es goes bravely on, the first 
years class having had Feb. 1, 
a lesson on “Quick Doughs,” 
while the second year class have, 
on Saturday, the mysteries of 
baking and roasting made clear 


Judge Swift stand silently by | To "them7"From"L'seli^ notes 
while some Russian blasts away 
at Archbishop Spellman, the 
Vatican and the Catholic church 
as a whole? As I frequently sug- 
gest, what is sauce for the goose 


Rev. F. D. Whitman has ac- 
cepted a call to the pastorate 
of the Park Street Baptist church 


is sauce for the gander. It seems ! South Framingham. Rev. Mr. 
ridiculous to have a prominent Whitman has filled pastorates 
Russian announce that he will * at Newton Upper Falls, and All- 
vote against ANY Massachusetts I ston and for many years was 
site for the UNO headquarters 
simply because Judge Swift re 


served the right to talk out loud. 
However, it is possible that we 
may gain something from this 
unpleasant experience. It points 
up with great clarity one of the 
chief difficulties we will always 
have in our dealings with the 
Russians. Decades of misunder- 
standing, suspicion and offlsh- 
ness because two great nations 
cannot be bridged by the mere 
creation of a UNO. Let us re- 
member that and be patient and 
months. Remember, how- , understanding of our great ally, 
that many Congressmen Mayor CuJ , ey 

How much longer will It be 
Mayor Corley? Just what hap- 
pens if and when he starts serv- 
ing a sentence? Will the Federal 
Judge let him off provided that 
he resigns as Mayor? What in- 
fluence did all this have on the 
UNO site -picking delegation? 
Quite a bit, I should imagine. 

Weekly Quiz 

Answering last week’s quiz; — 
Landon carried only two states 
in 1936 (Maine and Vermont); 
the late Wendell L. Wilkie car- 
ried ten states in 1940 and Gov. 
Dewey of New York carried 
twelve states in 1944. 

This week’s question is; Name 
the American statesman who 
failed in business, was defeated 
for the Legislature, failed in 
business again, was elected to 
the Legislature, had a nervous 
breakdown, was defeated for 
Speaker, defeated for Elector, 
defeated for Congress, then elec- 
ted to Congress, defeated lor re- 
election, defeated for the U. S. 
Senate, defeated for Vice-Presi- 
dent, defeated again for the Son- 
hould resent the typical , al( , and TH e.M was elected Presl- 
dent of the United Stales. 

p.w.c. 


charge of the English Speak- 
ing church at Rangoon, Burma. 

— o — 

Telegraph poles are being plac- 
ed on Boylston street for the I 
new line between Boston and j 
Worcester. Newton Upper Falls | 
item. 

— o — 

25 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 4, 1921 

— o — 

Last Sunday Rev. Francis E. 
Clark, DD, LLD, Founder of the 
Christian Endeavor Society and 
President of the Society, spoke 
at Eliot Church in celebration of 
its 40th anniversary. 

We are sorry to note a grow- 
ing tendency to ignore and belit- 
tle the veterans of the great 
war, now that its echoes are 
becoming less and less noticable. 
Three yeaVs ago, there was no- 
thing too good for the young men 
who enlisted in the army and 
navy of our country. Legisla- 
tion in their interests was passed 
by unanimous vote. Now, even 
minor efforts to equalize that 
hurried legislation is opposed 
chiefly on the ground that the 
early legislation was a mistake 
and further legislation on those 
lines ought not to be encouraged. 
Let us not forget that we still 
owe these boys more than we 
can ever repay and see to it 
that they receive their just dues, 
so far as the city and state can 
go in that direction. Editorial. 

— o — 

Mr. James J. Feerlck, post- 
office clerk, has been promoted 
to the position of superintend- 
ent at the Auburndale postof- 
fice to succeed Miss Jennie Mar- 
I tin, who has recently retired. 


What Price Houses 
For War Veterans? 

| To the Editor: 

Last Friday night in his radio 
talk A. H. Blackington most in- 
terestingly sketched the story of 
Henry D. Thoreau’s 12x18 foot 
cabin with commanding view, 
built by the philosopher in 1845 
on the shores of Lake Walden. 
The cost, for material was $28 
and odd cents. Thoreau did all the 
labor of construction, and lived In 
the cabin for two years. 

Nowadays in Newton and else- 
where much talk prevails about 
house shortage. Married World 
War II Veterans (and others) are 
feeling the lack of a rooftree. We 
have heard sketchy suggestions 
In Newton, advanced for building 
habitable houses to cost from j 
$5000 to $10,000 above the cost of 
land, with a lot of land, priced 
anywhere from $1000 to $3000 a 
builder might advise about how 
much house you could expect for 
$4000 or $7000. 

Concretely what proposition 
can be offered a prospective 
house hunter in the present state 
of affairs that he can sensibly 
obligate himself to assume? 

Wages are rising, but so,4oo, Is 
the cost of living. It is generally 
agreed that (yearly basis) a 
month’s rent should not absorb 
more than one week’s pay check. 
What the average week’s pay 
(yearly basis) today or maybe a 
year from now is a guess mostly 
—"take home pay” some call it. 
Say the majority of family men 
“draw down” from $25 to $40, 
the minority may go beyond to 
$50, $60— and sometimes a little 
more. Whether a man owns his 
house or pays rent the outgo is 
almost the same. In general every 
dollar paid for a month’s rent 
represents $100 in real estate 
value (basis figure in sales). 
Thus $40 a month stands for the 
return expected on a $4000 house 
and grounds; $50, for $5000; $60, 
$80, $100, respectively, on $5000, 
$6000, $8000, and $10,000. A long, 
long way in 100 years from 
Thoreau's $28 and odd cents 
cabin. What price house for to- 
day? 

We are told that a glorious 
future on earth awaits us— who i 
shall say to the contrary? The j 
housing problem is tied up with 
the glorious future. In the words 
of President Cleveland, in period 
around ’88 in discussing a very j 
serious problem of state declared . 
"It is a condition, not a theory j 
that confronts us." Let Newton 
get down to "brass tacks.” 

John Temperley, 

85 Thurston road, 

[ Newton Upper Falls. 


Lt. Comdr. Bruce 
Navy Dischargee 

Lt. Comdr. Norman H. Bruce 
of 22 Maple street, Auburndale 
was recently released from ac- 
tive duty in the U. S. Naval Med- 
ical Corps. Following his en- 
listment in 1942, he served at the 
Brooklyn Naval Hospital for a 
short period and was hen as- 
signed as senior medical officer 
of the 56th Naval Construction 


Battalion. After a period of duty 
in the Hawaiian Islands, this Sea- 
Bee unit took part in the libera- 
tion of Guam. After 23 months 
of overseas duty, Dr. Bruce was 
returned to the U. S. In early 
1945 and reported for duty at the 
U. S. Naval Hospital at Sampson, 
N. Y., where he served on the 
surgical staff until the time of 
his release. He plans to resume 
practice in Auburndale in the 
near future. 


ARTIFICIAL TEETH 
REPAIRED ”SeXS 

BY EXPERT8 

7* OTIS STREET — NEWTONVILLE 

BIGelow 7033 


HARRY K. HOLLIS 

INSURANCE 

OF ALL KINDS 

00 CONGRESS STREET — BOSTON 
Tel. HCRbard BB20 

Rvenlnci LASell 1464 


EMERSON FASHIONS 

NATIONAL BRANDS OF 
APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES 
For Women and Children 
299 WALNUT STREET, NEWTONVILLE 
YARNS 

Kernnt 

SPORTSWEAR 

Eclipse Cronies nnc! Chums 
Cnrlnml Sweaters 
Little Miss English Sweaters 
Petti Suits and Skirts 
Glcnwcor Blouses 
Hcrlestun Blouses 
Station Wagon Raincoat 

DRESSES 

Petti 

Joan Miller 
Pat Hartley 
Jonathan Logan 
Abbey Kent 


HOSIERY 

(When Available) 

Van Ranlte 

Phoenix 

Merrill 

Woodland 

Cannon 

GLOVES 

Van Raalte 
Wear Right 

LINGERIE 

Van Raalte 

Seampmfe 

Corette 

Perlerest 

Princess 

GIRDLES and BRASSIERES 

Nemo 

Maidenform 

INFANTS' WEAR 
and TOYS 

Baby Joy Dresses 
Philippine Style Dresses 
Tony Snrg Baby Books 
Play Suits 
Training Pants 
Baby Shoes 
Bunny Slippers 


Betty Blaine 
Tailor Town 

SHOES 

Snndler Sportster Scout 
Shoe for Girls 
Dog Ears 
Loafers 

Daniel Green Slipper 
Saddlcniastcrs 
Children'* School Shoes 

COSMETICS 

Mntchahelli 
Rex Comparts 


STYLE APPAREL AT MODERATE PRICES 


MARTIN’S TAILORING and CLEANING 

EXPERT DRY CLEANING, REPAIRING and ALTERATIONS 

93 Wyman St., Waban - Tel. DEC. 8870 

Next ot Waban Post Office 

We are open for business to give the residents of Waban 
expert dry cleaning, repairing and alteration service. 

Our driver will call at your house on request. We would con- 
sider it a privilege for us to look after your cleansing and 
tailoring needs. 

A Cordial Invitation It Extended to You to Visit Our Shop 


PIANO TUNING 

New Cutlomrri Please Place Order* 
Nov* for March Srheilulr 
Regular Customers Phone Now 
Heavy List Walling 

John W. Tapper 

LASell 1300 


First Church of 
Christ, Scientist 
of Newton 

391 Walnut Street 
Ncwtonville 

SERVICES 

Sunday 10:45 A.M 

Sunday School 10:45 A M 

Wodno*dnv Evening ...8:00 P.M 

READING ROOM 
287 Walnut St.. Newtonville 
Open Daily All Welcome 
Weekdays, except Wednes- 
days and llolidayp .. 9 to 0 

Wednesdays 9 to 7:80 

'-'unduys and Holidays. .. 2 to 5 
riee Leiulins Llbrari include* me ttiuie 
'gins Jamss teraiunt. all Ihe ■rlllns* 
9l Man Basel Eddy *nd ne» suUten- 
He Biographies 


FOR PEAK ECONOMY 
AND SAVINGS... 


Suy t&e 

BURNER ANO 
FUEL OIL 

that will give you the most eco- 
nomical performance with your 
furnace. 


EXPERT . 
BURNER SERVICE 

malntutuu peak efficiency at all 
time* and lukes heiillng worrte* 
off your hands. Find out more 
about this) 

Call COMmonwealth 3400 
LAS 0328 

PETROLEUM HEAT 
& POWER COMPANY 

419 Boylston St Boston 


STONE INSTITUTE and 
NEWTON HOME for 
AGED PEOPLE 

177 Ellul St.. Newton Upper Pall*. 

Newton. Mai*. 

ThI* Horn* l* entirety «upported by 
the gtmiToMly ot Newton citizens and 
wo solicit fund' for endowment and 
enlargement ot th* Horn*. 

DIRECTORS 
Mm. Arthur M. Allan 
Mrs (Jeurgo W Bartlett 
Mr* Btanley Hotter 
Albert P Carter 
Mr* Albert P Carter 
William P Chase 
Howard P Convene ' 

MarMuill 11. Dalton 
Mrs M. B Dalton 
Mr* James Dunlop 
Mr* W V M Fawcett 
Mm Mariorle M Gardiner 
Mm Paul M Goddard 
Prank J Hale 
Mrs W fc. Harding 
Mrs Fred R Hayward 
% K Jewell 
Reward W Jones 
Mrs. Arthur W Dane 
Robert It Loomis 
Mr* Elmore J Mut-Phle 
Donald U McKay 
Metcalf W Melcher 
Mr* M W Melcher 
John E Peake* 

Mm John E Hennas 
George E. liawaon 
Mr* George E ftawauu 
William H. Rice 
Mr* Piank L Richardson 
Mb.* Mubel L Itllry 
Mrs. Chari** A Hawin 
Mrs Charles L Hmlth 
Mrs George H Smith 
Clifford It Walker 
Thomas A West 

METCALF W MELCHER. President 
1 47 Lake Ava . Newton Csntis 
ROBERT H LOOM lb. Treasurer 
1 9U Forest Avs. West Newton 


TIRE RATIONING ENDS 

Ho mor. ctllficot*.! One. again orory b. able to drire In and get immediate 

one ie eligible to buy. and »oon You'll delivery on new tiree lor your car. J 

PRODUCTION OUTLOOK AT j 

_ _ m mg mm mm Tire manufacturers have been unable ,to (ill the great | 

A M " 1 |m H * need for new passenger car tires, in case we do not ■ 

las 11 mm have the right sise tire (or your car. we should be able | 

to get it soon. Come in lor lull information. 1 




HERE’S WHY yw’ll wist the 

1. F. Goodrich Silvertown 

Ri llf 111 

lirltiTitfi lsf M ml j | 

OUTWEARS 

PREWAR 

TIRES! 

HrlHVfSisiS K Ifl 

IMiMilill 8 mm 

K% 1 ‘ ’MlVm'vr 'Ir ' ' 


It has boon proved. More dun 2,000 tests and 
nearly 17,000,000 mile# of the toughest kind of 
road service showed that this new B. F. Goodrich 
Silvertown will Outwear Prewar natural rubber 
Tiree. 

Now, bottor rubber. B.F. Goodrich has de- 
veloped a rubber that's far better than ordinary 
synthetics. It helps the new Silvertown wear better 
and run cooler. It has greater resistance to cracking 
— and actually stands bruiaing and damage from 
accident! better. 

Tiro body 35% stronger. An entirely new. 

stronger cord is used, more of these cords are used 
in the top ply, an extra shock-absorbing breaker strip 


ie included. The result: a body that is 35% stronger 
for additional resistance to bruises, extra blowout 
protection. 

Flatter tread covers more ground. Called 

the "roed level” tread, it puts more rubber on the 
road, permits all the tread to share the wear. Result: 
a further increase in mileage, less scuffing, better 
distribution of weight, better traction, more safety 
on the turns. 

Plus 3 years' EXTRA experience. Three year-: 
before any other manufacturer, B.F. Goodrich sold 
tires containing synthetic rubber to American car 
owners. The extra know-how piled up in these yean 
is reflected in the new B. F. Goodrich Silvertown. 


EXTRA MILEAGE TIRE RECAPPING 

6.00-16 . . . $7.00 

WE LOAN YOU TIRES WHILE YOURS ARE 
BEING RECAPPED 

Service Charge — $1.00 each 

BR AM’S 

Battery and Tire Service 

252 Walnut Street Newtonville 

Call LASell 0835 

Httr "Dtltcl md Collect" ttury Thursday on ABC 9i30 p. m. BS. T. 


B.FGoodrich 

TIRES 


t 


PAGE THREE 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7. 1946 


Give “ Shirts-Off-Back *” To Help Scouts 

Overseas Gef Scouting Started Again 


Through tholr "Shirts- 
OfT-Our-Backs” c a m - 
paign in February, the 
Boy Scouts 'of America 
are giving usable uni- 
forms and equipment to 
help boys abroad re- 
sume Scouting. Scouts 
in the Philippines arc 
destitute and in Europe 
their condition isn’t 
better. 



NORUMBEGA COUNCIL has completed plans for partici- 
pation in the National Boy Scout "Shirts-Off-Our-Back Cam- 
paign." Scouts and Senior Scouts of Newton and Wel- 
lesley have commenced the collections of parts of uni- 
forms, Scouting and Camping equipment — to be held at 
each Troop and Senior Unit Headquarters and later to b» 
collected by the Council and shipped off to brother Scouts 
all over the world. A splendid* interest in this worthy 
project is evidenced by both the boys and Adult Leaders 
of Norumbega Council. 


Rent Control 

f Continued from Page 1 ) 

1, 1944, 369 areas covering about 
88 million people— or approxi- j 
mately two-thirds of our popula- 
tion have been brought under 
Rent Control. 

The Rent Regulations apply to 
all types of housing in controlled 
areas — wherever people live and 
pay rent— but not to office build- 
ings nor other commercial rent- 
als. 

Federal Rent Control is essen- 
tially a field operation. A Rent 
Executive is appointed for each I 
of th© 9 Regional offices and a 
Director for the more than 200 1 


Area Rent Offices. Under their 
guidance, tenants and landlords 
have the full protection of Uncle 
Sam and that protection means 
something! 

Rent Control is working. It is 
effective because it is supported 
—and suported because it is ef- 
fective. The Government passed 
the Emergency Price Control Act 
—but the people rolled up their 
sleeves and turned that oppor- 
tunity into achievement. 

Individual case histories re- 
veal how tenant and landlord in- 
equities have been corrected. The 
administrative burden has been 
enormous— but the results are 
eloquent. 


Aldermen - 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ment of which has been on strike 
for about two weeks. 

A petition of Reuben Kligman 
for a Junk collector’s license at i 
125 Pine street, Ward 4, was dr- j 
nied by the Board after several j 
residents of that section had 
expressed opposition at a hear- 
ing on the matter. Also rejected j 
was a petition of Andrew Maguz 
za for a second class auto deal- 
er’s licence at 184 California ; 
street, Ward 1, Alderman Hunt ; 
having reported that the peti- : 
tion has not been approved by 
the chief of police. 

A new petition filed by Edward 
S. Wallace, gunsmith, for a lic- 
ense to deal in and repair second 
hand firearms in a store on Bea- 
con Street, Newton Centre was 
rejected by a vote of 8 to 7, also 
a petition of George McLaughlin 
and Howard Kosrofian, both war 
veterans, for a permit to operate 
four bowling alleys at 1207 Chest- 
nut street, Newton Upper Falls, 
was rejected by a vote of 8 to 7. 
The petition of Robert Sneierson 
of the Able Building Wrecking 
Company for a license to buy and 
sell second hand materials at 
Rumford avenue, Ward 14, on 
the Howard B. Peterson property 
was denied by the Board, resi- 
dents of that section having pro- 


T HE HEWTON GRAPHIC. 

Slow Growing Flowers 
Need Extra Early Start 



Snapdragons (left), asters (top right) and petunias (bottom right) 
should all be started under protection for a long harvest of flowers. 


Most 'annual flowers will stand 
transplanting, and if sown id the 
house, or. in a greenhouse, hot- 
bed or cold frame, weeks before 
it is possible to sow them out- 
doors, they will begin to flower 


'LAS.II y Miller Oil Co. (mm 

,4200/ (EST - 19 2 5) 1^4200, 

69 RIVER ST. -WALTHAM. MASS. 


FUEL OILS 



tested against it, 

The Board granted the petition 
of Rocco R. DeAngelis for two 
pool tables at 191 Adams street, 

Ward 2, there being no opposi- 
tion to his petition. , 

The Board voted to authorize 
snow plows and other snow and 
ice removal equipment to drive 
east on the westbound roadway 
of Commonwealth avenue, so 

that snow would be piled up onto slow to S prminato and mature, am.ii. 
the reservation instead of into In scttin * out Plants rather than 
the driveways Qf residents. sowing seed direct there is 
Vice President Wendell R. 

Bauckman presided at the meet- 
ing in the absence of President 
Joseph B. Jamieson. 


quently, or kept constantly moist 
by automatic watering. 

The Clapper Company of 1121 
Washington street, West New- 
ton is glad to give advice on gar- 
den problems of all kinds. Mr. 
Howden, their seed and garden 
expert has had many years of 


much earlier than otherwise : experience in gardeninir in all 
when moved to the garden. , its phases and will gladly answer 
Asters, petunias and snap- questions, 
dragons especially should have j 
this early start, because they are 


Ice and snow Increase braking 
distance from 3 to 11 times that 
required on dry pavements, re- 
minds the Massachusetts Safety 
Council. 


A 



Planning for a 
Century of Peace 

From the councils of Dumbarton Oaks to the 
family conclave of the folks who live next door 
to you — people great and small are planning for 
peace. Here at the Newton Savings Bank we’re 
making plans, too . . . happy plans for a future 
that will include new homes new businesses — 
new opportunities for the men and women it is 
our privilege to serve. 

A savings bank has a peculiarly intimate rela- 
tionship with its clients. It shares their problems 
of the present and their dreams for the future. 
This bank takes enormous satisfaction, for in- 
stance, in the knowledge that more homes in 
this area have been financed by us than by any 
other institution. F^ 1 : over 116 years we have 
been safeguarding the savings of the people of 
this community; helping them finance educa- 
tional programs for their children; businesses for 
themselves, homes for their families. Whatever 
your particular dreams may be for the postwar 
years, won t you let us help you start planning 
now to make them coine true? Advice and 
and counsel from one of our olficers will put you 
under no obligation. 


NEWTON 

Savings Bank 

286 Washington Street at Newton Corner 
Newton'i Oldeit Bank 



Of course you do . . . but . 
isn’t it funny that the other sub- 
scribers on your party line, don’t 
have the faintest idea of the space 
of five minutes? 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 
Case No. 9353, Misc. 

,Seal » In Equity 

To Louise M. Goodwin, of 
Bristol, in the State of Con- 
necticut; any other persons 
interested in the estate of 
George W. Macgregor, for- 
merly of Newton, in the 
County of Middlesex and 
said Comonwealth, deceased, 
who have not released their 
interest in the land herein- 
after mentioned: 

GREETING: 
Whereas, a suit in equity has 


iM.MOMVK W.TII OF 
m \ ss \« hi m; i rs 

. ss. PROUATK c< 
persons interested ii 


t In 


Fill 


ed. 


■pin aril 
n In said County. de- 


Other advantage, which lies in 

the placing of plants. Since \ petition has been presented 
flowers are usually planted in M 11 ', * '••urt pr-r-.ig i • kithken 

* 1 . i M.mmnn - f saint George in the 

borders, rather than in rows, state of New v ri<, be ad- 

and often must be placed be- »>">i'tratrix of >.ud cstc.. without 

x x ... u J 1 . .. . yivinc a surety on her bond, 

tween established plants, It IS If you desire to obje -t -hereto you 
not easy to be sure of growing ; 1 ' ur attorney should flic a wVit- 

plants from seed in exactly tho bridge before odock in the fore- 

desired location. Another disad- ° 1 , > "i* 3 fifteenth day of Febru- 

. ... . ary J P IG. the return dav of this c-ita- 

vantage is that thinning out tj f „, 

plants becomes unnecessary, and "'itne-- John c. Leggat. Esquire, 
. xl l r xl i Fijtt-t Judge of said Court, this 

seed thus goes much farther. J twenty-fifth day of ja nuarv in the 

Many flowers have very small vo ' r 0,1,3 thousand nine hundred and 
seed, which must not be covered lorixg p. Jordan. 

deeply, lest growth be prevented: : (N) J3i - f ". 1 1 Register, 

sometimes indeed the seed is just j 

pressed into the soil. It is im- [ C °y \ \ ss\ < g ir s etts° F 

portant that flower seed is sown Middlesex.' 


in loose soil, rich in humus, 
which will not become too com- 
pact, or form a crust which 
might prevent the seedings from 
emerging. Many garden soils do 
not answer these specifications, 
but it is usually easy to find 
enough of the best type of soil 
to fill few flower pots or seed 
boxes, in which seeds may be 
sown with assurance that they 
will germinate and grow well. 

Because of this, gardeners of 
ten sow all flower seeds in this 
way, even outdoors, and move 
the plants when ready to loca- 
tions where they are desired. 
Seed boxes are easier to man 
age outdoors than under pro 


••state of 


PROBATE COURT 
persons interested in the 


'I 


irjnrlc ShnnntHjr 

••ton in said County, 


A petition has been 
said Court for probate 


.’.son ted to 1 


been begun in our Land Court tection, and growth is more rapid 
by Samuel Lippen, of said New- j than in the garden, for plants in 
ton, representing that he is the a seed box which can be shaded 
owner of a certain parcel of land when desirable, and watered fre- 
situate in said Newton on Chan- 
ning Street, and that said prem- 
ises were made subject to a 
mortgage given by Samuel Lip- 
pen to George W. Macgregor 
dated November 8, 1926, re- 

corded with the South Registry 
District of Middlesex County in 
Book 5039, Page 559, which has 
been paid but never discharged, 
and praying that said mortgage 
be declared to be a cloud on his 
title: 

WE COMMAND YOU, if you 
intend to make any defense, that 
on the first Monday of April 
next, which Monday is the re- 
turn day of this subpoena, or 
within such further time as the 
law allows, you do cause your 
written appearance to be entered 
and your written answer or 
other lawful pleading to be filed 
in the office of the Recorder of 
said Court at Boston, in the 
County of Suffolk and said Com- 
monwealth. and further that you 
defend against said suit accord- 
ing to law, if you intend to make 
any defense, and that you do 
and receive what the court shall 
order, adjudge and decree there- 


late n 
ceased 

A petition lias been presented to 
said < '■•urt. praying that Helen Shutn- 
wny Cutter of X.-wion in said County, 
be appointed administratrix of said 
estate, without giving a surety on 
her bond. 

If y>u desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should lile a writ- 
ten appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock *n the fore- 
noon on the fifteenth dav of Febru- 
ary 1D4G, the return day of this cita- 
tion. 

Witne--, John C. I.eggat. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-fifth day of January in the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

T.ORING P. JORDAN, 

(X) J31 - £7, H Register.' 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSAC H USETTS 
LAND COURT 


Petition to Foreclose Tax Lien 

(Seal) No. 28277 

| To All Whom It May Concern, 
and to Marian H. McDermott. 
1 now or formerly of Boston in the 
j County of Suffolk and said Com- 


COM.MOX WK AI.TH OF 
M ASSA( III SK I TS 

Middlesex, ss. I'HOUATH COURT 
To all persons Interested in the 
estate of 

Mary (•. Livermore i , l j - 

late of Newton in said County, de- , monwealth, or her heirs devisees 
ceased. 1 or legal representatives; Wil- 

liam W. Cherney of said Boston. 
i' e ,ast I Whereas, a petition has been 
Griswold ThermoVe* of Newton r: m presented to said Court by Max 
said County, praying that he he np- Ulin and Harriet T. Ulin of Bos- 
ShT/a 3S?L hhTb°i wlUu ' m j ton in the County of Suffolk and 
if vou desire to object thereto you 1 said Commonwealth, to foreclose 

rights of redemption from 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- the tax lien proceedings de- 

SmuHwSrdtSk* 1 in *» id p c,ition in , and 

citation. j concerning a certain parcel ot 

*»<* in Newton in the 

twenty-sixth day <«r January in th.- County of Middlesex ana in said 
year one thousand nine hundred and Commonwealth, bounded and de- 
tort> -lx. p Jordan. i scribed in said petition as fol- 

(X) J3l-f7.lt Regis 


lows: 

About 1968 square feet of 
land on Ferncroft Road, being 
more particularly described in 


COMMON WF VI. TII OK 

MASSACHUSETTS . 

Middlesex, ss. I'iUMUTH eoi’RT g t , c ti on 57. Block 12. Lot '4) 
o’ l. ought in. t-ram-is 


Hereof fail not. at your peril, 
as otherwise said suit may be 
ac^udged, and orders and de- 
crees entered therein, in your 
absence. 

And It appearing to the Court 
upon the suggestion of the 
plaintiff that there may be other 
persons interested In the estate 
of George W. Macgregor whose 
names and residences are un- 
known and they cannot actually 
he served with process, it is 
ORDERED that the plaintiff give 

further notice of this suit by j ,‘jV. 

publishing a true and attested • r 1 . bert . J3! 
copy of this order in the New- 
ton Graphic, a newspaper pub- 
lished in said Newton, once a 
week for three successive weeks, 
the last publication to be one 
month at least before the first 
Monday in April next. 

Witness, JOHN E. FENTON. 

Esquire. Judge of our Land 
Court, the twenty-eighth day of 
January, in the year of our Lord j 
nineteen hundred and forty-six. 

Robert E. French, 

Recorder. 

A true copy, 

Attest : 

Robert K. French, 

V N > j31-f 7- 14 Recorder. 


To Joseph 1*. O'Loughlln 

A. O'Loughlil). E-lw.t nl K. O'IxOUgh 
1 in. Gertrude F. o'l.oughlin. Aii<-*» «* 
Heniiessv and Martha A. Driscoll of 
Brookline in the County > f Norfolk 
and the City of Newton a municipal 
corporation and to al| other persons 
interested. 

A petition as amended lias been 

presented to said Court by Knit 
Street Corporation of Newton In said 
County, representing that it hold as 
tenant In common one undivided 
fourth part or share of certain land 
lying in Newton In said County and 
briefly described as follows : 

A certain parcel of land containing 
about :r>s.‘tss square feet .and bound- 
ed: Southerly by Hoylston Street 
1200 feet more or less, westerly by 
live lines 72 feet. 27S feel, :ti:t i 

feet. 10.: 1 :t feet and «'■«:. feet re- 

speetlvely. and easterly by two lines 
1210 feet and 112 feet respective!', 
being described In section th-, block 
2. lot .» of Assessors’ Plan, and be- 
ing the same premises as are the 
subject matter of the case now pend- 
ing In Land Court, described a* case 
Number 2<ni.’»7 ; setting forth ihu '« 

all tile following de- 

nf tut Id Inml nut) b a 

sold at private sale for not |e*s than 
twelve thousand and O'- hundred 
dollars, and praying that partition 

may he made of nil the land afore- 
said according to l;u\ and to that end 
that a commissioner he appointed to 
make such partition and he ordered 
to make sale and conveyance of all. 
or any part of said land which the 
Court finds cannot be adv autageousl v 
divided cither at private sale or pub- 
lic auction, and be ordered to dis- 
tribute the net proceeds 'hereof. 

If sou desire to object -hereto vou 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the fifteentlf day of Febru- 
ary 1946, the return day of this cita- 
tion. 

Witness. John C I.eggat, 

First Judge of -aid Court, tin- ■ ' 
teenth das of Jumi.us m tin- seat 
one thousand nine bundled and foil' 


IN • )»« U fl 


1. OKING 


JORDAN 


DB of Assessors' Plan 

If you desire to make any ob- 
jection or defense to said peti- 
tion you or your attorney must 
file a written appearance and an 
answer, under oath, setting forth 
clearly and specifically your ob- 
jections or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 
the Recorder of said Court in 
Boston (at the Court House', on 
or before the eighteenth day of 
February next. 

Unless your appearance is 
filed by or for you, your default 
will be recorded, the said peti- 
tion will bo taken as confessed 
and you will be forever barred 
from contesting said petition or 
any decree entered thereon. 

And in addition to the usual 
service of this notice as required 
by law, it is ordered that the 
foregoing citation be published 
forthwith once each week for 
three successive weeks in the 
Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in said Newton. 

Witness. John E. Fenton, Es 
quire. Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-third day of January in 
the year nineteen hundred and 
forty-six. 

Attest wit it seal of said Court. 

ROBERT E. FRENCH. 

Recorder 

Max UUn 
11 Beacon Street 
Pro se 

Jan. 31. Feb. 7, 14 


Newton High School 
News 

— o — * 

Dr. Richard Gummere, Har- 
vard University, addressed the 
school faculty on January 29. 
His subject was "General Educa- 
tion in a Free Society," the Har- 
vard Report which is a current 
best seller. 

The Curriculum Committee, 
headed by Assistant Principal 
Dr. Edward C. Drake is meeting 
each Monday afternoon. A re- 
vised pamphlet on educational 
opportunities in Newton High 
School will be published this 
spring. 

Final group pictures for this 
year’s Newtonian have been tak- 
en. The manager of circulation, 
Joanne Collard, is now campaign- 
ing for a banner subscription 
of 2000. 

Newton High School contribut- 
ed $243.61 to the Infantile Par- 
alysis Foundation Funds. 

All boys in the school filled out 
a questionnaire last week to pro- 
vide information on Scouting in 
! Newton. 

i Special guidance marks were 
placid on pupil's cards on Mon- 
day. February 4. This date mark- 
ed the end of many half-year 
courses and the beginning of 
new courses in several depart- 
ments. 

After a most Interesting, as 
well as profitable, trip to the late 
Charles Connick stained glass 
window studios, the seniors of 
Miss Ells' Industrial Design 
Class made their own stained 
glass designs, seven of which are 
now on display in Mr. Drake's 
oflice. The group took their trip 
to the Connick studios after 
school as a project. Not only 
were they shown around the 
studios, but they were permitted 
to watch a church window in the 
making, step by step, from the 
first layout to the cutting and 
placing of the glass. There was 
a splendid opportunity to ob- 
serve the many intricate opera- 
tions which enter into the mak- 
ing of one stained glass window. 

The Music Club of Newton 
High School continued its fine 
record of presenting distinguish- 
ed celebrities in the current musi- 
cal world at its current monthly 
meetings by having Mr. Lucas 
Foss as its guest on Thursday, 
Jan. 17. Mr. Foss, at 23. has al- 
ready made quite a name for 
himself as the pianist of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. Rec- 
ognition of his ability came when 
he won the Guggenheim Fellow- 
ship and the Pulitzer Scholar- 
ship. His more familiar works 
include "The Gift of the Mai," a 
ballet, and "The Prairie," a dram- 
atic cantata. In the near future 
he is to be guest conductor of the 
Pittsburgh Symphony and Leon- 
ard Bernstein's New York City 
Center Orchestra. 

January 22. the Excutive Coun- 
cil met to discuss and pass sev- 
eral bills that had been handed 
down by the Legislature. 

Norma Simmons delivered a 
speech pertaining to the award- 
ing of larger N s for all girls who 
have made a team in Newton 
High School. She said. "Newton 
High School is an outstanding 
school with outstanding sports. 
There is no reason why the girls 
should not have outstanding let- 
ters. When we play teams from 
other schools, their girls always 
wear letters which can be seen 
from a distance. The Newton 
High letters are so small that 
they are harly noticeable. This 
is why they are never worn in 
their present size." The bill con- 
cerning chenille and larger TVS 
was passed. All girls who are 
awarded chenille N's have to be 
on three varsities and have to 
put a great deal of time into the 
sports. 

The building custodians have 
a worthy war record. Terrence 
Connolly. John Babbitt, John 
Precious, Louis Tibald. and Fran- 
ces Tibald are veterans who have 
recently joined the N.H.S. jani- 
tor staff. John Delaney. Arthur 
Rogers. Fred Greene, and Louis 
Marcell are veterans of World 
War I. Charles Thomas, who has 
worked for the Newton School 
system for over 32 years is a vet- 
eran of the Spanish War. For 
two hundred nights the custo- 
dians stayed on duty while the 
Red Cross used the school build- 
ing. The custodian service is 
constantly improving. John De- 
laney and Joseph Maindola took 
a two-weeks course on the Care 
of School Buildings. 

Miss Irene Haworth. English 
instructor at Newton High flew 
to Washington the week-end of 
Jan. 20 to attend the meeting of 
the National Executive Board of 
the Women's Overseas Service 
League. This organization was 
formed after the last war by 
women numbering about 25,000 
who served overseas during the 
war in order to help disabled vet- 
erans, men and women, who had 
served overseas. Its present aim 
is to be of any use it can; dur- 
ing this war it has helped sol- 
diers. refugees, and sent over 
10,000 articles abroad to be used 
in devastated countries. Over 
100 women in Greater Boston are 
members of the organization 

From Thursday. Jan. 17, 
through the following Saturday 
at th Hotel Hollenden, Cleveland, 
hio, there took place America’s 
first post-war conference on vet- 
erans' education. Sponsored by 
the Department of Adult •Educa- 
tion of the N.E.A. ((National 
Education Association), the con- 
ference was attended by educa- 
tional leaders in the high schools, 
preparatory schools, and colleges 
of 44 states, members of govern- 
ment agencies being present m 
an advisory capacity. Mr. Don 


Col. Patrick- Wm. McLeod 


(Continued from Page 1) 

ville, Virginia. In Tokyo, Col. 
Patrick ■•■..I Chiel ol the Plan* 
ning Unit of General McArthur’s 
Government Section charged 
with revision of the Imperial 
Japanese Government. Col Pat 
rick was awarded the Bronze 
Star Medal by the War Depart- 
ment. and the Military Merit 
Medal by the Commonwealth of 
the Philippines Government. He 
Intends to return to the practice 
J of law at 84 State street, Boston. 


aid Enoch counsellor for dis- 
charged war veterans in Newton 
High School, was our school rep- 
resentative. 

Specifically, the assembly was 
designed to study problems re- 
lating to veterans' education so 
that solutions might be suggest- 
ed to national, state, and local 
agencies, and to encourage com- 
munity participation in helping 
to solve the educational needs of 
veterans. Dividing themselves up 
into 15 committees, each attack- 
ing the subject from a different 
phase, the delegates worked three 
sessions per day, from early 
morning until as late as 10:30 
at night, in an effort to formu- 
late overall national policies and 
to try to coordinate divergent 
methods already employed in 
different communities. 

Mr. Enoch participated in the 
work of two of these committees, 
the first being on "How coin a 
community coordinate its many 
educational and training oppor- 
tunities to meet the needs of vet- 
erans?" and also "What are the 
leadership responsibilities of the 
public schools?” The second con- 
cerned "How should curriculums 
be developed and reorganized to 
meet veteran needs?" Accord- 
ing to Mr. Enoch. Newton High’s 
reintegrating of veterans into 
the school while extending to 
them the privileges of a college 
campus is. as far as he could 
learn, a unique way of helping 
the ex-servicemen. In other cities 
the policy has been rather to es- 
tablish altogether separate high 
schools for the former solcfiers. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
subject at Boston University 
and special lecturer at Dart- 
mouth college. 

Mr. McLeod had long been 
prominent in public circles, in 
the National Retail Goods Asso- 
ciation. the Associated Merchan- 
dising Corporation and the Bos- 
ton Retail Trade Board. He was 
a member of the Boston City 
Club, the Charles River Country 
Club, and the Nantucket Yacht 
Club, and served as chairman in 
1945 of the consumer division of 
th'- Red Cross fund campaign. 

He leaves his wife, Mrs. Berta 
Hanson McLeod, a son, William 
H. McLeod, Jr., a senior at Phil- 
and a 

daughter. Mrs. Nancy Gaylord. 


• mmonw f w.rii OF 

>1 \ \ « III '•F I Th 

PIigratr court 

R = 

ar>» It lit h llrmly Parr’ll 


I.egx 1 1. Esquirs, 
T C ur*. thi* 
• • - » 

nine hundred ar.d 


in X W K VLT If OK 
" \( 11 1 TTh 

PR 1 'BATE COURT 


'■-th M. wninr.1 

-. in -aid County, de- 


! said 

"aid Court 
<.-ount. 


C. Leg? it. Esquire, 
f Court, this 

f Jan :--- in the year 
. - . ' 

RING P JORDAN. 

Register. 


FOR 


MORTGAGE 

MONEY 


Call at 


West Newton Savings Bank 

WEST NEWTON 



Authorized 

AUTOMOTIVE 

ELECTRICAL 

Sales arui Service 


CARBURETORS GENERATORS 

FUEL PUMPS TIRES STARTERS 
SPEEDOMETERS BATTERIES 

NEWTON CARBURETOR 1 IGNITION 00. 

9 SI WATERTOWN ST. W. NEWTON LASell 9492 


iPf R(f (IRINtifoNCWION ElKTRICftPP 





' • NEWTON 
ELECTRIC APPLIANCE co - 

REPAIR* ON ALL MAKES OF APPLIANCES 
PHONE IAUU49U-&47 BEACON (T.« MINION OgltE S9. MASS 


(f VALENTINES GAY 

uj mi 

a '<h 

Rti sxpn ' Nr' 1 

tor her with 



Fleers: 


Eastman's Flower Shop 

346 WALNUT ST NEWTONVILLI 





PAGE FOUR 


Jim Walton, Pres, of 
Norumega Gonncil, 
Talks Before Kiwanis 

.Tim Walton, who became a 
member of Boy Scout Troop 11, 
one of Newton’s two oldest 
Troops, thirty years ago. and 
who is now president of the 
Norumbega Council. Boy Scouts 
of America, told the Newton 
Kiwanis Club, at the noon meet- 
ing last Wednesday, that the or- 
ganization will celebrate its 36th 
anniversary Friday, February 
8th. 

Founded February 8, 1910, Mr. 
Walton said, the Boy Scouts of 
America, including Leaders, are 
now two million strong. Den 
Mothers supervise the activities 
of Cub Scouts youngsters in the 
9 to 12 year age brackets. The 
chief interest of the Cubs is in 
handicraft and in "good clean 
fun." he added. 

Boys from 12 to 15 years are 
enrolled as Scouts. Starting as 
a tenderfoot, a scout advances 
to 2nd and 1st class on his abil- 
ity and good standing as a 
scout. Every boy must pass cer- 
tain tests to obtain the various 
merit badges, and the rank of 
Eagle Scout is the highest in 
Scouting. 

The Sea Scouts. Mr. Walton 
continued, have a membership 
of boys over 15 years of age. 
They have their own boats or a 
"land ship” and are familiar 
with the intricacies of naviga- 
tion and seagoing lore. 

Membership in the Scouts, Mr. 
Walton concluded, is open to 
boys of all races and creeds. 
The only requirement being that 
a boy must be a good citizen 
and as a scout, adhere to the 
Scout oath to “Do his duty to 
God — to his country — and to all 
other people, and that he keep 
himself morally straight.” 

Club Notes 

Cady Peck was presented a 
pin for perfect attendance since 
he became a member, Feb. 1944. 
The Valentine Day party plan- 
ned for the youngsters at the 
Peabody Home for Crippled 
Children, will probably be post- 
poned because so many of the 
little ones are ailing at the 
Home. Next week, a moving pic- 
ture of the 1945 World Series 
will be shown. Vice President 
‘Doc’ Marcoux presided at this 
meeting, in the absence of Pres- 
ident Bill Sullivan. 


Newtonville 


T HE NEWTON G R A P H I C_ 

N czo ton Club Activities 


THURSDAY. FERRUARY 7. 1948 


Lt. Col. Burton M. Woodwn ’. 
and Mrs. Woodward of Jackson- j 
vlllc, Florida, are spending a i 
few days with Col. Woodward’s 
father, Mr. Percy E. Woodward 
of Highland avenue. 

— o 

New Civilian Rlood Service 

“Newton is planning to co- 
operate in a State-wide procure- 
ment and distribution of blood 
plasma for civilian use," says Mrs. 
C. Terry Collens, Chairman of 
Blood Donors for Newton Red 
Cross. “The Massachusetts De- 
partment of Health is prepared 
to collect and process plasma and 
all other blood derivatives in 
order that all citizens of the State 
may receive free of charge any 
necessary transfusions. We, in 
Newton, can be justly proud of 
our war-time Blood Donor record 
which makes us confident that an 
opportunity to help our neigh- 
bors will meet with quick re- 
sponse.” 

The new program means that 
in case of disaster or efnergency, 
Newton citizens, whether they 
personally have donated blood or 
not, will be entitled to receive 
blood plasma and blood products 
from the banks in their local hos- 
pitals and health centers. 

The mobile unit will be station- 
ed at the Newton Red Cross 
Chapter House, 21 Foster street, 
Newtonville, on February 19 from 
10:45 to 4:45 and February 20 
from 12:45 to 6:45. It is anticipat- 
ed that many men and women 
will come direct from work on 
this latter date and donate blood 
before going home. 

Please call Lasell 6000 for an 
appointment. 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
M AS8ACH CSF.TTS 

Middlesex, ks. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons Interested In the 
estate of 

Jemima M. MeKenile 

also known ns Jemima Maxwell Mc- 
Kenzie late of Newton in said County, 
deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that Joseph 
Pierre Belliveau of Cambridge In said 
County, public administrator, be ap- 
pointed administrator of said e-tate 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary 1946. the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. Uegg.it. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this 
thirtieth day of January in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 

six. 

T.ORING P. JORDAN. 

(N) f 7 -14-21 Register. 


^?NS.y «« 


* Isoy J 


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your loan — friendly 
service — low rates 
— convenient month- 
ly repayment plan. 


I 


NEWTON CENTRE 
SAVIN6S BANK 

lOtUNIONST. • NEWTON CENTRE 


RE-ROOF NOW 
and SAVE! 

If you need a new roof ask to 
see Barrett Mineral Surfaced 
Asphalt Shingles. They are 
handsome, sturdy, tough, long- 
lasting. It will cost you nothing 
to let us show you samples 
and it may save you much! 

PECK LUMBER CO. 

247 Newtonville Ave. 


AXMINSTER FIGURED 
CARPETS 
(9 ft. wide) 
MOTTLE VELVET 
27 in. CARPETS 
Blue - Red • Green 
- ORIENTAL RUGS - 
Below Retail Prices 

Call MR. ROBINSON, former- 
ly with Paine Furniture Co., 
WAT. 4763 for estimates and 
appointment at your home. 


Newton 

Community Club 

— o- - 

I The February meeting of New- 
ton Community club will be held 
in the Underwood school hall on 
Thursday, February 14 at 2 p.m. 1 

A special musical program will 
be given by the Floradora Qunr j 
tette in music and songs in cos- 
tumes of the period. The Qunr- 1 
tette is composed of Elizabeth | 
Golden, soprano: Katharine Dean, 
mezzo-soprano: Nancy Trickey, 
lyric soprano, and Eleanor Davis, 
fjnezzo-soprano. They will be as- 
sisted hv William Weigle. bari- 
tone. and Robert Irving, accom- 
panist. 

Miss Marion A. Bryant will be 
in charge of a food sale hefore I 
and after the meeting. 

Tea will be served during the 
social hour by Mrs. Frank A. | 
Bagdasarian. and Mrs. Donald : 
MacKenzie. 

Wednesday, April 3rd has been | 
chosen as the date for the Spring 
Dessert Bridge to be held at the 
Hunnewell Club. 

Auburndale 
Woman's Club 

— o — 

The Massachusetts State Fed- 
; oration of Women’s Clubs. Mrs. 
Edwin Troland. president, are 
the guests of the Auburndale 
Women's Club, at the Club In- i 
stitute Forum. Mrs. Wilson H. I 
Roads, chairman, to be held on 
Tuesday. February 12. at 2 p.m. 
The meeting will be opened by 
the Pledge of Allegiance to the 
Flag, and "Star Spangled Ban- 
ner.” 

Mrs. Eric J. Kcrmath, presi- 
dent of the Auburndale Woman’s 
Club will bring welcome from 
the club. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Cornell. Di- 
rector of the Twelfth District 1 
will bring greetings from the J 
district. Mrs. Harvey E. Green- ; 
wood. 1st vice-president of the : 
M.L.F.W.C. will give the greet- 
ings of the Federation. 

Mrs. Joseph E. Davidson. Par- 
liamentarian will speak on "The 
Annual Meeting.” Announce- 
ments for the War Relief work 
will be made by Mrs. John A. 
Jennings, chairman and Mrs. 
William J. McDonald and Mrs. 
Nathaniel E. Smith will speak ; 
for “Topics" in the subscription 
and programme line. 

Mrs. W. R. Bell, Secretary of 
Scholarships, presents “Why 
Scholarships?" 

Mrs. Warren Whitman, Dis 
trict Legislation chairman pre- 
sents, “Pending Legislation,” fol- 
lowed by a Question Period. 

Mrs. Robert Max Ulin, Mem- 
ber of Institute Committee will 
speak for “Woman’s Responsi- 
bility for Peace" and Mrs. Ed- 
ward H. Averill, Vice-Chairman 
of Education, speaks on "Educa- 
tional Problems.” 

Mme. Lin Ching Tung, former 
Professor at Swathmore College 
will talk on “Woman’s Responsi- 
bility in the Now China.” 


West Newton 
Community Center 

— o — 

The West Newton 'Community 
Center held the Annual Meet- 
ing of the Corporation and of j 
its Board of Directors recently 
at the Clubhouse on the Davis 
School Playground. 

Mrs. William H. Cady, Direct- 
or of the Center, reported on 
the function and services of the 
Center in the past year. It was 
gratifying to hear 'Mrs. Cady 
tell of the fun and instruction 
the members enjoy at the Cen- 
ter and to realize so many take 
advantage of its benefits. Mrs. 
Robert H. Loomis gave the 
Clerk’s report summarizing the 
aims and accomplishments of the 
Board of Directors. Mr. H. J. 
Pettengill of the Newton Com- 
munity Chest and Mrs. Barbara 
Stearns of the Comunity Coun- 
cil were guests at the meetings. 
Delicious bouillon and wafers 
were served by Mrs. George C. 
Sweeney who was assisted by 
Mrs. Henry F. Cate. Jr. 

The following officers were 
elected for the coming year: 
President, Mrs. Hugh L. Robin- 
son; Honorary Vice President, 
Mrs. Robert H. Gross; 1st Vice 
President, Mrs. Henry F. Cate, 
Jr.; 2nd Vice President, Mrs. 
William P. Helms; 3rd Vice 
President, Mrs. Frederick C. 
Wells; Clerk and Secretary, Mrs. 
Sidney L. Sholley; Correspond- 
ing Secretary, Mrs. L. A. Myers; 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. Duncan Rus- 
sell; Asst. Treasurer, Miss Cath- 
erine M. Bolster; Member at 
large, Mrs. George C. Sweeney; 
Executive Director, Mrs. Wil- 
liam H. Cady. 

The work of the West Newton 
Community Center is accom- 
plished through the support of 
the Newton Community Chest. 


SAFES and MONEY CHESTS 

Complete Burglary and Fire Protective 
Equipment — All Types of Piling 
Methods Equipment 
DimoLU. Inc. ~ Since 1857 
HO Sodburr Bt.. Boston — I.AF. 3MH 
KOBERT F.. BIEL. 8aie» Representative 


INCOME TAXES 
PREPARED 

FEDERAL and STATE 
Individual and Business 
IMMEDIATE SERVICE 
«81 MOODY ST , WALTHAM 
Open afternoons and e-.rnlnci 


L CONTE 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

Expert service to satisfy your desire. Alter or repair your home. 
Playroom re-modeling and cabinet work are our specialties. 
Many Newton and Brookline residents have patronized our services. 

Telephone NEEdham 1309-M 


A. A. KENNELS 


BOARDED and fOH BALI 

141 Nahanton St.. Newton Centro 
BIGolow 8400 


ANIMAL CLINIC 
and HOSPITAL 

Froo Diagnosis, n on in | oil l)all: 
Saturday. 1> <»0 to I * mi 
SCHOOL OK VETERINARY ... I)IC 
MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY 
South St.. Waltham • lei. WAL. ! 


DR. RICHARD SCHOFIELD 
Veterinarian 

having returned from overseas 
ANNOUNCES 
the reopening of his 

Small Animal Hospital 


1105 Heaeon Street 


Newton Highlands 


Lucy Jackson 
Chapter, D.A.R. 

— o — 

Mrs. J. Walter Allen will give 
a resume of the talks given at 
the Massachusetts Approved 
Schools Forum by Mr. Ullery of 
International College of Spring- 
field. and by Mr. Whittemore of 
Hillside School at Marlboro, at 
the regular meeting of Lucy 
Jackson Chapter, D.A.R., to be 
held at the Chapter House in 
Newton Lower Falls on Monday, 
February 11th, 1946, at 2:00 p.m. 
Colored lantern slides of the His 
torical Windows of Washington 
Memorial Chapel at Valley Forge 
will be shown. 

Delegates and Alternates to 
the March Conference will be 
elected at this meeting. 

The Co-Chairman for the Tea 
are Mrs. Holcombe J. Brown and 
Mrs. Edward H. Lotz. 

O ; 

Newton Figure 
Skating Club 

— o — 

Weather permitting, the New- 
ton Figure Skating Club will 
hold an ice carnival and skating 
party on Crystal Lake, Newton 
Centre, Saturday, February 16th, 
j at 2:30 p.m. Featured will be 
| ice dancing and free skating ex- 
| hibitions by its members and 
; guests. Many high ranking con- 
testants in the recently held New 
‘ England Championships will 
i skate, as well as competition in 
! the coming Eastern or National 
i Championships. Alternate dates, 
j if postponement is necessary due 
. to weath conditions, will he Sun- 
day, February 17, or the follow- 
; ing Saturday and Sunday. 
o — 

Mather Class 

J The Mather Class will meet 
j on Feb. 10 at the First Baptist 
; church at 9:45 a.m. Subject, 
"Science and the Future." New 
triumphs for the healers. Guest 
speakn Professor Antonios Sav- 
ides. 

Tin- Round Table will in- held 
at the home of Rev. Dr. and 
i Mrs. Arbuckle, 46 Cedar street. 


Newton Centre 
Neighborhood Club 

— o — 

The Newton Centre Neighbor- 
hood Club will meet at the home 
of Mrs. Charles C. Brown, 151 
Allenton road, Newton High- 
lands, on February 11, at 7:45 
p.m. 

Current Events will be re- 
viewed by Miss Mary K. Allen. 

The hostesses for the evening 
are Mrs. John Storer, assisted 
by Mrs. Russell Clark, Mrs. Stu- 
art Wills, and Mrs. Donald Mar- 
ten. 

Newton Junior 
Community Club 

— o — 

The fifth regular meeting of 
the Newton Junior Community 
Club was held on Monday even- 
ing, February fourth, at six-thir- 
ty, at the Newton Y.M.C.A. This 
meeting was unusual, due to the 
fact that it was a “Pot Luck Sup- 
per,’’ and was so informal. Each 
club member brought either a 
hot dish, a salad, rolls, cake pie 
or some contribution for the 
meal. Plates were heaping, and 
everything tasted delicious. 
Groups of club members ate at 
individual tables and thus got 
to know other club members bet- 
ter, due to the informality. Aft- 
er supper there was a short bus- 
iness meeting, with Miss Jane 
Mansfield, president, presiding. 
A vote was taken at this time for 
the club to contribute to the Red 
Cross. 

Miss Alice M. Andersen, chair 
man of Community Service and 
War Work Committee, spoke 
about our club project. That is 
our plan for doing work at the 
New England Peabody Home for 
Crippled Children, in Newton 
Centre. Each club member has 
been asked to "adopt" a child and 
see that that child receives a 
birthday card, ca_rds on other 
special days during the year, 
personal visits, and any other 
little remembrances and atten- 
tions which the individual wishes 
to give. Plans were made to vis- 
it these children the third Sun- 
day afternoon of each month, and 
at which time stories can be read, 
the child can be entertained, and 
club members can learn to know 
the patient better and become 
personally interested in her 
"adopted” child. This project 
will not only help the child, but 
will be a service to the commun- 
ity, and bring personal satisfac- 
tion to each club member. 

At the dost* of the business 
meeting, there was an auction of 
“white elephants" donated by 
club members. The girls were 
finite enthusiastic about the auc- 
tion. and everything was pur- 
chased from riding hoots .to soap 
flakes. 

A lot of credit goes to Mrs. 
Thomas Seeley, chairman of the 
Sports Committee and to Miss 
Harriet Tashpian, recording sec- 
retary, who were in charge of 
the meeting for the evening. It 
certainly was an unusual meet- 
ing, and a social success. 

p 

Newton Highlands 
C.L.S.C. 

— o — 

The Newton Highlands C.L.S.C. 
will meet on Monday, Feb. 11 at 
the home of Mrs. Emery Clark, 
138 Alien on road. Mrs. Hiram 
Miller will conduct the work on 
l "Conditions of Life In Rural 
! America.” 


Newton 

Newcomers Club 

— o — 

The Newton Newcomers Club 
met Friday, February 1 at the 
Newton Centre Women’s Club for 
its usual program of dessert 
and bridge. 

A short business meeting was 
presided over by Mrs. C. Roy 
Rook. Plans were discussed for 
an evening party. Two new resi- 
dents of the Newtons were intro- 
duced: Mrs. l$uth Cadieux of 
Syracuse, N. Y., and Mrs. Everet 
Temple of Philadelphia, Pa. 

The winners at bridge were: 
Mrs. C. Roy Rook, Mrs. Roy 
Guernsey, Mrs. Robert Riedel, 1 
Mrs. W. O. Foss, and Mrs. Her- j 
bert Ham. 1 

The next meeting will be Feb- 
ruary 15. 

• o 

Social Science Club 
of Newton 

— o — 

Following the business meeting 
on February 13th, Mrs. Everett E. 
Kent will read a paper on "The 
Annexation of Texas." The hos- 
tesses will be Mrs. William Faw- 
cett and Mrs. Gordon Russell. 

Whiting Chapter, 
D.A.R. 

— o — 

The Junior Group of the Nydia 
Partridge Whiting Chapter, 
D.A.R. will hold their next meet- 
ing Tuesday, Feb. 12 at 8 p.m. 
Mrs. Arthur Berberian of 37 
Park street, Newton Centre is 
the hostess. The guest speaker 
for the evening is Miss Virginia 
Thomas, a member of the group. 
Miss Thomas was a member of 
the American Red Cross for 
twenty-two months. She was in 
charge of a club mobile and saw 
service in Ireland, England, 
France and Germany. 

0 

Rotary Club 

— o — 

Raymond A. Green. Principal 
of the Newton High School, was 
the speaker at the meeting of 
the Newton Rotary Club held at 
the Brae Burn Country Club last 
Friday. 

Mr. Green’s subject was “The 
Problem Facing the High School 
Graduate.” 

Among the quantity of facts 
presented in support of Mr. 
Green’s thesis that secondary 
school graduates, including New- 
ton High School graduates, will 
encounter unusual difficulties in 
gaining admittance in June to 
higher institutions of learning, 
the following deserve special 
mention: 

(1) The G. I. Bill of Rights, 
the backlog of students who 
would have entered college had 
the war not occurred, and high- 
er standard of living have re- 
sulted in a tremendous influx of 
college candidates. 

(2) It seems clear that unless 
local communities take the in- 
itiative, many graduates who 
normally would attend college or 
other schools after High School, 
will be unable to do so. 

(3) The same situation may 
exist with the non-college youth 
who will be seeking immediate 
employment in competition with 
the more mature G. I. 

(4) The G. I. himself is now 
being refused admittance to 
post-high school Institutions. 

Newton is now exploring what 
can be done to meet the situa- 
tion. The speaker indicated that 
when the need is dearly estab- 
lished, the High and Trade 
Schools are in a position to of- 
fer a 13th year of instruction. 
Physical facilities and staff are 
already available for the most 
part in both liberal arts and vo- 
cational training programs. The 
rapid-fire question period indi- 
cated the high interest of the 
Club in the subject as presented 
by Mr. Green. 

Visitors included Edward Es- 
son, George Esler, Robert Finlay 
and Louis Bachrach, all of the 
Boston club; Raymond Blan- 
chard of Watertown, John Walsh 
of Waltham, Daniel Frawley 
and Daniel Comisky of Needham, 
Francis Harding and Lyman 
Rutledge of Dedham; William 
Rome, Thomas McGrath, C. F. 
Cormier, Winthrop Forbush, Jul- 
ius Mueller, Dr. Richard I. Smith, 
Rr. Arthur D. Baldwin, John C. 
Adams and Fabian Bachrach 

It was announced that the 
Town Meeting of the Air will 
note “Rotary Night" on Thurs- 
day evening, Feb. 21. Among 
the participants will be Dorothy 
Thompson and Father Flanagan 
of Boys’ Town. 

o 

"Gifts in Tin" 

— o — 

The Newton Chapter Red Cross 
has purchased a can sealer and 
is planning to hold canning meet- 
ings each month until further 
notice. Bring the food which you 
wish to send to your service man 
overseus and we will show you 
how to puck and seal It.. All types 
of cooked dry foods can be sent 
In tin— cookies, candy, cheese, 
nuts and even peanut butter. A 
charge of five cents per can Is 
; made to cover the cost of cans 
and equipment. It would be ap- 
preciated if a call is made to 
clthep Lasell 6000 of Mrs. John 
Helbeck, Lasell 1487 stating the 
l number of cans required. 


Home Moiling Conn* 

Staits Monday 

— O — 

"You can relieve the hospitals, 
so acutely understaffed, by caring 
for illness at home," states Mrs. 
B. Alden Thresher, chairman, 
Home Nursing, Newton Red 
Cross. “The response to the short- 
ened course “Six Lessons in the 
Care of the Sick," has been so 
gratifying that new classes are 
constantly forming. We want the 
women of Newton to have every 
oportunity to learn these timely ; 
lessons.”* 

On Monday evening Feb. 11th, 
a new course starts and continues 
each Monday and Wednesday 
evening from 7:30 to 9:30 for 
three weeks, at the Chapter 
House, 21 Foster street, Newton- 
ville. Please call Mrs. Edward 
Blake, BIG. 4916, for Information 
and registration. 

Certificates for “Six Lessons in 
the Care of the Sick” have been 
granted Mrs. Klas Anderson, Mrs. 
Lawrence C. DeLuca, Mrs. Ros- 
ario Guzzi, Mrs. Arthur E. Kelle- 
her, Mrs. Irving J. Keefe, Mrs. 
George F. Koller, Mrs. Jack Liuz- 
zo, Mrs. Joseph F. Spiliane and j 
Mrs. Richard W. Stearns. 

HEARING NOTICE FROM 
OFFICE OF CITY CLERK 
NEWTON 

CITY OF NEWTON 

February 7, 1946 
Committee On Claims and Rules 

WHEREAS, Petitions have 
been filed with the Board of 
Aldermen of the City of Newton 
as defined in list attached here- 
to for the modification of Dis- 
trict Boundary Lines as estab- 
lished by "Zoning Ordinance, 
Chapter XXXVIII, as amended,” 
and 

WHEREAS, Said Board of 
Aldermen intend to grant said 
petitions, it is therefore 
ORDERED, That a hearing be 
had thereon and that Thursday, 
the 7th day of March, 1946, at 
7:45 o’clock in the evening, at 
the City Hall in said Newton, 
before the Committee on Claims 
and Rules of the Board of Aider- 
men, be and the same is hereby 
assigned as the time and place 
for hearing all parties interested 
therein. It is further 
ORDERED, that two weeks 
previous to said date of hearing, 
due notice of said intention and 
of said hearing be given by 
notice of the same posted in the 
vicinity of the proposed change; 
and that further notice be given 
by publication in the Newton 
Graphic on February 7, 1946, 
under the provisions of Chapter 
320 of the Acts of the General 
Court of 1941. 

Read and adopted, 

FRANK M. GRANT, 

City Clerk. 
List of Petitions accompany- 
ing Order of Hearing for Modifi- 
cation of District Boundary Lines 
shown below: 

#87859. William B. Baker, et al, 
changing real estate from 
General Residence District, to 
Business District, land bound- 
ed westerly by land of Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, 
northerly by Hammond’s Pond, 
easterly by Single Residence 
A District, and southerly by 
Boylston Street, comprising 
Section 66, Block 3, Lots 27, 
28 and 29 inclusive, Ward 6. 
j #87861. Arthur Silvestri, chang- 
ing real estate from Single 
Residence B District to Private 
Residence District, land bound- 
ed westerly by Glen Avenue, 
northerly by Manufacturing 
District and Boston and Al- 
bany Railroad, (Highland 
J Branch), easterly by City of 
1 Newton Playground, and south- 
: erly by line approximately 150 
; feet north of Warren Street, 
comprising Section 63, Block 
8. Lots 2 and 7 inclusive, Ward 
6 . 

#87860. Charlotte T. Bergeson, 
changing real estate from Sin- 
gle Residence B District to 
Business District, land on 
northerly side of Beacon Street 
west of Centre Street, from 
present business zone westerly, 
comprising Section 61, Block 
23, Lot 10, Ward 6. 

#87947. Anna M. and Arthur T. 
Fowler, et al. changing real 
estate from Single Residence 
B District to Business District, 
land on northerly side of Bea- 
con Street west of Centre 
Street, from present business 
zone westerly, comprising Sec- 
tion 61, Block 23, Lot 11, Ward 
6; and land on southerly side 
of Beacon Street west of Cen- 
tre Street, from line of Bap- 
tist church lot westerly, cqpv 


Upper Falls 


Mrs. Arthur H. Elkins who has 
been recovering from an opera- 
tion at the Newton-Wellesley 
Hospital has returned to her 
home at 23 High street. 

Rev. A. K. Fillmore, Pastor of 
the Second Baptist church will 
preach on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. 
from the topic, "The First ChRis- 
tians." 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Murphy 
and family of Chestnut street 
have moved to Quint avenue, 
Allston. 

Rev. Suther Stiles of Elliot 
street who received a severe 
burn on his leg In the Welding 
Department of a firm at Water- 
town where he was employed, 
has been confined to his home 
for the past ten days. 

At the Annual Business Meet- 
ing of the Second Baptist church 
the following officers were elec- 
ted for the year of 1946: Clerk, 
Mrs. Horace Coverette; Treas- 
urer, Mrs. Porley A. Hilliard: 
Deacon for three years, Mr. Noel 
Ro'berts; Superintendent of 
Church School, Rev. Suther 
Stiles; Collector, Mrs. Irene 
Walker; Auditor, Mr. Walter 
Stacy; Flower Committee, chair- 
man, Miss Madeline Young. * 

Ph.M 1-c, W. Clifford Fisher is 
visiting his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. George T. Fisher of Chest- 
nut street. 

E.M. 1-c, Thomas McLean of 
the U. S. Navy who has returned 
to Norfolk Va. after a year’s 
service in the Pacific area is en- 
joying a two-week’s furlough 
w’ith his mother, Mrs. E. Mc- 
Lean of Pette street. 

Lt. John S. Proctor of % the U. 
S.N.R. who has been serving as 
physical instructor in training 
camps has received his honor- 
able discharge and is residing 
with hi?? mother, Mrs. John Proc- 
tor of Hale street. Mr. Proctor 
has returned to his former posi- 
tion as a 1 member of the faculty 
of the High School in Weston. 
Mass. 

Regular services of worship 
will be held at the Stone Insti- 
tute on Sundays at 4:00 p.m., 
through the generous co-opera- 
tion of brother ministers 
throughout the city. On Sunday. 
February 10, Rev. A. I\. Fill- 
more of the Second Baptist 
church will be the speaker. Rev. 
W. Henry Shillington of th^ 
First Methodist church officiated 
on February 3. 

The Board of Education of the 
First Methodist Church School 
met in the church parlor on 
Tuesday, February 5, at 8:00 
p.m. 

The Woman’s Society of Chris 
tian Service will hold their 
monthly meeting on Thursday. 
February 7, from 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. Sewing and Missionary 
program in the morning. After- 
noon, Sewing, Business Meeting. 
Members are invited to bring a 
box lunch and hot coffee will he 
served. 

The Flower Guild of the First 
Methodist church will meet at 
the home of Miss Isabel Young 
of 1272 Boylston street on Tues- 
day, February 12 at 8:00 p.m. 

A Special Meeting of the Of- 
ficial Board of the First Metho- 
dist church will be held in the 
Chapel on Wednesday. February 
13. at 7:45 p.m. for the purpose 
of considering carefully the 
building of a new parsonage and 
a new parish house. 

Rev. W. Henry Shillington will 
preach on Sunday at the First 
Methodist church from the topic, 
“Carry On." Troop No. 14, Boy 
Scouts will be guests at this 
service. 

Rev. Joseph DeSona, New Eng- 


Art Exhibit at 
Newton Centre 
Woman's Club 

An exhibition of lithographs 
by Mrs. Ella Fillmore Lillie will 
be shown in the Art Gallery of 
the Newton Centre Woman's 
Club from February 8 through 
February 21, daily except Sun- 
days from 2 p.m. until 4:30 
p.m. 

Mrs. Lillie attended the School 
of Fine Arts in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, her native state. Her 
studio at present is on Dorset 
Mountain in Danby Township, 
Vt. 

Among the public collections 
which exhibit Mbs. Lillie's prints 
are, The Library of Congress in 
Washington, D. C.; The Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts; and the 
Avery-Morgan Museum in Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

The principal awards received 
by Mrs. Lillie for her work are 
from the Library of Congress, 
the Hoosier Salon, the North- 
west Printmakers, Oklahoma 
City Lithograph Annual, and 
the Southern Print Makers. 

The prints are drawn on the 
Kelheim stone, a limestone 
mined in the Jura Mountains of 
Bavaria and are printed, by 
hand on a lithograph hand-prov- 
ing press. 

Mrs. Walter D. Knight is in 
charge of the exhibition. The 
patronesses are: Mrs. Ralph G. 
Hudson, Mrs. Martin Connelly, 
Mrs. Ralph B. Emery, Mrs. W. 
Cornell Appleton. Mrs. Keith 
Brown, Mrs. W. T. Chase, Jr., 
Mrs. Vaughan Dabney, Mrs. El 
mer Davis. Mrs. Charles Denni 
son. Mrs. Louis Fitch, Mrs. R, 
R. Gorton. Mrs. Harold Jaques, 
Mrs. Harold Keller, Mrs. Wil- 
liam C. Loring, Mrs. S. Hardj 
Mitchell, Mrs. Harry M. Rani 
say, and Miss Bessie L. Taylor 


prising Section 64, Block 9, Lot 
12. Ward 6. 

#87848. David Suvalle, changing 
real estate from General Resi- 
dence District to Business 
District, land bounded north- 
erly by Cook Street, south- 
easterly by Boston and Albany 
Railroad, northwesterly bv 
Business Zone, northerly and 
westerly by lot line of #60 Cook 
Street, being Section 56, Block 
15, Lot 8, Ward 5. 

Attest : 

FRANK M. GRANT, 

City Clerk. 
Notice Is hereby given by the 
Planning Board that it will hold 
a public hearing on the proposed 
amendments to the Zoning Or- 
; dinance of the City of Newton 
I described in the foregoing notice 
j and at the same time and place, 
under the provisions of Chapter 
320 of the Acta of the General 
Court of 1941. 

AttMt 

HERBERT J. KELLAWAY. 

Chairman, Planning Hoard 

I l t-imi.il> 1, nil 


Newton 


Herbert J. Callahan of 25 
Shorncliffe road who served in 
the U. S. Navy as Storekeeper, 
2 c, received his discharge at. th« 
Fargo Separation Center, Bos- 
ton last week. During his 31 
months of service he was in the 
Southern Pacific area for about 
two years, and received the 
Asiatic, Pacific and Victory 
awards. Before entering the 
service he attended Boston Uni- 
versity and has returned to his 
studies there. 


land Representative for the In- 
ternational Christian Leper Mis- 
sion will give stereopticon pic- 
tures. 


COMMON' WKAI.TH OK 
MASSAC II I’SKTTS 

Middlesex, ns. I’HOliATH COURT 
Th Stephen John Moylan. Donald H. 
Boy I an, Alan Al. Boylrm, Richard E. 
Roy la n and Barry Al, Hovian, minor**, 
Elizabeth Boy Inn Sullivan. J. Don- 
nell Sullivan. Katherine A. Bovlan. 
Carol Boy Ian Birtwell and David 
BUT wet I, all of Newton, in said 
County, and Mary U. Roy Ian, of said 
Newton. Individually, and as she la 
administratrix of the estate of 
Stephen .1. Iioylitn. 
late of said Newton, deceased. 

A |ift it Inn lias been presented to 
said Court by Daniel .1. Ib.y Ian, 
liruylng that a specific performance 
of an agreement for the conveyance 
of an Interest In real estate entered 
into by Stephen J. Boyinn Into <>f 
Newton In said County of Middlesex, 
deceased and said petitioner may be 
decreed, and the administrator of tlio 
estate of tin Id deceased be ordered 
to convey certain real properly sit- 
uated in Winthrop invUte County of 
Suffolk to said petitioner agreeably 
to the terms of said agreement. 

If you desire to obje. t thereto you 
or your attorney should tile a written 
appearance In said Court al Cam- 
bridge before leu o'clock in the fore- 
noon on the twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary 1040. the return day of this 
citation and also file an answer or 
other legal pleading within twenty- 
one days thereafter. 

Witness, .1 oli 1 1 C, I.eggat, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, ibis 
first dav of Februatx in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and forty-six. 

l.OKINC I*. JORDAN, 
(N) f7-14-21 , Register. 




How Would 
You Like to 
Own a part of 
Your Bank?’ 


Do you know that a Co-operative Bank be- 
longs — lock, stock and barrel — to the 
people who save their money in it? 

With every dollar you save, you acquire 
a profit-earning interest In your bank. At 
regular intervals you receive liberal divi- 
dends on your savings. 

* Never in 68 years of successful operation 

has a shareholder of a Massachusetts Co- • 

operative Bank lost a dollar of his savings. * 

Hundreds of thousands of people are sav- 
ing hundreds of millions of dollars in this 
way. Today would be a good time for you 
to start. 

ASK THE BANK NEAREST TO YOU 

AUBURNDALE COOPERATIVE BANK 

307 Auburn Street, Auburndale 

NEWTON COOPERATIVE BANK 

305 Walnut Street, Newtonville 

NEWTON SOUTH COOPERATIVE BANK 

Newton Highland! 

COOPERATIVE BANK 

West Newton 


1156 Walnut Street, 

WEST NEWTON 

1308 Washington Street, 


ALWAYS CHOOSE A COOPERATIVE BANK 


* 



PAGE riVE 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 7. 1946 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


Adm. Nimitz Sends 
Greetings on U.S.O. 
Fifth Anniversary 

— o — 

The following message from 
Fleet Admiral C. W. Nimitz, 
Chief of Naval Operations was 
sent to the USO, Washington, 
D. C., Council and to USO gen- 
erally, on the occasion of the 
Fifth Anniversary of Uso. 

"On this Fifth Anniversary of 
the USO it gives me great pleas- 
ure to send my greetings to the 
USO Council of Washington, D. 
C\, and to the officers, profes- 
sional staff and the thousands 
of volunteer workers of your 
splendid organization. I am hap- 
py to express the Navy's appre- 
ciation and thanks for • your 
splendid services to the person 
nol of the Navy, Marine Corps 
and Coast Guard. As Chief of 
the Bureau of Navigation in 
1941, with responsibiiities for 
the establishment of a compre- 
hensive welfare and recreation 
program for Naval personnel, I 


welcomed the formation of the 
United Service Organizations In 
February of that year. Later, 
as Commander-In-Chief of the 
Pacific Fleet and the Pacific 
Ocean areas I had the opportun- 
ity to observe the operations of 
the many USO activities in Ha- 
waii and to appreciate their out- 
standing contributions to the 
morale of the personnel of the 
Armed Forces under my com- 
mand. So, on behalf of these 
personnel I extend the thanks of 
the Navy and a hearty and sin- 
cere, 'Well done USO’.” 

(Signed) 

C. W. Nimitz 


February 6, 1946 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEET- 
ING IN LIEU OF THE AN- 
NUAL MEETING OF NEWTON- 
WELLESLEY HOSPITAL ANI) 
OF TRUSTEES' MEETING 
A special meeting in lieu of 
the annual meeting of Newton- 
Wellesley Hospital will be held 
on Thursday, February 14, 1946, 
at 4:45 p.m. at the Nurses’ j 
Home, for the purpose of elect- 
ing additional members of the ! 
Corporation, trustees and ofil- 1 
cers for the ensuing year, and ; 
of transacting such other busi- 
ness as may properly come be- 
fore the meeting. * 

Immediately following the 
meeting of the Corporation, the ; 
regular meeting of the Board 
of trustees will be held for the 
purpose of electing Trustees to 
fill vacancies in its own member- 
ship, for the election of a Board of : 
Governors and of the several I 
committees authorized under the 
by-laws, and to transact any 
other business which may prop- 
erly come before the Trustees’ 
Meeting. 

C. R. CABOT, Clerk. 
Advt. Feb. 7, 1946 


COM MON WEALTH OK 
MASSAC II I’NKTTN 

Middlesex, URuHATK COUP.T 

To 

Hubert Leslie 31 or Hay 

of Ussex Junction, In th« State of 

Vermont. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife, Floy Hamilton 
•Morwnv praying tlrnt ;i divorce from 
t he bond of matrimony between her- 
self and you he decreed for the rnuae 
of cruel uml abusive treatment and 
prating for custody of and allow- 
ance for minor child. 

If you desire to -object thereto you 
or your attorney should tile a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge within twenty-one days from 
the first day of April 1946, the return 
day of this citation. 

Witness, John C I.eggul, Esqulrt), 
First Judge of said Court, this 
thirtieth day of January in the year 
one thousand nine hundred und forty- 


Hospital- 

(Continued from Page 1) 
and officers. There will be receiv- 
ed the reports of the several de- 
partments, and of particular in- 
terest a report of the progress be- 
ing made looking toward the en- 
largement of the hospital. 

At the trustees' meeting which 
follows the corporation meeting, 
the New Board of Governors will 
be elected as well as the standing 
committee for the hospital. 

Following the custom of sev- 
eral years’ standing, a Dutch 
treat dinner will be served at 6:30 
p. m. with the guest speaker J. 
W. Farley, President of the Child- 
ren’s Hospital in Boston. 

It Is anticipated that both the 
formal meetings and the dinner 
will be of more than usual in- 
terest as the reports will Indicate 
what our hospital has accom- 
plished in this period of recon- 
version and what It hopes and 
prospects are for the future. 


* SCOUTING FOR ALL BOYS 


(N) r:-H-2i 


CORING P 


JORDAN, 

Register. 


COMMON WEALTH OF 
MAKNACIf I'SKTTS 

Middlesex, ms. PROBATE COURT 

To nil persons Interested In the 
estate of 

Nettle 3L Thompson 
1hi« Ilf Newton In said County, da- 
ta* :■ sed. 

A petition ban been presented to 
said Court for probate of a eertaln 
Instrument purporting to he the last 
"ill of sold deceased by I In told 
Miller of Worcester In the County of 
Worcester and William R. Beli of 
Newton in said County of Middlesex, 
praying that they Ik- appointed ex- 
ecutors thereof, without giving h 
surety on their bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
nr your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on the twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary into, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggnt, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
thirtieth day of January In the year 
one thousand nine hundred and fortv- 
■Ix. 

. GORING P. JORDAN. 
(3017-14-21 Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
31 ASS AC II I'SKTTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons Interested in the 
estate of 

William P. rinlerlilll, 

late of Newton In said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by Boston Safe 
Deposit and Trust Comnnnv of Bos- 
ton In the County of Suffolk, and 
Margaret Underhill of Newton In said 
County of Middlesex, praying Hint 
they be appointed executors thereof, 
without giving a surety on their 
bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a writ- 
ten appearance in said Court at Cam 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the eighteenth day of Febru- 
ary 194fi, the return day of this cita- 
tion. 

Witness. John C. I .egg.it. Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-third day of January in the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

GORING P. JORDAN, 

<X» J31 - f“. 14 Register. 


Case No. 9341 Mlsc. 

T II K CO 31 31 ON W K A l.T II OF 
31 ASSACIII HRTTN 
LAND COURT 

(SEAL) In Equity 

To Arthur M. Palmer and Una M. 
Palmer, of Newton, In the County of 
Middlesex and said Commonwealth ; 
and in all whom it may concern: 

Waltlmm Federal Savings and Loan 
Association, a duly existing corpora- 
tion, having an usual place of busi- 
ness In Wallham, in said County of 
Middlesex, claiming to he the holder 
of a mortgage covering real property 
in that pail of said Newton, culled 
Newton Highlands. numbered 209 
Winchester Street, given by the de- 
fendants to the plaintiff, dated Jan- 
uary 17, 1944, recorded with Middle- 
sex South Deeds, Book 6738, Page 
44S, lias tiled with said court a hill 
in equity for authority to foreclose 
said mortgage in the manner follow- 
ing- by entry and possession and ex- 
ercise of power of sale. 

If you are entitled to the benefits 
of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil 
Relief Act of 1940 its amended and 
you object to such foreclosure you 
or your attorney should tile :i written 
appearance and answer in said court 
at Boston on* or before the fourth 
day of March I94G, nr you may he 
forever barred from claiming that 
such foreclosure Is Invalid under said 
act. 

Witness, JOHN E. FENTON. Es- 
quire, Judge of said Court this twen- 
ty-fifth day of January 1946. 

ROBERT R. FRENCH. 
Advertisement Recorder. 

February 7. 1946 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
31 ASS AC1I L'SF.TTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of 

It utli G. Ollmuspii 

lute of Newton in said County, rte- 
eivisod. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
Instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by Atlee I., 
Percy of Newton In said County 
praying that he be appointed execu- 
tor thereof, without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
nr your attorney should file a written 
appearance in qald Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o’clock in the fore- 
noon on the twenty-seventh day of 
February 1946, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggnt, Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this 
second day of February In the year 
one thousand nln<* hundred and forty- 
six. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

Of) fT-14-21 Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
31 ASNAU II UHETT8 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 
To all persons Interested 'In the 
estate of 

(Urn Goodwin Huntress 

late of Newton In said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
Instrument purporting to he the Inst 
will of said deceased by Kathleen 
Huntress Henlnger of Davenport in 


the State of Iowa, praying that she , • . 

he appointed administratrix with the j or bV law, shall perform SUCH 
will annexed of said estate, without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 


or your attorney should file n writ- 
ten appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the eighteenth day of Febru- 
ary. 1946, the return day of this cita- 
tion. 

Witness, John C. I.eggat, Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-third day of January In the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LORING P. JORDAN, 

(N) J31-f7.lt Register. 


duties as the Executive Vice 
President may direct. 

Fifth: To transact any other 
business that may properly 
come before the meeting. 

CHESTER L. HARRIS, 
Clerk of the Corporation. 

Newton, Mass. 

February 4, 1946 

Advertisement 

February 7. 1946 _ 

'Em 



gr 1 

-rj: 


U03I3ION WE ALTH OK 
>1 \8SAU1I I'SKTTS 

Middlesex, ss. PRORATE COURT 

persons interested In 

estate of 

f'lmrles S. Nelson 
lute of Newton In said County, 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
snid Court for license to sell »t pri- 
vate sale certain real estate of said 
deceased. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney .should file a written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary 1946, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggnt. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this 
thirl v-first day of January In the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
fort> -six. T ORTNn ,, JORDAN. 

(N) f7 -14-21 Registe r. 

('031 MON W E A l.T II OF 

M \SS\CHI SI ITS 

Middlesex, ss. PRORATE COURT 

To all persons Interested in the 
estate of 

Bertram I). Sumner 

late of Newton In said County, de- 
eased. ... ... 

The administrators with the will 
annexed of said estate have presented 
to said Court for allowance their 
•cond account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file n written 
appearance In said Court at ' nnt- 
brldce before ten o'clock In the- foP- 
noon on the twenty-seventh day or 
February 1946, the return day of this 

CI WIMwm. -If- 1 '" r '- 1-mat R-nulw. 

FlrstvTudge of said Court, thl* fourth 
day of February In the year one thou- 
sand nine hundred and forty-six 
LORING 1 . JORDAN, 
l N' i f 7 - 14 - - 1 I*' l: ' '' 

NKAVTON WALTHAM BANK 

and trust company 

To the Stockholders of the 
Newton-Waltham Bank and Trust 
Company: 

The Annual Meeting of the 
Stockholders of the Newton- 
Waltham Bank and Trust Com- 
pany will be held at the Newton 
Office of the Company. 282 
Washington Street, Newton. 
Massachusetts, on Wednesday, 
February 13, 1946. at 4 o’clock 
P.M., for the following purposes: 
First: To elect the directors and 
a clerk for the ensuing year. 
Second: To elect an Examining 
Committee in accordance with 
Article 7 of the By-Laws. 
Third: To amend Article 1, Para- 
graph 1, of the By-Laws with 
respect to annual meeting 
place of the Stockholders. 
Fourth: To Amend Article 3, 
Paragraph 3. by adding a now 
sentence as follows: 

All officers of the corporation, 
other than the Chairman of 
the Board and the President, 
whose duties shall not have 
been prescribed by these By- 
Laws, the Board of Directors, 



American Brotherhood 
Week February 17-24 

— o — 

American Brotherhood Week, 
proclaimed by President Truman, 
will be observed during the week 
of Washington's 1 -iday. Feb. 
17-24. The theme for this 13th 
annual nationwide observance, 
sponsored by the National Con- 
ference of Christians and Jews, is 
"In Peace As In War Team- 
work." 

President Truman, in a mes- 
sage to the National Conference 
declared: “The armies of the 
United States won a conclusive 
victory over the forces of tyranny 
which exploited racial and re- 
ligious hatred to divide the world 
and destroy freedom. The world 
of the future must be built on the 
foundation of the recognition of 
the dignity and rights of each in- 
dividual, whatever his race, creed 
or national background. I hope 
that in every community through- 
out the country our people will 
meet together to rejoice in the 


COMMON WF X l.T H OF 
'1 \«4*A( H I SKT r* 

! Middle***. — PROBATE < (,r 

Tu «I1 |j«non* inU-n-Mni in 

1 *•*•», it* of 

Andrew U. MieKeoik 

' lit* of Newton In County, 

l I rit-Ml. 

A petition h*K beta presented 
-Hi.l ''..nr;, praying that Mar 
* Lord of Newton in a aid Count-, 
appointed administratrix -.f ► 
without g vitig a ,*ur--: 


great nesa of the land which be- 
longs to all of us and to pledge 
themselves to the continuance of 
that loyalty which will unite our 
country a - the leader of peace 
and the happy home of all our 
citizens ” 

Harold E Stassen Is general 
chairman of Brotherhood Week, 
and the national board of gover- 
nors include, besides President 
Truman. Edward Stettinius, Jr., 
Gen. Marfl Clark; Gen. Jonathan 
Wainwright Fleet Admiral Ern- 
est J. King, Myron C. Taylor! 


Charles Evans Hughes, Jr.; Cor- 
nelius Vanderbilt. Whitney; Solo- 
mon Guggenheim Albert D. 
I>asker; Donald W. Douglas: Will 

H. Hays; Rev. Harry Emerson 
Fosdlck; Vice-Admiral Emery S. 

I. and Mildred McAfee Horton; 
Helen Hayes: Eddie Cantor; Paul 
G. Hoffman; David O. Selznick; 
and Carl Van Doron 

Communlty-w 1 d e observances 
will be held during the week 
under the direction of committers 
representing all religious and ra- 
cial groups. 


her 


oml. 


THE EXPLORER SCOUT 


THE CUB SCOUT 


Specialized phases of the Boy Scout Program have been devel- 
oped for bovs on three age levels. Cub Scouting is designed for 
boys 9, 10 and 11. Scouting in the Troop is for boys 12 to la and 
older. The Senior Scout Program, which includes Sea Scouts. Ex- 
plorers and Air Scouts, is designed for boys and young men la and 
older. Since 1910 more than 12,500,000 boys and men have been 
members of the Boy Scouts of America. 



If you dexlre to object thereto . • j 
■ nr vi, in attorney »hould file * v.:.-,rn 
tld < • It 

. 

noon on the twenty-fifth d«j f Feb- 
1 rnary 1946. th* return day • tb.« 
citation. „ 

W tue**, John C. Li-tfgat. Ltq'. • 
f 

Hurt v-flr-t <lnv of January ;n the ' - ■ ■ 
on* thousand, nine hundred and forty- 

LORING P. JORDAN. 






Here at Last 


PERSONAL CONTACT SERVICE 

> 

You need this kind of service some hour most 
every day. We save you T ime. Money and Energy. 


WE 

.... execute your business errands 


WE 

.... execute your household errands 


WE 

. . contact distributors for merchandise 


WE 

.... contact wholesalers for ports 


WE 

. . contact any account in Greater Boston 


WE 

. . transact certain business deals 


WE 

.... procure automob: e reg strations and plates 


YOU 

.... do not leave your home or office 


YOU 

. . . . dia BIG. 6190 for information 


YOU 

WE 

.... will appreciate this service 
....service Waltham Watertown, Wellesley, 
K-ewton and Brighton for Greater Boston 



Contacts 


OFFICE HOURS: 9 A. M. to 7 P. M. 

Automatic Time Saving Service 

DIAL BIG. 6190 — 35 Years Experience 



\ SAY II WITH FLOWERS 
THIS VALENTINE'S DAY ! 

and Remember Mother with 1 
a lovely potted plant fresh :| 
from our hothouses. 


In 


FOR "HER 

VIOLETS in HEART-SHAPED BOXES 
CORSAGES of GARDENIAS, ROSES, ORCHIDS or CAMELLIAS 

l‘ If ime Order Early 

K. G. MAGNUSON 

Florist 

waWILki . . . 


SPRING FLOWERS 


2020 COMMONWEALTH AVE. 
AUBURNDALE Tel. LAS. 0215 


f / a ll- ye« -r° un .thousands 


/ Vf 7 d activity of the 

An aU-ye^ rOU ° br . ng . ng in thousands 

Tfres^ats; *** 

otca,1 ° .— *•* addf 
many ° , England menus, 
variety to 


7 . rinc in Us 

*4*!/ / f n ad road U ro bnng 

. of t he New Haven B* 

Another big taS ' d summer visitors 

z - 500 ' 00 ° 1* of ft** s 

share of New Bg d bca rs so muc . 

. Ne w Haven B-aiir interested m »» ^ 

Because t c responsibility, wc people ^ 

, „ ssc ngcr carrying 1 thousands m P 

P of New Bngl-d. this year, our m0 dern M 

° L*fe«ed — ~ “ gracious a-*- 4 

"'1 on o,d« * ss -1 

c „„aV,Voncd eqoip ment . . . include ^ 

tIC „ds Vn , oioAw s f-'°' “V* 

' ,„ d Grill cars ’ P1 ' mo „ fences, 

-pointed D®«* » to offer Ration. 

w C bring 111 the '‘S r ° cen 

England* The more 

bll „g Jcpcnds upon yo 

On. prosper'!, *1 . El , gland. 




• • 







PACE SIX 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


DR. FRANK A. JASSET 

Podiatrist — Chiropodist 

Now Located at 

SOI CENTRE STRU T 

NATIONAL BANK BLDO. 

Niwltn Corner 

For Appointment* — Call RIO. 4360 


Curtains 



in lengths up to 
90 inches 

• COTTAGE SETS 

• BUREAU SCARFS 

»ml DOILIES 

Quality merchandise 
at reasonable prices 


The 

LAWRENCE 


SHOP 


1300 WASHINGTON STREET 
WEST NEWTON 
Tiro iloor i from 
ITril Nncton Theatre 


l At 

u 



JFedding 

Receptions 


are onr forte . . . 

and no wonder, for here at The 
Beaconsfteld we really enjoy these 
glamourous, happy events . . . 
take a great deal cf pleasure, a 
great deal of pride in arranging 
a Reception worthy of this most 
memorable occasion Why not 
let us help make YOUR Wedding 
Reception perfect : n every detail! 
We shall be glad to suggest 
menus and unusual decorations, 
or if you have special ideas you 
would like carried out, tell us 
about them . . , your wish is 
our command. One of our seven 
beautifully decorated party rooms 
will provide the perfect setting 
for your Wedding Reception. 

The OVAL DINING ROOM is 

popular for Luncheon and Dinner. 
The food is delicious, and you'il 
like the friendly, gracious atmos- 
phere. 

Luncheons ere from 80c to $1.25 
Dinners from SI. 25 to $1.75 


Telephone ASPinwoll 6800 

ROBERT B. STOCKING, 
General Manager 

Hotel Beaconsfield 

A Sheraton Hotel 


_ WEDDINGS 

Gaudin - Lewis 

— O— 

Announcement is made by Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbert J. Lewis of 803 
Watertown street, West Newton 
of the marriage of their daugh- 
ter, Miss Eleanor Mary Lewis to 
Paul H. Gaudin, Jr., of Los 
Angeles, California. The wedding 
took place on January 28 in Los 
Angeles. 

Mr. Gaudin was graduated 
from the University of Southern 
California and has received his 
discharge from the Naval Air 
Corps. 

Grayson - Thomson 

— o — ■ 

Miss Patricia Adrienne Thomp- 
son and William Morris Grayson 
were married on Saturday, Jan- 
uary 26th. A reception at the 
homo of the bride’s parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Edwin Howe of 
518 Walnut street, Newton ville, 
followed the ceremony perform- 
ed by the Rev. James DeWolfe 
Perry, Jr., of St. John's Episcopal 
Church. Newtonville. 

The bride wore a dress of rose 
beige, an Adrian original, a 
headdress of marching ostrich 
tips, and her corsage was of green 
and brown orchids. Given in mar- 
riage by her step-father, she 
was attended by her sister, Miss 
Shirley Ann Thomson, who wore 
London tan with matching acces- 
sories and carried green orchids. 
Miss Robin Shaw Thomson, also 
a sister of the bride, wore powder 
blue and carried gardenias which 
matched those worn in her hair. 
Leon Grayson, of Washington. 
D. C.. was the best man for his 
brother. 

The bride graduated from St. 
Anne's in Arlington and the New- 
ton High school. She was presi- 
dent of Tri-Hi-Y and a merpber 
of Kappa Phi. Mr. Grayson, son 
of the late Gen. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Leon Grayson of Savannah, 
Georgia, attended the eSvern 
Preparatory School, Severn, 
Maryland, and the University of 
Georgia, attended the Severn 
left for Florida and will be in 
New Orleans for Mardi Gras. In 
March they will return to Savan- 
nah. where they will make their 
home. 


ENGAGEMENTS^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Dom- j 
broff of West Newton announce 
the engagement of their daugh- 
ter. Miss Charlotte Dombroff to 
Joseph Byor, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Selik J. Byor of Brighton. 

Mr. Byer recently returned 
from overseas and was discharg- 
ed from the Navy after 
months of service. 



o\ tiii: inside 


hr MARVIN R. COULD 


55 


On The Inside 


Geary - Ingalls 

— o — 

On January’ 31. in the rectory 
of Our Lady of the Presentation 
church. Brighton. Miss Meredith 
Ingalls, daughter of Mrs. Lever- 
ett S. Tuckerman, 2d. of Lynn 
and Mr. Arthur W. Tngalls of 34 
Eliot Memorial road. Newton, 
became the bride of John Leo 
Geary, Jr. 

Mrs. Geary is a graduate of 
Lasell Junior College. Mr. Geary, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Geary of 140 Waverly avenue, 
Newton, was graduated from 
Boston University in 1940. He 
has recently returned from three 
and a half years of service in the 
Pacific where he served with the 
American Division. 


Newton and 

Brookline Social Center 

The Brookline Dental society 
held a meeting and dinner Jan. 28 
in the Gold room. 

The Citizens’ Committee of 
Brookline met in the Grand Ball 
room on Jan. 28. 

A meeting of The League of 
Women Voters of Brookline was 
held in the Grand Ball room on 
Tuesday. Jan. .9. 

A reunion of the Boston Col- 
lege class of 1939 took place in 
the Grand Ball room last week. 
Arrangements were made by Mr. 
E. G. Hall. 

A wedding reception was held 
in the ball room following the 
marriage of Miss Mary McNich- 
olas of Watertown to Nil Jf Caron 
of Clinton. 

A wedding reception was held 
on Sunday in the Gold room fol- 
lowing the marriage of Miss 
Mary Patricia Conley to Harold 
Lloyd Wascom of Walker, La. 


Bishop Hartman 
At Community 
Church Sunday 

— o — " 

"Public Opinion and Human 
Progress" will be the subject of 
the address to be given by Bishop 
Lewis O. Hartman at the service 
of the Community Church of 
Boston at Jordan Hall Sunday, 
Feb. 10th, at 10:30 a. m. Bishop 
Hartman is the New England 
Head of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church and former Editor of 
Zion’s Herald. He is National 
! Chairman of the American 
j Friends of Spanish Democracy. 

| The service will be conducted by 
the minister, Rev. Donald G. 
Lothrop, and the usual question 
period will follow. 


€tx/cru - J 

C0CKTA1LSDINNER 

dNK 0 * 


3 




FROM 5RM.: SUNDAY I 
fcgj-T* MUSIC BY MUZAK 



Tibbott, Moderator 
1st Church in Newton 

— o — 

David W. Tihhott of 27 Trinity 
terrace, Newton Centre was 
elected moderator at the annual 
meeting of the First Church in 
Newton, Newton Centre. Alan W. 
Burke and Jarvis Farley were 
elected deacons for 4 years, Leon- 
ard T. Jenney, deacon for one 
year: Deaconesses for one year. 
Mrs. G. Milton Benson. Mrs. 
Leonard W. Rowley. Miss Mary L. 
West; Clerk for one year, S. W. 
Wilder: Assistant Clerk for one 
year, Miss Marjorie H. Dunham: 
Treasurer for one year. Hans K. 
Fischer; Standing Committee, 
members at large, George W. Me- 
Creery, George E. Squier: Pru- 
dential Committee for four years, 
Edwin M. Scribner. Ross L. Tren- 
holm: Auditor for one year. Don- 
ald M. Eldredge: Music Commit- 
tee for three, years, Robert C. 
Casselman. 

COM MON W I Mill Ol 
M \ss \< II I n| i ts 

M u.lle f x, >■». PROHATi ; COI'IIT 

To 

Lnlt J Ol I uir Ion 

| of Mar* Hill. In the State of North 

A lihel ha* been presented to H.ilil 
•'•■Hirt i,v \.,ur hueli.ni'1. Larry Wood* 
1 ruff OvIiiRton praying that a divorce 
I from the h'-iid of matrimony between 
| hlmwlf and you ho «!*• reed for the 
cans,; ,,f cruel and uhimlvo treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In sal, I Court at Cam- 
1iridK« within twenty-one day* from 
| the twenty -lifth day of March 


the 


Wi 


Levin 


Kaqulr 


LOWING R J OH HAN 
UKj JJ1-I7-14 Register. 


Mr. and Mrs. Carl R. Eodoll of 
60 St. Mary’s street, Newton 
Lower Falls announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Miss 
Natalie Bedell to Gerard F. Lewis 
I of Portland. Maine, son of Mrs. 
i Morris S. Booth of Long Beach, 

I California and Harold S. Lewis of 
! Portland. 

Miss Bedell is a graduate of the 
Mary Brooks School, Boston. Mr. 
Lewis, recently honorably dis- 
charged from the Army Air 
Forces after serving for 29 
months in India and China, will 
enter the University of Califor- 
nia in the fall. 

— o — 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace E. Frink 
of 355 Newtonville avenue. New- 
tonville announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter. Miss 
Barbara Louise Frink to Norman 
Arthur Lounsbury. USNR. son of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Lounsbury of 
Arlington. 

Miss Frink is a cadet nurse at 
the Newton-Wellesley Hospital. 
Mr. Lounsbury attended Tufts 
College before entering the serv- 
ice and plans to resume studies 
after his discharge. 

— o — 

Mr. William H. McLaughlin of 
Milton announces the engage- 
ment of his daughter. Miss Mar- 
ion Louise McLaughlin to Dr. Ed- 
ward J. Craffey, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. P. J. Craffey of 32 Manor 
House road. Newton Centre. , 

Miss McLaughlin attended Bos- 
ton University. Dr. Graffey, who 
i is interning at the Newton- 
Wellesley Hospital. attended 
Georgetown University. Wash- 
ington. D. C., Tufts College and 
Tufts College Medical School. 

— o — • 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hanson of 
31 Bonnybrook road, Waban an- 
nounce the engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Betty G. Hanson 
I to James C. Nesbitt. Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Nesbitt 
of Dedham. 

! Miss Hanson was graduated 
I from Bradford Junior College 
and the Katharine Gibbs School. 
Mr. Nesbitt recently was dis- 
charged from the Army and has 
resumed his studies at Boston 
University. 

o— 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Smith 
of Arlington announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter. Miss 
Mae W. Smith to Frank L. Bus- 
well. son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis 
L. Buswell of 321 Kenrick street, 
j Newton. 

Mr. Buswell graduated from 
Tilton Junior College in 1941. He 
was discharged from the Army 
Air Corps after serving overseas 
with the 9th Air Force. He and 
Miss Smith plan a fall wedding. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Tocci of 127 
Linwood avenue, Newtonville an- 
nounce the engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Constance Tocci 
to Stanley S. Ferrara, son of Mrs. 
Clementine Ferrara of Boston. 

— o — 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Elliot 
Carter of Auburndale announce 
the engagement of their daugh- 
ter, Virginia Irene to Reynold 
Arthur Grammer, Jr., son of 
Mrs. Estella Hull Grammer of 
Newtonville and Mr. Reynold 
Arthur Grammer of Boston. 

Miss Carter and Mr. Grammer 
are graduates of the, Newton 
High School and they are both 
studying at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology where he 
is a member of the Alpha Tau 
Omega fraternity. 

NEW CITIZENS" 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Moss 
Wales 'Betty Roth) announce 
th^ birth of a son, Roger Martin 
Wales on February 3 at the 
Faulkner Hospital. 

Grandparents are Mrs. A. D. 
Roth of San Francisco and Mr. 
and Mrs. Quincy W. Wales of 
West Newton. 

. — o — 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard E. Wade 
i Rita E. Scipionei of Needham 
announce the birth of a son. 
Robert Stephen Wade on Febru- 
ary* 2 at the Richardson House. 

Grandparents are Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Scipione of Newton- 
ville and Mr. D. William Wade 
of Needham, formerly of Brook- 
line. 

— o — 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Morris 
Forman (Doris Rico Miller' of 
Pelhan, New York announce the 
birth of a daughter. Judith Rice 
Forman on February 3 at the 
New Rochelle Hospital. New 
Rochelle, New York. 

; Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Benjamin Dwight Miller of Wa- 
i ban. 

o 

Newton Center Woman 
"Put and Take" Winner 

— O — 

Mrs. Anna Foster of 61 Beech- 
er place, Newton Centre, was 
among prize winners on the Feb- 
ruary 3rd broadcast of the "Put 
and Take” quiz show on station 
WC’OP. Mrs. Foster submitted 
a winning question to be used 
in tin* quiz contest between (he 
Senate and House of the Massa 
chusetts legislature. 


By MARVIN K. GOULD 

After watching last week’s rehearsal of I he N.H.S. Drama 
Club play. "Kind Lady,” your reporter is convinced that the play 
is going to be really sensational after the "green" actors com- 
plete their training under the expert coaching of Mrs. Wiens. 
Just to mention a few of the cast who in my opinion will stand 
out opening night, Burt Schaffer, Bev Johnson, Gig Henderson, 
Jim Gibson, and Dick Littlefield. Good luck, stars of the future, 
and let’s hope that you will be as good, when the curtain rises 
for act 1, scene 1, as Francis Russell Hart III was last year. 

This year it was decided by the Senior Class that they would 
wear caps and gowns at their Graduation next spring. The color 
of the gowns has not yet been decided but it will be decided upon 
in the near future by the Executive Committee of that class. By 
the way this is the same Executive Committee that has not yet, 
after three weeks, made its decision concerning class reunions. 
Efficient little group isn’t it, Mr. Senior? 

Last Monday "Warning Cards" were issued at N.H.S. to all 
students whose marks are C warning or lower. One student told 
us that he had enough cards to play poker with. (Nfl Joe, I 
can’t play poker with you now.) 

Manly Kiley, ace track star asked us to give his pal Pete 
Connelly some free publicity. Even without Kiley’s suggestion, I 
intended to inform my readers that this Pete Connelly is the same 
boy who put the shot 43 feet 4 inches last week. This same 
fellow is Captain-elect of Newton’s 46-47 Football Squad. For 
once Kiley came up with a bright suggestion, but believe me 
Manly, this boy doesn’t need anyone to put his name in print as 
he has done it already with his feats of athletic skill. 

Bill “Red” Duffy and Warren Underhill claim that they are 
the best crooners in N.H.S. (Note: Heaven forbid) . . . Wally 
Ncvil entered the United States Marine Corps last week . . . 
Nick Buonato, ace goal tender of last year, and first string 
pitcher, informs us that he will go to Florida next month with his 
Dad to get in shape for the coming baseball season . . . What 
happened to Min Piscelli’s sweat shirt in Smitty's E Block wrest- 
ling Class? . . . Sidney "Red” Vaughn held open house to all 
N.H.S. students last Saturday night. It is rumored that Fred 
Springer "his dearest friend" did the inviting. Is this just propa- 
ganda Fred? . . . Lucas Foss of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
was an invited guest at last month’s Music Club meeting . . . 
The "Newtonian" subscription goal has been set at 2,000 copies 
. . . A new staff of Newton Student Canteen Officers will be 
elected by the Canteen members some time this month . . . Weeks 
Junior High School may be converted into another Senior High 
School. (Good idea) ... It is rumored that L.G. is headed for the 
license bureau with S.R. (The initials in the previous sentence 
stand for — (Alright, please lay that pistol down babe.) • 

This week's outstanding faculty member is Coach Warren 
Huston. Hustie was born in Newton, and he went to 
N.H.S. along with a lot of other people, but he graduated, in 
1933 to be exact. He was captain of football, basketball, and 
baseball while in the sacred halls of Newton's only High School. 
The next step in his career was to become captain of football 
and hockey while studying Physical Education at Springfield 
College. Now after years of hard work he is an instructor of 
Physical Education at N.H.S., Assistant Football Coach. Varsity 
Basketball Coach, and Assistant Coach of Baseball. This summer 
Hustie will be the playing manager of the Brattleboro ball club 
of the Northern League. This is the club that gave us Dave 
Ferris. M.R.G. 


I CHURCHES 

NORTH CONGREGATIONAL 
23 Chapel Street 
(Next door to Raytheon) 
Arthur II. Clarke, Minister 
M rs. Arvld Swenson, 

Soloist and Choir Director 
George Russell Loud, Organist 
Sunday, February 10, 1946 
10:00 A.M. Church School 
George Kent, Supt. 

10:45 A.M. Service of Divine 
Worship. Sermon Subject, "What 
Do You See?" Sermon to Jun- 
iors, "He's a Good Scout." 

LUTHERAN CHURCH OF 
THE NEWTONS 
Opposite the High ^School 
430 Walnut St., Newtonville 
Rev. Arthur H. Block, Pastor 
Church service, 10:45 a. m.; 
Sunday School, 9:30 a. m. 

Sermon Topic: The Human 
and the Divine side of the Food 
Problem. 


.THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1946 

RECENT DEATHS 


THE FIRST CHURCH OF 
CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

The subject of the Lesson- 
Sermon to be road in The Mother 
Church, The First Church of 
Christ. Scientist, in Boston, Mass- 
achusetts, and in all of its 
branches, on Sunday, February 
10. will ho "Spirit". 

The Golden Text, "The Spirit 
searcheth all things, yea, the 
deep things of God," is from I 
Corinthians 2:10. Other Bible 
citations include, "All scripture 
is given by inspiration of God, 
and is profitable for doctrine, 
for reproof, for correction, for 
instruction in righteousness: 
That the man of God may be 
perfect, throughly furnished un- 
to all good works" (II Timothy 
3:16, 17). 

The Lesson-Sermon also in- 
cludes the following passages 
from the Christian Science text- 
book, "Science and Health with 
Key to the Scriptures" by Mary 
Baker Eddy, them understood 
spiritually, for only by this un- 
derstanding can truth be gained 
.... It is this spiritual percep- 
tion of Scripture, which lifts 
humanity out of disease and 
death and inspires faith." (p. 

■ 547). 


Celebrate Golden 
Wedding 

— o — 

Mr. and Mrs. Bartholomew 
Lynch, of 285 Auburndale ave- 
nue, Auburndale, residents of 
Newton for the past quarter of a 
century, celebrated their golden 
wedding on Sunday, February 
third. Mr. Lynch, a native of 
Brasher Falls, New York, and 
Mrs. Lynch, the former Alary 
Elizabeth Fallon of Lynn, were 
married in Dorchester fifty years 
ago. 

Gold Star parents of World 
War 1, their surviving son, Al- 
fred T. Lynch, recently received 
his discharge from the United 
States army after two years’ 
service. Two grandsons are serv- 
ing in the armed forces, Pvt. Wil- 
liam H. Whippcn, now stationed 
in the Aleutians, and Lieut, (jg) 
Leo J. Hession, on duty in Carri- 
bean waters. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lynch were 
guests of honor at a reception 
and buffet supper at the home of 
their daughter, Airs. John V. 
Hession. of Waban. Fifty guests 
were present, and they received 
numerous gifts, flowers, and con- 
gratulatory telegrams. Gold and 
white predominated in the dec- 
orative scheme. Miss Dorothy 
Whalen of Waltham' and Airs. 
Gerald V. Quinnan of Waban 
served as pourers. 

Newtonville Methodist 
Women Welcome 
New Members 

— o — 

A tea, to welcome new mem- 
bers, was given by the Woman’s 
Society of Christian Service of 
the Newtonville A1 e t h o d i s t. 
church. Wednesday. January 30, 
with Mrs. Howard F. Selby, 

| chairman of the Fellowship Com- 
mittee, in charge. 

Group Chairman serving as 
ushers were: Mrs. William Hal- 
! liday, Mrs. Howard Pease, Mrs. 
P. A. Croney, Mrs. William Fish. 
Mrs. Carl Swan. Mrs. H. R. Ales- 
erve. tylrs. C. K. Conover. Mrs. 

; C. F. Hooper. 

Pourers were officers of the 
Society and included — Mrs. Wil- 
liam Rich, Mrs. Arthur Straw- 
son, Mrs. Paul Lockwood, Airs. 
Fred Dodge, Mrs. Lyman Whit- 
comb, Mrs. Robert Bruee, Mrs. 
, Walter Burt, and Mrs. Atlee 
I Percy. 

Music was furnished by Airs. 
Albert Kreider, violinist and 
Mrs. Elinor Vaughan Smith, 
pianist. Mrs. William Fish, con- 
tralto, sang several selections 
with Mrs. Hamilton Gifford ac- 
companying. 

A meeting to complete plans 
for the formation of a new 
group in the Woman’s Society of 
Christian Service was held at the 
Newtonville Methodist Parson- 
age on Friday evening, February 
1. Mrs. Ralph McKee was ap- 
pointed Chairman of the group 
which is to be known as Group 
I Seven. 


Grace Episcopal 
Church Elects Officers 

— o — ■ 

j At the annual meeting of the 
Grace Episcopal Church, Newton, 
the following parishioners were 
elected members of the corpora* 

i tion: Alfred W. Barr, Mrs. Alfred 
W. Barr, Gordon B. Guptill, Miss 
Janet A. Hannington, Harold L. 
Keenan, Aliss Jane Mansfield 
and Percy Trundle. 

Julius W. Kohler was elected 
a vestryman for two years to fill 
the vacancy caused by the resig- 
nation of Major Sylvester B. 
Kelley: Chosen vestrymen for 
three years were Leverett D. G. 
Bentley, Alfred W. Bollertback, 
Horace W. Cole, and Gordon B. 
Russell. Delegates to the Dioces- 
an Convention will be Elliott B. 
Church, William V. M. Fawcett, 
Lyman H. Reynolds, and Gay 
Gleason, alternate. Chosen dele- 
gates to the annual meeting of 
the Archdeaconry of Lowell were 
Mrs. Kenneth L. Carr, Mrs. 
Charles F. Hooper, Mrs. Gordon 
B. Guptill and Mrs. Harold R. 
Smith, alternate. 


CENTRAL CONG. CHURCH 
OF NEWTON 
Newtonville 

Rev. Randolph Seaman Merrill, 
Minister 

Mrs. Russell F. Baker, 
Director of Education 
SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 10 
9:30 A.AI. Special Church 
School Assembly. 

10:50 A.AI. Worship service 
with sermon. "You and Who 
Else?”, by Rev. Randolph S. 
Merrill. 

7:00 P.M. Young People’s So- 
ciety. 

TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 12 
8:00 P.M. Standing Committee 
Meeting. 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14 
The Evening Group of the 
Woman’s Association will have 
supper and a White Elephant 
Sale. Husbands are invited. 


o— 


NEWTON CORNER 
METHODIST CHURCH 
Everett L. Farnsworth, Minister 

Public Worship Service Sunday 
at 10:30 A.M. Sermon Subject, 
"A Man With Another Spirit." 
Church School for Bible Study 
at 11:50 A.M. Youth Fellowship 
; Group at 6:45 P.AI. 

The Young Married Couples 
| Club of the Newton Corner 
Methodist Church will conduct 
a Valentino Party at the Y.M. 

| (’.A. Building Wednesday Night 
February 13th at 8 o'clock. All 
members of the* Youth Follow- 
! ship Group, Young Married 
j Couples of the church and Par- 
ish with all returned Service 
men are invited. 

The February Meeting ot the 
Womans Society of Christian 
Service of the Newton Corner 
Methodist Church will be held 
Tuesday Night at 8 o’clock in 
the church parlors. Hostesses, 
The Friendly Circle. Devotions, 
Mrs. Gordon S. Conrod. Guest 
speaker, Mrs. K. Paul Yphantis, 
Subject. "I Was In Greece When 
| Hitler Caine." 


THE ELIOT CHURCH 
OF NEWTON 

Dr. Ray A. Eusden, Minister 

SUNDAY, 9:30 Primary and 
Junior Departments of the 
Church School. 

10:45 Morning Service of Wor- 
ship with sermon by the min- 
ister. 

10:45 Nursery and Kinder- 
garten Departments of the 
Church School. 

12:05 Young People's Divi- 
sion: Junior High, High School 
and Eliot Round Table. Some 
i of the great Lincoln poetry will 
he read by Miss Joan Leonard 
; and Miss Betty Tobey illustrat- 
ed with stereopticon pictures. 
Richard Dodge and Ronald Jones 
will be the leaders. 

5:00 Meeting of the Inter- 
Church Youth Council. 

6:30 The Four-Fold Club will 
meet with Mr. and Mrs. Rich- 
ard H. Lee, 206 Church street. 
There will be a panel discussion 
by former Eliot servicemen led 
by Air. Marvin B. Perry, Jr. and 
Air. John D. Eusden. All young 
people, especially those in the 
service, are cordially invited. 

7:45 Aleeting of the Board 
of Religious Education in the 
: minister’s study. 

AIONDAY. 10:00-4:00 Red 
Cross Sewing Unit. 

6:30 Fathers, Sons and Daugh- 
ters Night of the Eliot Men's 
i Club. 

TUESDAY, 2:30 Group 1, 

! Airs. Thomas V. Cleveland, lead- 
er. will meet with Mrs. Chester 
Smith, 61 Waverlay avenue. Mrs. 
Logan Roots, wife of a medical 
missionary in China, will speak. 

7:45 Meeting of the Chuch 
Committee. 

WEDNESDAY. 3:30 Junior 
Choir rehearsal. 

5:00 Junior High Choir re- 
hearsal. 

7:30 Church Choir rehearsal. 

THURSDAY, 6:30 Church night 
supper. 

SATURDAY. 2:00 American 
League Basketball game: Eliot 
vs. St. John’s Alethodist. 

5:30 Special junior choirs re- 
hearsal. 

GENEVIEVE GADSDEN 

Airs. Genevieve Gadsden, wife 
of D. Webster Gadsden of 21 
Gerard Court, West Newton, 
died on Sunday, February 3, fol- 
lowing a brief illness. 

Mrs. Gadsden was in her 35th 
year. She was born in West 
Newton, the daughter of. Henry 
and Josephine (Bland) Mack. 

Besides her husband she is 
survived by two daughters, Hat- 
tie I. and Thelma E., a son, Dan- 
iel W. Gadsden, Jr., two sisters, 
Miss Loretta and Miss Bertha 
Alack of West Newton and four 
.brothers, Charles and LeRoy of 
West Newton. Herbert and Al- 
len, both serving with the Army 
overseas. 

Funeral services were held 
Tuesday afternoon at one o’clock 
in the Myrtle Baptist Church, 
West Newton. Burial was In the 
Newton Cemetery. 


DR. FRANCIS J. MULLIGAN 

— o — 

Dr. Francis J. Mulligan of 607 
Washington street. Newton, a 
member of the staff of the Now- 
ton-Wellosley Hospital and New- 
ton School Department physi- 
cian. died on Tuesday, Febru- 
ary 5. 

Dr. Mulligan was in his 44th 
year. He was horn in Newton 
and was graduated from Bos- 
ton University Medical School. 
He was a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society and 
Middlesex Court, M.C.O.F. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Mary (Pierce) Mulligan, 
four sisters and a brother. 

Funeral services will be held 
from his home on Friday morn- 
ing. A solemn requiem mass 
will be celebrated in the Church 
of Our Lady at 10 o’clock and 
burial will be in Calvary Ceme- 
tery, Waltham. 

THOMAS J. LINNEHAN 

— o — 

Funeral services for Thomas 
J. Linnehan of 128 Derby street, 
West Newton were held Monday 
morning from the Philip J. Mc- 
Hugh Chapel. A high mass of 
requiem was celebrated in St. 
Bernard’s Church by Rev. John 
A. Saunders. Burial was in Cal- 
vary Cemetery, Waltham with 
prayers by Rev. George J. Wil- 
j liams of St. Charles Church, 
Waltham. 

Air. Linnehan died on Thurs- 
day. January 31, following a 
long illness. He is survived by 
his wife, Mrs. Mary C. ( Dun- 
lea vy) Linnehan a brother Den- 
nis Linnehan and a sister, Cath- 
erine Linnehan, both of New 
York. 

ROBERT J. HURLEY 

— o — 

Robert J. Hurley of 239 Jack- 
son street. Newton Centre, father 
of the Rev. Robert H. Hurley, 
senior curate at the Sacred 
Heart Church, East Cambridge, 
died on February 3, at his home 
following a heart attack. 

Mr. Hurley was in his 71st 
year. He was born in Ireland 
and came to this country 60 
years ago. HP had been employ- 
ed as an inspector at the Cam- 
! bridge Housing project. 

| Funeral services were held 
Wednesday morning. A high 
mass of requiem was celebrated 
in the Sacred Heart Church, 
j Newton Centre at 10 o’clock, 
j Burial was in St. Joseph’s Ceme- 
; tery, West Roxbury. 

Besides his son Mr. Hurley 
leaves his wife, Mrs. Rose A. 
(Havey) Hurley. 


IRENE COLELLA 

— o — 

Funeral services for Mrs. Irene 
(Bibbo) Colella, wife of Orazia 
Coleila of 33 West street, New- 
ton were held from her home 
on Tuesday morning. A solemn 
requiem mass was celebrated in 
the Church of Our Lady at 9 
o'clock by Rev. Daniel J. Tag- 
lino assisted by Rev. John H. 
Quinlan, deacon and Rev. Ar* 
thur I. Norton, sub deacon. Bui> 
ial was in Calvary Cemetery, 
Waltham with prayers by Fr. 
Taglino. 

Mrs. Colella died suddenly on 
Friday, February 1. She was in 
her 51st year and had lived in 
Newton for 30 years. She was 
a member of S. S. Maria del 
Rozario. Fiore d’ltalia, Mount 
Carmen Society, St. Michael and 
St. Anthony Societies. 

Besides her husband she is 
survived bv two daughters, Miss 
Helen and Miss Lucy Colella, 
a son Paul, and two sisters, Mrs 
Concetta Lupo and Airs. Dolar- 
ata Mazzilli, both of Newton. 


DEATHS 


WALTER G. FERGUSON 

— o — 

Walter G. Ferguson of 132 
Rowe street, Auburndale died on 
Saturday, February 2 at the 
Faulkner Hospital, Boston. 

Mr. Ferguson was treasurer 
of the Anderson Products Com- 
pany of Boston. He was born 
in Boston and was graduated 
from the Boston Latin School 
and Dartmouth College. He was 
a trustee of the East Cambridge 
Savings Bank, past master of 
Washington Lodge A. F. & A. 
j M., a member of the University 
I Club, the Joseph Warren Com- 
| mandery, Knights Templar, the 
j Aleppo Temple of the Shrine 
! and the Scottish Rites. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Airs. Grace Ferguson, a son, 
Walter G. Ferguson, Jr., and his 
mother. 

Funeral services were held 
Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock 
in the Waterman Chapel, 495 
Commonwealth avenue, Boston. 
Burial was in the Newton Ceme- 
tery. 


Distinctive Flower 
Arrangements for Funerals 

K. Q. HIAGNUSON 

Florist 

2020 Commonwealth Avenue 
Auburndale - Tel. LAS 0216 


BURKE— On Feb. 3 at Waban, 
Joseph E. Burke, husband of 
the late Elizabeth Edwards 
Burke, of 497 Chestnut street. 

FERGUSON— On Feb. 2, at Au- 
burndale, Walter G. Ferguson, 
husband of Mrs. Grace Fergu- 
son, of 132 Rowe street. 

GADSDEN— On Feb. 3 at West 
Newton, Genevieve (Mack)* 
Gadsden, wife of D. Webster 
Gadsden, of 21 Gerard court. 

HAMMOND— On Feb. 4 at New- 
tonville, D. Milton Hammond, 
formerly of Woodstock, Ver- 
mont. 

LEGER— On Jan. 28 at Tinker 
Air Field, Oklahoma City, 
Capt. Eugene Loger, husband 
of Constance F. Leger, and 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
F. Leger of 47 Bothfeld road. 

LINEHAN — On Jan. 31 at West 
Newton, Thomas J. Linehan, 
husband of Mary C. (Dun- 
leav) Linehan, of 128 Derby 
street. 

McLEOD — On Feb. 7 at Newton- 
ville, William H. McLeod, hus- 
band of Berta (Hansom Ale- 
Leod, of 25 Lakeview avenue. 

McMURRAY — On Feb. 1 at West 
Newton, Nora J. (Lyons) Ate- 
Murray, widow of Owen Ale- 
Murray, formerly of Worces- 
ter. 

MELZARD-On Jan. 30 at New- 
tonville, Eliza F. (Nye) Mel- 
zard, widow of George O. Mel- 
zard, of 26 Kimball terrace. 

MORRISSEY-On Feb. 1 at 
Newton, Margaret (Hughes) 
Morrissey, wife of Alichael 
Morrissey, of 39 Newtonville 
avenue. 

MULLIGAN — On Feb. 5 at New- 
ton, Dr. Francis J. Mulligan, 
husband of Mary L. (Pierce) 
Alulligan, of 607 Washington 
street. 

QUINN — On Feb. 4 at Chestnut 
Hill, Margaret E. Quinn, widow 
of Thomas F. Quinn, of 93 
Manet road. 

STODDARD— On Feb. 3 at New- 
tonville, Annie L. Stoddard, 
widow of George E. Stoddard, 
of 70 Washington park. 

SUTER — On Feb. 5 at Auburn- 
dale, Marguerite (Friedrich) 
Suter, widow of Jules Suter, 
of 19 Maple street. 


SAY IT 
WITH 


Flowers 


from 

Eastman's 

FLOWER SHOPS 


NowtonvilU 
BIG. 6781 


Welle.I.y Hills 
WEL. 1440 


MRS. GEORGE P. FLOOD 

PAUL R. FITZGERALD 

JOHN 

FLOOD 

FUNERAL 

DIRECTOR 

TeL LASell 01 M 

•47 Waahlniton 81., Nawioa 


A.C R Rill NOE R • V.P. MAC KAY " 


The training and experience of many yeari of 
funeral directing of both A. C. Bellinger and - 
V. P. Mackay, qualify them to arrange a memorial 
in good taite and in keeping with family wishes. 

Rich g^&Bellinger 

SUCCESSORS TO V— "''BURT M. RICH ^ 

26-30 CENTRE AVE.* NEWTON, MASS.' 


CATE 

Funeral Service 

Serving This Community 
Sincm 1861 

Tel. BIG. 0170 

1261 Washington St. 
Woat Newton 


Distinctive Service 

51 LOCAL * SUBURBAN - DISTANT 
Non-Sectarian 

CIiurcFi. Home & Chnpc! Funerals 
At Price* For All Requirements 

Information & Estimates 

BOSTON - ROXUUKY • B HOOK LIKE 



h 


JIWaiemanAns 


d 



PAGE SEVEN 


.THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1946 


_THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


REAL ESTATE 


REAL ESTATE 


HOUSES 

WAITED 


CASH CUSTOMERS WAITING! 
List Your Property with a 

REALTOR 

HOWE ASSOCIATES 

OSA Commonwealth Avenue.. Newton Centra 

Call BIG. 6500 


MORTGAGE SERVICE 

If you are about to buy, build, or poRaibly refinance your present 
mortgage, consult a firm with a background of over 100 yearB 
of dependable service. Interest rates as low as 4%. Construction - 
permanent loans arranged, one title examination for both. Re- 
gardless of what type of mortgage you wish to arrange, be sure 
to consult us first. No commission charged. Prompt attention 
pi '<ured. Mortgage loan correspondents {or 

PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

WFNRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

REALTORS 

1297 Beacon 8treet, Brookline 46 - - - ASPInwall 1504 


SPECIAL NOTICE TO BUILDERS 


LOT OF LAND LOCATED AT 
CHARLES STREET (Rear) 

Auburndale— from 1*4 to 1 % acres. Very 
desirable. 

132 BROAD ST., BOSTON 
TELEPHONE HANcock 3968 
Residence — 77 Beaumont Ave., Newtonville-BIG. 7210 


FOR SALE 


M. J. Odence 


For . • • 

NEWTON 
REAL ESTATE 

. . . See 

Paul Harris Drake 

626 Commonwealth Ave. 
NEWTON CENTRE 

DECatur 1020 


FOR SALE 


For Real Estate Service 

NEWTON ESTATES 

BIGelow 1280 

Specialists in Real Estate 


FURNISHED ROOMS 


FOR RENT 

Furnished Heated Rooms 
at Woodland Golf Club 

Call LASell 1900 


FOR SALE 

Studio Couch S7.1.00 

^Mahogany Framed Mirror 42*flH *.10.0(1 
Mahogany Colonial Rocker .... S'. 1 '.(Ml 

Mfi" Pino Drop I,eaf Table .... >0.00 

llargains in Furniture 

SEELEY BROS. CO. 

757 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTONVILLE 
Tel. — BIGelow 7441 

FIREPLACE WOOD, oak. well 
seasoned. Any length. Will de- 
liver during next two mouths. .1. 
C. Walker, WAYland 11^ ring 3. 

nl-tf 


FOR SALE: Yarmouthport, 
Cape Cod, spacious 18th century 
house, plenty of charm, many 
fireplaces: Dutch oven; 3 modern 
baths; stables. One acre high, 
sightly land. Ocean view. Situ- 
ated on main street opposite fa- 
mous tea room. A profitable 
guest house, completely fur- 
nished. $9,000. Tel. BRAintree 
0284. j31-tf 


NEWTON CENTER: Pleas- 
ant corner room in refined pri- 
vate home on quiet street is now 
available to a business executive 
who desires to secure permanent 
accommodations. Near trains 
and centre. References request 
ed. Call BIG. 7823 Saturday, 
Sunday or weekdays after 6 
p. m. 

FOR RENT: Pleasant fur- 
nished room on bathroom floor. 
Convenient to bus and train. 
Continuous hot water, oil heat. 
LASell 1017. t'7z 


FOR SALE: Sled 55" Flexible 
Flyer Airline Chief. New condi- 
tion, $6.50. Pr. ladies ski boots, 
size 6, never worn, $1. Tel. Big. 
3293. f7z 

VoK SALE: Glenwood white 
enamel 4-burner gas range. Call 
Lasell 5133. 7 to 9 p.m. f7 

FOR SALE: Brown Frieze 
Lawson sofa also one clothes 
reel. Call Lasell 7168. t'7 


FOR RENT: Unfinished 
room for couple in private home 
between wton Centre and 
Newtonville. References. - Call 
Big. 9458 between 5:30 and 6:00 
p.m. f7z 


LOST AND FOUND 


LOST SAVINGS BANK BOOKS 

SarluifB Hunk* Hook* a* ll»ted briuw 
are lost ami npollcntlon hu» been made 
for payment* of the nccnunl* In ae» 
cordunre with See. Ill ( hap iiflO of the 
Art* of IBii.Y nnd amendment*. 

West Newton Savings Bank 
Book No. 1044 

Newton Centre Savings Bank 
Book No. 28527 

West Newton Savings Bank 
Book No. 24181 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
61589 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
75777 

Newton-Waltham Bank «Sfc Trust 
Co. Bank Book No. N-18108 
Newton-Waltham Bank and Trust 
Co. No. C-13674 

Newton-Waltham Bank and Trust 
Co., No. C-14585 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
92862 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
29684 

Newton Centre Savings Bank 
Book No. 27707 

West Newton Savings Bank Book 
No. 27274 

Newton Savings Bunk Book 
No. 92695. 

Newton-Waltlmm Bank & Trust 
Co. No. 5387. 

Newton-Waltham Bank Jfc Trust 
Co. No. II 4593. 

West Newton Savings Bank 
Book No. 19538. 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
84956. 

lost: in vicinity of Waverley 
Avenue, Newton. Angora tiger 
cat (male), 3-yea rs-old. Long 
curled hair in ears. White breast, 
large tall. Reward. Tel. leased 
5541. Mrs. Robert Keene. f7 

LOST: In Newtonville, photo- 
graph of young girl in photo- 
graphees mailing envelope. If 
found please ’phone Lasell 3651. 

17 


ENTIRE FURNISHINGS of a 
12- room house. To be seen at 19 
Willard Road, Brookline on Fri- 
day. Saturday and Sunday. Feb- 
ruary 8, 9, 10. Call Beacon 2321 
f7z 

FOR SALE: Underwood type- 
writer (standard) in good condi- 
tion. Call Longwood 5163. f7z 

$7800 - - 2 family house, 56 
Waverly Ave., Newton, near 
school, churches and transporta- 
tion. Excellent income possibili- 
ties if desired. Now occupied. 
Calk owner, Big. 3929. f7z 

FURNITURE FOR SALE 

UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY 

9-pc. brown mahogany dining 
room set. 4-pcs. Walnut bedroom 
furniture, also other small pcs., 
Including 9x12 Sahara rug. All 
in excellent condition. Call BIG 
elow 5386. f7-tf 


FOR SALE: Well established 
beauty salon in Wellesley. Ad- 
dress LB, Graphic Office. f7 

liOK SALE: Hot point electric 
range. In good condition. Tel. 
Dec. 8911. f7 

FOR SALE: White enamel 
Roper gas range with automatic 
pilot and oven control, also a 
large radiant gas heater for 
sale. Retasonably priced. Call 
Lasell 4911. f7z 


TOR SALE 


LIVING ROOM SET, gas stove, 
mirror for above fire place, 
drapes and other things. Call 

Mrs. Ascher, LAS. 5080. 18 


FOR SALE: Soprano saxo- 
phone; 2 pr. men's riding hoofs, 
size *9’ j; studio couch, all ex- 
cellent condition. Tel. Big. 0008 
after 6 p.m. f7z 

for SALE: Seven practically 

now shirts, Arrow, etc. Size 14' j 
neck, 37 sleeve. $20.. also 2 new 
white 16 'j shirts without collars. 
Tel. Big. 3991. f7 

I FOR SALE: Upright niahog- 
' any piano, plain case. Fine con- 
dition. Tel. Watertown 7473. f7z 

FOR SALE — NO DEALERS. 
In excellent condition. Antique 
Flax Wheel, $20. Also hand hair 
dryer, $10. Tel. Big. 8790. f7-2tz 

I FOR SALE: Skunk fur coat in 
good condition, size 16. Tel. 
Dedham 1528. f7z 

BABY CARRIAGE 
I Pre-war Whitney baby coach, 
1 wood body, midnight b’ *. Black 
, upholstery and hood. Chrome 
| trim. White rubber tires, excel- 
lent oondiVon, $10. Call Lasell 
0901 between 8 and 9 a.m. or 
p.m. f6x 

1931 NASH with heat m*. m 
running condition. Call Big. 6877. 


HELP WANTED 


HELP WANTED 


WANTED 


WANTED 


15 GIRLS 

For Marking and Sorting Department 

(Similar to Office Work) 

18 Years or over 

WANTED 

In Modem Laundry 

Pleasant Working Conditions 

NO SATURDAYS 

STEADY WORK GOOD PAY 

Apply 

GARDEN CITY LAUNDRY 

75 ADAMS STREET NEWTON 


HIGHEST AMOUNT of 

CASH 

FOR YOUR 

CAR 

WRITE, PHONE or DRIVE IN 

Need Any Repairing ? Expert Mechanic* AraSmiilr. 

MYRAN MOTORS, Inc. 

75 NO. BEACON ST., WATERTOWN WAT. 7000 


r 


Ward Maids — Floor-Kitchen Women 
Laundry Workers 

FULL OR PART TIME 

APPLY BETWEEN 0:30-11:00 A. M. PERSONNEL OFFICE 

Newton-VVellesley Hospital — Newton Lower Falls 


n 


200 CARS 
WANTED 

TOP PRICES PAID 

If in storage or in need 
of repairs, we may buy it. 

Gall LONgwood 1790 

Evenings LASell 0829 


W-A-N-T-E-D 

Old Furniture. China. Brle-a-Brae 
Hlcheit Prices Paid 

HITCHCOCK HOUSE 

14«l Washlnctoa St.. - - West Newton 
Call WALtham SI30-M 


90 

J 


RAPID 

EXPANSION 

• 

Necessitates 

OUR 

NEED FOR 

MORE 

GIRLS 

to Make 

*?ADI 0 TUBES 

45-HOUR WEEK 

Experience 
Not Necessary 

GOOD PAY 
During Training Period 

Employee’s Cafeteria 

Openings at 
Uoth 

NEWTON 

and 

WALTHAM 

PLANTS 

Apply at 

NEWTON EMPLOYMENT 
OFFICE 

55 Chapel St. 
NEWTON 


-MMMAOM^VVWWVWWVVVWVVVVM 

WANTED 

Young man or girl, 18-25, for 
clerk in Soda and Cigar de- 
partment of Newton’s busiest 
drug store. 

Steady position, pleasant work, 
good pay. 

Apply In Person 

HUBBARI) DRUG CO. 

425 CENTRE ST. NEWTON 


WANTED 

Clerk-Typist 

Ft XL TIME 

Apply »:S0 to II A. M. Personnel Office 

Newton-VVellesley Hospital 

NEWTON LOWER FALLS 


Wonderful Opportunity 

FOUR CURLS 

WANTED AT ONCF. TO TRAl.N 
| with one of America's leading cd inetlc 
' companies. Some sales experience ad- 
| v uable. Highly remunerative. Call 

Orrin White-KENmore 8379 


ANTIQUES WANTED 


ANTIQUES WANTED 
Reliable authority will pay highest 
prlcr* fur vour uld furniture, oriental 
rue*, rtilna. bra**, cupper, pew- 

ter. brume, kilver. Sheffield, chande- 
lier*. firearm*. Are »el*. told amt ■li- 
ter Jewelry. Write ua what you have. 
We will appralie fur you. 

n UKEUORY 

Ixo Hoyklun St., Iloiton • KEN lift 


Household Furniture 
Storage 

I'lauo*. trunk*, etc. In our new ton 
crele and brick modern warehau** 
Individual lurked room*. Separate 
■noth -proof room* for rue* and over- 
duffed furniture 

LIOKNKKD AND BONDEU 

Steffens Storage Warehouse 
197 Webster St.. Weal Newton 

LASol 2436 


WANTED: Woman two days 
a week for cleaning. Call Big. 
8085. n 


HOUSEKEEPER WANTED: 

Reliable to answer ’phone, care 
of house and cooking. No laun- 
dry. 3 in family. B. H. J., Graph- 
ic Office. t'7 


WANTED AT ONCE: Girl for 
general clerical work such as 
typing, keeping records, answer- 
ing telephone, etc. Pleasant 
work. Permanent position. Call 
Bigelow 4880 for appointment. 

17 


MISCELLANEOUS 


LINOLEUM REMNANTS - 
Suitable for small bathrooms and 
counter tops. Also large stock 
Armstrong asphalt tile, inlaid and 
Battleship linoleum, and metal 
edging. Call Johnson, STA. 6560 
25 Market St., Brighton. o5-tf 


RENT a Singer Sewing ma- 
chine for as long as desired. In- 
quire about our special rates 
Classes in dressmaking, home dec- 
orations, children’s clothes and 
make-over now forming; morning 
afternoon and even : ng classes. 
Singer Sewing Machine Co., 424 
’■ ’ Waltham. Tel. WA1. 


Moody St. 
3331. 


<12 tf 


RADIO REPAIRS at low prices, 
Newton Music Store. LAS. 0610. 

s27tf 


HAVE YOUR Sewing Machine 
serviced by our bonded service 
men in your own home. All parts 
and work guaranteed. Singer 
Sewing Machine Co.. 424 Moody 


ng 

St.. Waltham. Tel. WAL. 3331. 


d2tf 


SELL YOUR 

ROOKS 

, TO HALL - BIGelow 2888 

Eighteen li'iin in Newton 


DRY scrap lumber. 1 load $7.50 
sawed for fireplace, $12.50 bag 
wood 25c a bag or 5 for $1 taken 
Also a few cords of dry cord wood. 
Marshall C. Spring Co., Inc., 15 
River St., Newton Lower Falla 
WEL. 3100 a31-8ti 

BUTTONHOLES made at home 
by machine attachment. Phone 
for details and appointment. 
BIG. 1653. J31-2tz 

F. A. B. RANGE BURNER 
SERVICE: Burners Serviced and 
Vacuum cleaned. Prompt Serv- 
ice. Call Dec. 1494. f7-4t 



WANTED TO RENT: Welle 
sley or Newton single house, 
$100 to $150 monthly by veteran 
with wife and 14-year-old daugh- 
ter. Will sign lease with option 
to buy. Address Box LW, Graph- 
ic Office. i7 

WANTED: Housekeeper’s posi- 
tion for refined lady or middle 
aged gentleman. References ex- 
changed. Address 52 Palfrey 
Street, Watertown or Tel. Water- 
town 2818. f7z 

WANTED: Score of the Opera 
“La Travlata" on records. C. T. 
Blackey, 39 Elm Road, Newton 
ville. Lasell 8799. f7z 

WANTED: 2 or 3 rooms with 
kitchen privileges. Two American 
middle-aged people. Call between 
5 and 6 p.m. Las. 5395. f7-2tz 

VETERAN seeks drafting 
table for starting his own busi- 
ness. Do you have one in your 
attic or cellar that you will sell 
to me? Please call evenings, Big 
8783. t'7z 

APARTMENTS WANTED 

PHYSICIAN: Overseas veteran 
of 3 yrs. now in Boston for post 
graduate study desires unfur- 
nished single house, duplex, or 
apartment for one to two years 
Excellent references. Phone Wal 
tham 5028. jl7-4t 

REFINED middle-aged Amer 
ican couple with elderly mother 
want 5 • 6 • room unfurnished 
apartment any time before Jun° 
1st. Will take good care of your 
property: no pets. Write Gra 
phic, Box P. J. E. j24-3t7 

QUIET, ELDERLY COUPLE, 

without children or pets. Best 
references: require 2 or 3-room 
apartment on first or second 
floor in residential district by 
April 1. Tel evenings. BIG. 3677. 

j31-4tz 

EX-NAVAL FLYER and wife, 
anxious to rent unfurnished 
apartment or small house. Both 
college graduates. Good back- 
ground. No children. Permanent 
residence. Please call Lasell 
0343. f7-8:^ 

EX-ARMY CAPTAIN, now in 

permanent position, wife and 76- 
months-old daughter, desire 5- 
room unfurnished apartment. 
$45. Call Big. 2631. f7z 

YOUNG WAR WIDOW with 
small daughter wants heated 
apartment. 3 or 4 rooms in the 
Newtons. Tel. Lasell 2382. f7 

WANTED: Apartment of 2 oi 
3 rooms, furnished or unfurnish- 
ed by veteran and wife. Former 
Newton residents. Tel. Lasell 
8295. f7-2tz 

rental WANTED: Needham 
Wellesley-Newtons. Family. 4 
adults. House or apartment. 
$50-$65. Best references. Per- 
manent. Needham 2154-W. f7z 

WORK WANTED 

FORMER SPAR OFFICER de- 

sires position with opportunity 
to advance. College grad. Inter- 
ested in detail. Address DC., 
Graphic Office. Hz 

NURSE, practical, wants per 
manent position as nurse-corn 
panion, semi invalid, chronic or 
as housekeeper. Where other 
help is kept, no children. Drivers’ 
license, excellent references. Las. 
1516. 

HOUSEHOLD SERVICES 

Arthur C. Douglas 

CONTRACTOR 

Celotex Ceilings 
Repairing of all Kinds 

il Maplewood Nowtou t'rnlr* 

1. A Soil Wit 



ROOM WANTED 


BUSINESS MAN wants room 
in refined home. Also garage. 
Address, B. M. A.. Graphic Of- 
fice. J3l2t 

WANTED: Two furnished 

rooms with bath aiul kitchen 
privileges for two elderly ladles. 
Near Cabot School. Tel. Lasell 
5735. f7a 


EARL'S 

RANGE BURNER SERVICE 

Autu-PuUe |>ump* which pump oil from 
cellar to burner ami eliminate* carry* 
in* oil 

SOLD and INSTALLED 

NEW ana USED Ml KM K* fOR SAI.I 

Call EARL WALLACE, Prop. 
LASell 6345 

129 Qrasmerts 8t. - Newton 


Seeley Bros. Co. 

DISTINCTIVE I YIIOI HTtaiKO 
Window shade* 

Mattir** Maker* Antique* Holered 
Phone HIlieluM 7111 - E*l. It*0l 
7«TA Wktblntion at . Newlonvill* 


Insurance Executive 

Count 

■ 

e for i 

■ tiki 

Rood c*r» of house and iroundi p;.r,r..- 
HANcoek 8500. Ex: 680 durlnc W**ic 
of February 

household services 

P. E. COWAN 1 

Carpenter Roofer R 

Contractor | 

• PAINTING 1 

• REMODELING 
• MODERNIZING ] 

• REPAIRING 

1 8 1 Parker Si., .Net* ton Centre- 
Tel. BIGelow 5357 i 

1,1. ST.,, lit, ,|| W.rk Guir.nl,— 

Conrad A. Tjernstrom 

Interior and Exterior Painting 
Paperhanging, Kalsomlnlng 

19 Montfern Ave. Brighton 

P A I N T I N G - P A P E R II A N C. I N G 
also Ceilings 

FLOORS KI.IIM'IIED 

EXCELLENT WORK 
estimates given 

W. REYNOLDS 

BIGrlon V. II 

HOUSEHOLD CLEANERS CO. 

WINDOWS - FLOORS 

TOMPLETF 

HOI'SEHOI.n MAINTENANCE 

PHONE 

LAS 3337 or BIG 1527 

Y J>| Interior 
j| yl | Decorating 

m ■ •' 

M xV7<W Paintln* 

W - — 0 1*^— k | I , Paperhanfin* 

1 < riling, Kalso- 

- LJ f m,nrj s 

\ r y. Floor* Rrt:iii«bed 

Expertlv Done 71 

Prompt Srrvlee 

HAROLD P JOHNSON 

?5 Year* In Brlmout 

Call BEL.-nont 2667 

JOSEPH RICHARD 

FLOOR SANDING 
and REFINISHING 

Call W4Ltham 2821 -W 

Complete Exterminating 
Service j 

TERMITES. ANTS. INSECTS 
AND RODENTS 

JOS. E. LaGASSE CO. 

KEN. 21S1 or BIG. 3123 

WALL FLOORS 

HAFI RS SANPED-Kt FINISHED 

Painting & Decorating 
Paperhanging 

E. J. ELLARD 

10 Bradford Kd Uslrrlonn WAT. ,47* 

THE SERVICE CO. 

HERB SWANSON 

*-’> M\Y\U KO\n 

Id Yrur* I.Micrinii * 

Commercial — Domr.tic 

REFRIGERATION SERVICE 

ANY MAKE 

WAItham 5408-R 

NEEDHAM FLOOR SERVICE 

Specialist* In 

REFINISHING FLOORS 

W VSIIED - WAXED - POLISHED 

A l*o office and *tor* floor* 

A. Modern Equipment Used 

Eor Prompt Service — Call NEE tSTX 
WINDOWS CLEANED 

UPHOLSTERING 
Mattresses Made l'o Order 
Inner Spring Mattresses 

T. B. HAFFEY CO. 

For Wgahindon St and Ventre 8*« 
let. HlUrlow l*si F.tUbdibrd i.*v* 

R. A. Vuchon & Sons, Inc. 
REPAIR WORK 

Promptly Alten,(td ID 

Contractors and Hinklers 

22 Union St.. Newton Centre 
Tel. DECatur 0072 




OF ALL THE PERSIAN WORKS 

of arf perhaps none hold* a firmer place in the heart* •# the 
Pernarti fhemtelvet than their hand-woven rug* If it neediest 
to toy that they are equolly esteemed by people of tatte and 
refinement throughout the world A GREGORIAN RUG em- 
bodies oil the traditional traitt of this fascinating textile art. 
It is our oim to perpetuate and maintain the notive standards 
that are untpoilcd ond typically Periiorv New or old, such rugs 
satisfy one’s soul ond elevate one’s spirit. 

And when you purchase o GREGORIAN RUG, you ore buying 
a rug to be enjoyed in your pneration ond in that of fowr 
children. 

A FEW nCAIWTLES 

9 x21 ROYAL KA2V1N ... $1600 00 

9.10*18 ROYAL KAZVIN .. 1500 00 

8 *21 SARABAND 950 00 

8 7 *15 8 AFGHAN BOUKARA ... 500.00 

86 xl 3.2 TABRIZ 475 00 

7 *10.7 TABRIZ 350.00 

4.5 x 8 8 SAMARKAND ... 250 00 

3.8 xll BOUKARA 190 00 

3.7 x 4.2 SHIRAZ 90OO 

3.3 x 6.3 ROSE KURDISTAN . .. 110 00 

2.6 * 5 2 DERGEZIN ... 100 00 

3.7 X 6 2 CABISTAN 110 00 

4.2 x 6 FEREGHAN ... 175.00 

2.3 x 4.3 SHIRAZ . . . 35.00 

2 x 3 HAM A DAN 91 ATS at . . . 22.00 

5 6 xl 2.4 KARABAGH 550 00 

9 x12.1 ISFAHAN . 475.00 

3 x10.4 TABRIZ 190.00 

4 10x 9.6 AFGANSTAN . 100 00 

— AND MANY OTHERS — 

A Gregorian Hug today i« an heirhuun tomorrow 

Arthur T. Gregorian 

2306 Washington Street — Newton Lower Falla 
Telephone BIGelow 2553 

(Opposite Grove Street) 


PAINTING - PAPERHANGING 

INSIDE and OUTSIDE 

('.pilings ir hitened — Floor s Re-Finished 

DEPENDABLE, EXPERT WORKMANSHIP 

ESTIMATES, samples submitted 

Obligation 

SEYMOUR SILVER 

16 Arlington Road West Newton 

Telephone LASell 0496 

ESTABLISHED 22 lEtRS IN THE NEWTONS 


PAINTING 

PAPERHANGING 


INSIDE and 
OUTSIDE 


C*iNngs Whitened 
Floors Sanded and 
Reffnlshed 


WALLPAPER REMOVED 
by ELECTRIC MACHINE 


Fint Clast V ork 
Reasonable Price i 


FRANK E. O DEA 

400 California St., Newtonville 



BIG. 9661 


Where to BUY IT, RENT IT, SELL IT, 
or HAVE IT REPAIRED 


Anti(|iies 

Painting 



HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

for antique*. *ilver. brlc-a-br»c. 
china, (la**, picture* »nd furniture 

Call day or nicht 

M. MARCL'S. BIG. 0S43 

tS9 WALNUT STREET 
NEWTONVILLE— «r 

1ST « Commonwealth Ave.. Brighton 
Beacon 


PAINTING & DECORATING 

by 

Deagle & Aucoin 

8IG. 0753 — LAS. 4539 


Appliances 


MILLS RADIO & ELECTRIC 

// if** Electri cal w e'll fix it' 
osoi K \ OUR SflKW 
.1 A DIO • WASHER REFRIGERATOR 
— NOW — 

jiv Walnut St . Nrwt»t»tllle-HS*n 
Shrct Mu*lc - Classical *nd t*opuUr 
Record* 


Painting - Paperlianging 

Inside & Out Floors & Ceilings 

JOSEPH WRIGHT 

Al Bl'RN DALE 
Snap DECatur 1308 
Res BIGelow 5805 

76 CRESCENT STREET 


Printing 


Electrical Appliances 

Flodin Sewing Machine Co. 

Tel. BIG. 3204 

Register N.xr for Early Delivery 
257 Walnut Si. • Newtonville 


JAMES F. HL'GHES 

Commercial and Society rtniai 
Established IS Year* 

MS WALNUT STUNT 
.VI WT O N V ILLS 
BIGelow 1411 


Carpenters 


Piano Tuners 


HERBERT L. RAY 

CARPENTER 

Repair* promptly attended U 

70 Walker St.. Newtonville 
BIG 8343 


PIANOS WANTED 

COMPLETE PIANO SERVICE 
LOUIS V HAFFERMEHL 
Newton Centre 

l’el. Bigelow 1501 -Bigelow 1947 


Furniture \\ anted 


Electrician and Steamfitter 

Whim* (or lialil. heal and power tlrai 
lu* •'•Iriu* Installed and repaired \v 
pliant-* repair*. Prompt **r»lce. No Job 
loo small Kraiutiable price*. 

II M SWU M \ 

1*1 Salient Street. Newton SB 
telephone Hill. till 


WILL BUY 

\| trble Too Furniture, Palntluss. 
Pu-luret. t rame,. Odd and And*. 
Inure Conlruls oi llouic* 
lltiitdrd Reference 

Richard Gray 

OAKUAU RU KRWTON 
i all DECatur Antlluie 


PIANO TUNING 

Molh-rreeSn* aad n«oall4ia« 

J. W. TAPPER 

it tmuuKKs tlltir 
NCHION UlUtll-t.NU, 

LtSt.ll 1306 — BIGelow OUI 


Paint,--, s 


Hooters 


I’VIMIM: mi.) 

I’ VPI-.HII WCIMl 

l ••ilmjt* ami Fluor* FiitUllnl 
Fitinmht Given It l)e»iied 

Call HA He I'mk 


FLOORS SANDED 

Min i u ki d •mi Pin lsm n 

l.alett Equipment 

F. E. O'DEA - BIG. 9661 

too California Si.. >«»»lo»»*ill* 


W. I*. LEAVITT SONS CO. 

Any ty of HOOFING 
installed or repaired 
£9 PEARL ST- NEWTON 
DECatur 0778 


PAGE EIGHT 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC. 


.THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1946 


Wages Increased 
In New Sherman 
Paper Contract 

— o — 

An Increase In the basic wage 
for women, which was higher 
than that asked for by the union, 
was an outstanding development 
in recent contract negotiations 
between the Sherman Paper 
Products Corporation of Newton 
Upper Falls and Paper Workers 
Union 58-1. affiliated with United 
Playthings. Jewelry, and Novelty 
Workers International Union of 
the C.I.O. According to D. S. Rob- 
erts. Director of Operations for 
the Sherman Corporation, this 
substantial increase was made 
possible because production out- 
put in certain departments had 
increased encouragingly, as the 
result of improved methods and 
departmental re locations. 

An additional holiday with pay 


. was another benefit granted the 
factory workers, giving them 
I compensation for four major 
I holidays Memorial Day, Fourth 
' of July, Thanksgiving, and 
• Christmas. All workers now re- 
ceive vacations with pay, the 
length of the vacation depending 
upon the individuals length of 
service with the company. 

The contract was signed for the 
Sherman Corporation by D. S. 
Roberts. Director of Operations; 
H. T. Pilsbury, Personnel Direc- 
tor; and Benjamin Spinoza, Cor- 
poration Counsel. The committee 
, signing for the union included 
Thomas .1. Leone. International 
Representative: Vincent T. 
Gamble. President of Union 584; 
J. P. Reardon. Shop Steward: 
Vincent M. Witmeyer. Assistant 
Shop Steward: Alice S. Cimetta, 
Treasurer; Carolyn Bradley, Sec- 
retary: Patrick J. Dignan, and 
Agnes DcMichele. 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
SIASSAt III SI rTS 

Midilles.-x.sv PRO BAT I" COURT 

To nil persons Jnteresiod in the 
estate of 

Helen It. Mnnn 

also known ns Helen Rikrr Mnnn 
late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition lias been presented to 
said Court, praying that Howard B. 
Mann of Newton n said County, i» 
appointed administrator of said «•(■- 
tnte. without giving a surety on his 
bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or jour attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on the eighth day of February 
1P4^. the return day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Uegg.it. Esquire 
First Judge of said Court, this 
eighteenth day of January in the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LORING P. JORDAN, 

(N) J24-31 -f T Register. 


HURT 
n the 


COMMON WK VI III OF 
M \ ( II I >11 l> 

Middlesex, ss. PRORATE C 

To all persons Interested 
estate of 

K. llnmldr Ashenden 

also called Edward Handle Ashen- 
den late of Newton in said County, 
deceased 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that ^K-u- Harris 
of Ipswich in the County of Essex, 
be appointed administratrix with the 
will annexed of said estate not al- 
ready administered, without giving a 
surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should tile a written 
appearance in said Court at tain- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on the fifteenth day of I-eb- 
ruary 1946. the return day of this 
cltntlon. . 

Witness. John C. l.oggat. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this twen- 
ty-eighth day of January in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 

LORING P. JORDAN. 
(N> joi-r-i< R-Bl»l«r. 


FLAGS 

OF ALL KINDS 

All Sizes in Cotton, Silk 
and Rayon 

for Schools-Homea- 
Churches-Lodges 



STORM WINDOWS 
and DOORS 

Weather Stripping 


AWNINGS 

SCREENS 


SHADES 

VENETIAN BLINDS 


HOME SPECIALTIES CO. 

NEWTON CENTRE — TEL. BIGelow 3900 
WORCESTER TURNPIKE NEWTON CENTRE 


Senator David I. Walsh (centre) congratulated Mrs. George 
Friedman (left) of Brookline and Mrs. Henry L. Brandt (right) 
of Newton, and gave his endorsement of the work being accom- 
plished by the Jewish Tubereulolis Sanatorium of New F.nglnnd 
by saying “You are doing a wonderful piece of work and I wish 
von every success in vour undertakings." Mrs. Friedman is a 
member of the Board of Trustees and Mrs. Brandt is Treasurer. 
Maurice Caro of Brookline is President with Mrs. Victor M. 
Lewis, also of Brookline, the President of the Board of Governors. 


First Objective of Jewish T.B. 
Sanatorium Is Welfare of Patient 


r 



This philanthropic organiza- 
tion located in Rutland. Mass., is 
supported by the united efforts of 
ov’er five thousand men and wom- 
en divided into fourteen Auxil- 
iaries, living in Metropolitan 
Boston. These auxiliaries oper- 
ate independently of all other 
Jewish charities, their function 
being solely to maintain and im- 
prove the Sanatorium. The par- 
amount objectives of the Sanator- 
ium is the welfare of the patient, 
no one ever being permitted to 
feel that he or she is an object 
of charity. It has been serving 
the general public since May 
1936. Scores of sufferers have 
been restored to health and hap- 
piness since then, and returned to 
society and normal life after 
treatment in this health haven. 
Four ways to help this work are: 

1. Subscribe in the Golden Book; 

2. Ertroll as a Life Member; 3. 
Make contributions through dedi- 
cation of a room or bed; 4. En- 
roll as an active member of any 
one of the fourteen auxiliaries. 

Mrs. Harry L. Shufro of Al- 
derwood place. Newton Centre, 
is president of the Brookline 
Auxiliary No. 5. Other Newton 
people serving on the Bogftd of 
Trustees include: Mrs. Samuel 
Broomfield. Mrs. Max Ritvo of 
Waban Hill road. Mr. Harry L. 


Shufro of Alderwood road, Mr. 
Max D. Salomon of Avondale 
road, Mrs. Harry Veanor of Wes- 
sex road, and Mrs. Morris Cour- 
tiss of Overlook park, Newton 
Centre. 


With a record number of ac- 
cident cases reported by metro- 
politan hospitals during the past 
week as the result of falls on icy 
walks, streets and highways — 
and the number of skidding ac- 
cidents mounting, the Massa- 
chusetts Safety Council again 
urged residents of the Common- 
wealth to use caution. 


COM M O N W K A LT If O F 
.MASS AC II C SK I TS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

I To 

Catherine S. Foster 

r»f Newton in said County, and to 
l her heirs apparent or presumptive 
and i ' • the Massachusetts Department 
of Mental Health. 

A petition lias been presented to 
s tld Court alleging that said Cath- 
erine S Foster is an insane person 
and praying that Alfred W. Ingalls 
of Boston in the County of Suffolk, 
or some other suitable b e, ’3on. be ap- 
pointed her guardian. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on the fourteenth day of Feb- 
ruary 194'J, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John < Leg gat. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this seventh 
day of January in t ho year one thou- 
sand nine hundred ami fortv-slx. 

LURING P. JORDAN. 

(N) j-4-31 -f 7 Register. 


COM M li. MV K \LTII OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To al! persons interested in the 
estate of 

Julius llollunder 

late of Newton in said Count v de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
sa.d Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will ..f said deceased by J. Willard 
Hollandei and Ursula M Man hard 
"f Newton in said County, praying 
th.it they he appointed executors 
i hereof, without giving a surety on 
their bonds. 

if you desire to object thereto \-<>q 
or your attorney should fib- a written 
appearance in snld Court at Cam- 
•'ii'lge before ten o’clock In the fore- 
noon on the eighteenth day ..f F*-b- 
in iiv 19 |«. the rot urn day of this 
citation. 

Wltm- -. John « Leggy t. Esquire. 
Fir-’ Judge of said Court, this twen- 
d d of J mu trj In thi yeat 
one thousand nine hundred and fortv- 
six. 

LORING P. JORDAN, 
(N)J24-31-f7 Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
M \SSACIU SKTTs 

Middlesex, .sc. PROBATE COURT 
To all persons interested in the 
trust estate- under the will of 

Henry II. Carter 

late of Newton in said County, de- 
ce i: ed, for the benefit of Lydia A. 
Carter and others. 

The trustees of said estate have 
pr.-.-nted to said Court for allowance 
thdr thirteenth to fifteenth accounts 
inclusive and the remaining trustee 
hi- presented to said Court for al- 
lowance it-, first and second accounts. 
If you desire to object Ih.-iotn you 
' il l file a written 


Madam T ung 

( Continued from Page 1 ) 
wood, First Vice-President . 

2:25 “The Annual Meeting”— 
Mrs. Joseph E. Davison, Parlia- 
mentarian. 

2:35 Announcements— (War 
Relief) — Mrs. John A. Jennings, 
Chairman. 

(Topics) — Mrs. Nathaniel E. 
Smith, Subscription Chair- 
man, and Mrs. William J. Mc- 
Donald, Program and Advertis- 
ing Chairman. 

2:45 “Why Scholarships?” — 
Mrs. Burr J. Mcrriam, Vice-Chair- 
man Memorial scholarships. 

2:50 "Pending Legislation” — 
Mrs. Warren Whitman, District 
Chairman Legislation. 

3:05 Question Period. 

3:15 “Women’s Responsibility 
for Peace"— Mrs. Robert Max 


Ulln, Member Institute Commit- 
tee. 

3:35 “Educational Problems” 
—Mrs, Edward H. Averill, Vice- 
Chairman Education Committee. 

3:46 "Woman’s Responsibility 
in the New China” — Mme. Liu 
Ching Tung, former Professor 
Swart hmore College. 

4:15 Adjournment. 

o 

W. Newton Women's 
Educational Club 

The Hobby Class will mee t on 
Friday 15, at 2:00 P. M. at the 
home of Mrs. Chester Mac- 
Dowell, 278 Waltham Street. 
Sewing will be done on layettes 
for Russian Relief. 

The Garden Club will meet on 
Monday, February 18, at 1:00 
P. M. at the home of Mrs. Wil- 
liam DeMellc, 51 Davis avenue. 
Slides will be shown of Belling- 
rath Gardens and New England 
gardens. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
M ASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of 

Frank S. Ashenden 

late of Newton In said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by Aide Harris 
of Ipswich In the County of Essex, 
praying that she he appointed ad- 
ministratrix with the will annexed of 
said estate, without giving a surety 
on her bond. 

rf you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should tile a writ- 
ten appearnnee in snld Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock !n. the fore- 
noon on the fifteenth day of Febru- 
ary 1940, the return day of this cita- 
tion. 

Witness. John C. Eeggat, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court. this 
twenty-fourth day of January in the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

(N) J31 - f7. 14 Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSAC HI SKTTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE C< >URT 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of 

Kdxvln F. Quinlan 

late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to bp the last 
will of said deceased by Richard A. 
Crain of Melrose in said County, 
praying that he be appointed admin- 
istrator with the will annexed of said 
estate, without giving a surety on his 
bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In snld Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the eighteenth day of Feb- 
ruary 1946, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. Eeggat. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this twen- 
ty-fourth day of January In the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
six. 

LORING P. JORDAN, 

(N) J31-f 7-14 Register. 


Newton "Y" Swimmers 
Defeat Melrose and 
Boston "Y" Teams 

— O — 

In a three-way swimming meet 
last Saturday at the Boston Y. M. 
C. A. the Newton Y Midget swim- 
ming team prevailed over the 
Boston and Melrose Y swimmers. 
Final scores were Newton, 27; 
Melrose, 26; Boston, 16. 

The summary follows: 25 yard 
free style, 1st, Brown ( M ) ; 2nd, 
Amendola (N); 3rd, Jackson 
( B ) ; 4th, Warring (M). Time 13.3 
seconds. 25 yard breaststroke, 
1st, William Gray (N) ; 2nd, Qhar- 
les (M); 3rd, Vangcl 0B); 4th, 
Bates (B). Time 18.7 seconds. 25 
yard backstroke, 1st, Whelan 
(N); 2nd, Wheeler (M); 3rd, 
Fogelgren IN); 4th, Talios (B). 
Time 17.3 seconds. 75 yard medley 
relay won by Newton (Whelan, 
Gray, Amendola, Melrose second, 
Boston third. Time 52.4 seconds. 
100 yard free style relay won 
by Melrose (Westler, McLeod, 
Warring, Brown), Boston, sec- 
ond (Jackson, Vangel, Mullen, 
Talios), Newton third, (Larry 
Antonellis, James Fahey, Robert 
Maloney, and Stafford Huss). 
Time 1 minute', 3 seconds. 

The next swimming meet will 
be Friday night, February 8th at 
the Cambridge YMCA, when the 
Newton Y Junior and Midget 
teams compete with the Cam- 
bridge Y groups. 


Good times— when people who 
have money manage to get a lit- 
tle more. 


Cpl. Peabody 

Posthumously 

Decorated 

— o — 

Friends of Cpl. Arthur S. Pea- 
body, Jr. whoso parents live at 
56 Exeter street, West Newton, 
will be Interested to know that 
he was posthumously decorated 
on February 1st, 1916, for mer- 
itorious achievement in a aerial 
flight while participating in sus- 
tained operational . activities 
against the enemy in the Euro- 
pean area and for wounds re- 
ceived in action resulting in his 
death on February 7th, 1945. 

A special floral tribute, special 
music and a brief restatement of 
the words of President Truman, 
and of the Attorney-General in 
conferring the Purple Heart will 
be a part of the morning service 
February 10th, at St. Marks 
Methodist church, Park street, 
Brookline. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To 

Florence E. Ilrayton 
of Moretown, In the State of Ver- 
mont. 

A libel has been presented to aaid 
Court by your husband. Theodore A. 
Ilrayton praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between him- 
self and yon be decreed for the cause 
of cruel nnd abusive treatment and 
praying for custody of minor chil- 
dren. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge within twenty-one days from 
the eighteenth day of March 1946, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Eeggat, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this twen- 
ty-first day of January in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
six 

LORING P. JORDAN, 

(N) j24-31-f7 Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASS A I III SKTTS 

Middlesex, s PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of 

Georgia \. Atwood 
late of Newton In said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
Instrument purporting to be the last 
will of snld deceased by Irving M 
Atwood of Newton in said County, 
praying that lie be appointed execu- 
tor thereof, without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you doiro to object thereto you j 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o’clock In the fore- 
noon .-it the twelfth day of Felmiaij 
1946. the return day of tills citation 
Witness, John >' Eeggat, Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this- twon- ' 
t> -first da > of January in the year I 
ate thousand nine hundred and fortj - 


six. 

<N) J2l-31-f7 


LORING P. 


JORDAN. 

Register. 


bridge 


icfoi 


aid 


ten 


clock In 


foi 


A* 


jlILL 


PLAN YOUR 1946 GARDEN NOW 

PLAN 

utiom: you 

I'lAM 

PLAN YOUR GARDEN ON PAPER FIRST. Consult 
your seedsman for suggestions as to better planting, 
fertilizing and general care Also ask him about new 
or more choice varieties of seeds Eliminate those 
grown not well liked by the family but fill in that 
space with another choice. Increase your variety of 
foods to be selected from. 

OUR SEEDSMAN, Mr Norman Howden, has been in 
this business for 48 years. His record is a proven 
one You can depend on his advice 


THE CLAPPER C0 

FORMERLY NEW ENGLAND TORO CO. 

NEWTON SEED-GARDEN STORE 

1121 Waikingtcn St., W*it NtwUn 16 - BIG. 1900 


Fir * Judge 

I eighteenth d •" 

one thnuv.tnd : 


hundred and f- rty- 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
M ASSAt II I SKTTs 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of 

Lillian P. Quinlan 

late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition bus been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be tho last 
will ..f said deceased by Richard A. 
Crain of Melrose In said County, 
praying that he be appointed admin- 
. istrator with the will annexed of 
said estate, without giving a surety 
on Ills bond. 

If you tie-ire to object thereto J'lU 
or your attorney should file a written 
Jiptiea ranee in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in III- fore- 
noon on the eighteenth day < f Feb- 
ruary 1916. the return day of this 

WIincsH. John f. Eeggat, Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, tin- iwrn- 
tv- fourth day of Januarj in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 


six. 


LORING P. JORDAN. 
f.N) J2l-"l-f7 Register. <N) J31-f7-14 


LORING P. JORDAN’. 


HERTEL ELECTRIC CO. 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

Franchise Dealer 

WESTINGHOUSE - BLACKSTONE 


CROSLEY -- 
1345 WASHINGTON STREET 


ROYAL 

WEST NFWTCn 


•J 


LET YOUR LAWYER MAKE 
YOUR INCOME TAX RETURNS 

Massachusetts and Federal tax returns will 
soon be due Compile what figures you think 
necessary and see your lawyer for advice as to what 
other data should be furnished in order accurately 
to prepare your returns and obtain the result most 
favorable to you. Your lawyer will advise you 
what items are taxable and tax exempt and what 
deductions my be claimed. Do not belong to the 
large group of taxpayers who overpay through 
ignorance. 

See your lawyer for advice also on wills, con- 
tracts, accidents, and other problems and save 
money by following his advice to keep you out of 
litigation 

MIDDLESEX BAR ASSOCIATION 




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BOY SCOUT WEEK 

FEBRUARY 8-14, 1946 

CELEBRATING THE 36" ANNIVERSARY OF THE 

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA 

NEARLY 2,000,000 ACTIVE MEMBERS 


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Norumbega Council, BOY SCOUTS OF 
AMERICA, serving Newton and Wellesley, will 
commemorate Boy Scout Week with a series of 
Cub Scoj.it, Scout, and Senior Scout activities. 
The Council’s Air Squadron will conduct the pro- 
gram at the weekly meeting of the Newton 
Rotary Club at Brae Burn Country Club. 

Friday, February 8th, is the 36th Anniversary 
of the Founding of the Scout Movement in 
America. A Court of Honor will be conducted 
on the evening of the Anniversary date at the 
Levi Warren Junior High School in West New- 
ton. On that occasion Scouts of the Council 
will receive awards ranging from Second Class 
to Eagle Rank— the highest. 

February 10 Is Boy Scout Sunday. A Mass 


and Communion Breakfast will take place at 
Our Lady's Church for Cub Scouts, Scouts and 
Senior Scouts of Catholic Faith, at 7:30 A. M. — 
the Rev. Martin Dolphin of Sacred Heart Parish 
is the Chaplain for Scouts of Catholic Faith. 

A Union Service for Cub Scouts, Scouts and 
Senior Scouts of Protestant Faith will take place 
at the Second Congregational Church in West 
Newton at 4 P. M. on Scout Sunday. Dr. Russell 
M. Boynton is Chaplain for Scouts of Protestant 
Faith. The Rev. Frederick M. Morris of Trinity 
Church, Newton Centre, will give the sermon. 

On Friday, February 15, a service for Cub 
Scouts, Scouts and Senior Scouts of Jewish Faith 
will be held at Temple Emanuel, Ward Street, 
Newton Centre at 8 P. M. Rabbi Samuel Sher- 
man is Chaplain for Scouts of Jewish Faith. 


This Space Is Donated in the Interest of Boy Scouts by 


HUBBARD’S 

Newton's Prescripton Pharmacy 

RUANE 

Greater Boston’s Most Reasonable Florist 

NEWTON’S 

The Fashion Centre of Newton 


KEN KAYE CRAFTS CO. 

Crafts Supplies 

MOORE & MOORE, Inc. 

Hardware 

The Paint & Wall Paper Shop 

Painters’ Supplies 


4 






A- .-t 


"Build Hospital Adequate to 
Existing Needs," Farley Asserts 
At Hospital's Annual Meeting 

Neil Leonard Advocates Aggressive 

Policy in Prosecution of Fund Project 

Maintaining that all hospitals in Creator Boston should bo 
considered as an integrated whole, John Wells Farley, president 
of the Boston Children’s Hospital, asserted last night at the an- 
nual meeting and dinner of Newton-Wellesley Hospital that larger 
hospitals in Boston could not possibly carry the burden unless 
outlying hospitals such as Newton-Wellesley were able to bear 
their proportionate share. 


The Newton Graphic 

NEWTON'S LEADING NEWSPAPER - ESTABLISHED 1872 


VOL. LX XIII. No. 20. 


NEWTON. MASS., Till RSDAV. FEBRUARY II. 1040 


Single Copies 3c; $2. .VI per Year 


Pearl Harbor, T. H.- TWO ENLISTED WAVES, one from San 
Francisco, and one from Newton, are shown above receiv- 
ing letters of commendation from Vice Admiral S. A. Jaf- 
findbr, USN, Commandant Fourteenth Naval District. Letf to 
right are: Chief Yeoman Mary Iacono, of 31 Jefferson street, 
Newton; Chief Yeoman Geraldine C. Magee, of 44 Cortland 
street, San Francisco; and Vive Admiral Taffinder. (Offi- 
cial U. S. Navy Photograph.) 

Newton WAVE Commended by 
Commandant of 14th Naval District 


PEARL HARBOR, T. H. — 
Mary Iacono, WAVE yeoman, of 
31 Jefferson street, Newton, has 
received a letter of commenda- 
tion from Vice Admiral S. A. 
Taffinder, USN, Commandant 
Fourteenth Naval District. 

Miss Iacono was one of the 
first two enlisted WAVES to ar- 
rive at Pearl Harbor more than 
a year ago when WAVES were 
first assigned to overseas duty. 

She helped in advance prepara- 
tions to receive more than 4000 
WAVES who eventually saw 
duty in the Hawaiian Islands. 

Chief Yeoman Iacono is the 
sister of Mrs. Louis Picariello 
and Mrs. Stephen Lopez, both of 
whom live at the Newton ad- 
dress. 


Alan Booth at 
Highland Glee Club 
Spring Concert 

— o — 

The Highland Glee Club of 
Newton, Inc. is well on its way 
in preparation of the Spring Con- 
cert to be held in the High School 
auditorium on March 19. 

They are highly elated over the 
generous response from the mus- 
ic lovers of the city, as indicated 
by the fact that their present 
subscription list will, they hope, 
exceed any previous year. 

The December concert was at- 
tended by a near capacity aud- 
(Continued, on Page 3) 

Boy Scout Sunday Observed 
In Newton Churches February 10 

Norumbega Council, Boy Scouts of America, celebrated Boy 
Scout Sunday on February 10 throughout the day. Cub Scouts, 
Scouts and Senior Scouts gathered for Scouting services in 
churches throughout Newton and Wellesley. 

A Mass and Communion Break-fc- 

fast took place at Our Lady’s 
ing, when Cub Scouts, and Sen- 
Church in Newton in the morn- 
ior Scouts of Catholic Faith 
gathered from throughout the 
Council. At the Communion 
Breakfast, Scoutmaster Edward 
C. Michaud presided. The Rev- 
erend Martin J. Dolphin, Area 
Chaplain for Scouts of Catholic 
Faith for Norumbega Council, 
pronounced the Invocation, and 
the Reverend Daniel J. Taglino 
made the address of welcome for 
the Reverend Michael E. Doher- 
ty, Pastor. Council President, 

James C. Walton, Scout Com- 
missioner, F. B. Kennedy, and 
Scout Executive, Robert E. Pet- 
tit, extended Council greetings. 

Mr. John M. Bierer, Chairman of 
Region 1, greeted the assembly 
on behalf of the Region, which 
includes all of New England. Lt. 

(Continued on Pugc J) 


Mr. Farley, who also is pros!- 
! dent of the Greater Boston Com- 
i munity Fund, was intorduced to 
, trustees, members of the hospital 
: family and guests numbering 
about 100 in all, by Clifford H. 
Walker, who was re-elected pres- 
ident of the board of trustees. 
Other speakers weer Noil Leon- 
ard, general chairman of New- 
ton-Welleslcy Hospital’s $2,250.- 
000 building fund project, who 
gave an account of the progress 
made to date, and Miss Esther M. 
Story, assistant to Gerhard Hart- 
man, director of the hospital, 
whose illness prevented him from 
attending. 

Briefly outlining the situation 
confronting hospitals in metropol- 
itan Boston, Mr. Farley remarked 
that the facilities of all of them 
are greatly overtaxed and de- 
clared that the solution could not 
be found in the establishment of 
small suburban hospitals with a 
modicum of essential equipment 
and medical talent. 

“The only other alternative,” 
he continued, ‘ is the one you have 
developed here for Newton and 
Wellesley. All of you may not be 
aware of it, but your hospital and 
its medical staff and trustees 
rank highe*- in many well-inform- 
ed eyes outside Newton and Wel- 
lesley than in some within.” 


Mr. Farley said that if anyone 
in Newton or Wellesley denies 
support to the hospital because of 








NEIL LEONARD, general 
chairman Hospital Building 
Fund # Project. 

allegience to institutions in Bos- 
ton or elsewhere, the excuse 
should not be regarded as valid. 
"The greatest service you can do 
your community is to build a hos- 

(Continued on Page 3) 


Elks Install Fire Alarm System 
At Working Boys' Home 


PICTURES FRAMED 
MIRRORS RESILVERED 
BROKEN GLASS REPLACED 

H1EWT0N GLASS CO. 

302 Centre Street, Newton 
BIQelow 1268 


EXPERT 

CLOCK REPAIRING 

Eleclrir, spring or weight. 
Any type, foreign or domea- 
tie. .Alarm CIni-ka, (any «?on- 
dition). Immediate service. 

SINGLETON 

501 WATERTOWN STREET 
NEWTONV1LLE 

BIGelow 4647 


Herter Appoints 
Waban Boy to 
West Point 

— o — 

Congressman Christian A. Her- 
ter today announced his appoint- 
ments for the Military Academy 
in 1946. As principals for the 
two vacancies on his list, Mr. 
Herter has nominated Thomas 
Roger Keane, Jr., of Longwood 
Towers, Brookline, and Charles 
C. Stewart of 42 Annawan road, 
Waban. Both boys stood at the 
top of the list of some forty can- 
didates who took the competitive 
examinations for West Point 
last July. 

Joseph A. Murphy, S 1-c, US- 
NR, of 157 Pearl street, Brook- 
line, has been selected as first 
alternate. Second and third al- 
ternates named by Mr. Herter 
are Edward M. Kaitz of 55 A1 
gonquin road, Newton, and Wat 
cr Brent, 95 Bourne street, Jam 
aica Plain. 


(you/ i 
J Like 

Sutton's 


BRIGHTON 

mm- X- 

9/0-n BOSTON 


1 wALLSToN 


1 



DINNERS 

LUNCHEONS 

JUS W ISES 
JjquoRS 
ALGonquin 
9783 


£ 


"WATERTOWN 


SEA FOOD 
LOBSTER 
STEAKS 
CHOPS 
CHIC KEN 


— O — 

A complete modern fire alarm 
system installed at the Working 
Boys’ Home, Newton Highlands, 
a gift from the Newton Lodge 
of Elks, was put into operation 
last Saturday by Chief John L. 
Keating of the Newton Fire De- 
partment at a formal ceremony 
held at the Home. 

A delegation from Newton 
Lodge including Chief of Police 
Nicholas Veduccio, present at 
the ceremony, was conducted on 
an inspection tour of the newly 
installed system by Brother 
Superior Aubert, CFX, of the 
Working Boys’ Home. The sys- 
tem consists of four stations, one 
on each floor of the four story 
brick building, and is directly 
connected with the Newton Fire 
Alarm headquarters. It is sim- 
ilar to the fire alarms systems 
ir. most of the public school 
buildings in Newton. 

There are at present 132 boys 1 
living at the Home. Chief Keat- 
and Qhief Veduccio addressed 
the boys in the Assembly Hall 
where they had been attending a 
motion picture show. 

lean Duff. Newtonville. 
Stewardess on Airliner 

— O — 

Jean M. Duff of 119 Lowell 
avenue, Newtonville, has joined 
Northeast Airlines as a steward- 
ess, and tias been assigned to the 
Boston-New York flights. 

Miss Duff served for two years 
and three months as a Pharma- 
cist’s Mate, second class, in the 
Women’s Reserve Hospital Corps 
of the Navy. 

Northeast Airlines stewardess- 
es must meet the following es- 
sential requirements: Age, 21-26 
inclusive; weight, 105-125 pounds; 
ability to pass a complete flight 
physical examination; personal- 
ity and charm; and at least two 
years’ attendance at an accred- 
ited college together with nurses’ 
training. A stewardess must be 
neither married nor engaged. 


Your Blood Can 
Save a Life! 


There is still time to register 
for Blood Donor days at New- 
ton Red Cross. 

“Your blood can save a life 
in peace time as well as in 
war,” says Mrs. C. Terry Col- 
lens, Chairman Blood Donors 
for Newton. ‘Tlasma and all 
the ‘fractions’ of plasma de- 
veloped during the war will lie 
available to civilians in event 
of disaster." 

Call Lasell 6000 for an ap- 
pointment to give your blood 
either February 19 from 10:43- 
4:45 or February 2ft from 
12:43-6:45, at the Red Cross 
Chapter House, 21 Foster 
street, Newtonville. 


State Federation Forum at 
Auburndale Woman's Club 


The Auburndale Woman's 
Club, was the first Newton Wo- 
man’s Club to be hostess to the 
State Federation Club Institute 
F/Drum, and it was not only a 
beautiful spring day or. the cal- 
ender, but a Red-letter day on the 
Club calender for Newton. A 
warm and friendly atmosphere, 
a large attendance, the many 
spirited and enlightening sub 
jeets discussed by the State For 
um Speakers, all contributed to 
an instructive and successful 
day. 

Mme. Liu Ching Tung has an 
unassuming, yet charming stage 
presence and poise, and won her 
audience from the start. Com- 
paring the women of yesterday 
with the women of China today. 
Mme. Liu said that it was like 
putting a new stone into an old 
setting. 

‘‘Woman's Responsibility in 
the New China,” was the subject 
of the principal speaker, Mme. 
Liu Ching Tung, former Profes- 
sor at Swarthmore College, 
when the Mass. State Federation 
of Womens’ Clubs, Mrs. Edwin 
Troland, President, held a Club 
Institute Forum, Tuesday. Feb. 
12. as guest of the Auburndale 
Woman’s Club, Mrs. Eric J. Ker- 
math. President. 

Mrs. Eric Kermath. President 
of the Auburndale Club, wel- 
comed the guests and turned the 
meeting over to Mrs. Wilson H. 
Roads, chairman of the Forum, 
who introduced Mrs. Arthur 
Cornell, 12th District Director, 
who brought greetings from the 
Federation, in the absen.ee of 
Mrs. Greenwood. 1st Vice-Presi- 
dent. Mrs. Cornell also read an 
(Continued on Page 8) 


Red Cross Fund 
Quotas Announced 


Ensign Eastman 
Returns from Pacific 

— o — 

Ensign Frederic B. Eastman, 
Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederic 
B. Eastman of Newtonville, has 
returned fjoni duty with the 
Seventh Fleet in the Japan-China- 
Formosa theater, and has been 
placed on inactive duty in the 
U. S. Naval Reserve. He will re- 
sume his employment in chemi- 
cal engineering, and he and Mrs. 
Eastman will reside at 120 
Church street, Newton. 

While a student of chemical 
engineering at Northeastern Uni- 
(Continued on Pugc 8) 


M 


L L 


N O 


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Open 9-5, Daily; Sal., 9-12 


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A 


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EDUCATIONAL TOYS • BABY STROLLERS 

ASK about BABYLAND’S “Sister and Brother Club.” 
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to one of our customer's children. 


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INTERIOR and EXTERIOR j 

PAINTING 

and 

PAPERHANGING 
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fl 85 Mapie St., Needham 
j. Needham 1593 ll 


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BURN WOOD! 

Slab wood cut in fur- 
nace lengths delivered 
in your cellar. 

Emergency Orders Filled 

1/2 Cord $11.00 

Maine Wood Co., Inc. 

TKO. 8226 


Dr. Hitchen Returns 
From Europe, Speaks 
InW. Newton Feb. 18 

— o — 

First-hand acounts of condi- 
tions in England and the posi- 
tion of religious liberals over- 
seas will be given in an address 
at 8 p.m. on February 18 by 
Dr Herbert Hitchen. Director of 
the Department of Foreign 
Churches of the American Uni- 
tarian Association, at a public 
meeting in the First Unitarian 
Church, West Newton. The talk 
is being sponsored by the Uni- 
tarian Laymen’s League, Ray 
Stevens, president, announced 
today. Chairman will be ex-Scn- 
ator Sinclair Weeks. 

Dr. Hitchen was given a leave 
of absense from the First Uni- 
tarian Society of Newton in Jan- 
uary in order to fly to England 
for conferences with the general 
assembly of Unitarian and Free 
Christian Churches and to visit 
the English churches. 

o 

Will Observe Boy Scout 
Week at Temple 
Emmanuel. Sunday 

— O — 

At the Sabbath Eve Services 
in Temple Emmanuel on Friday 
evening, February 15, at 8:15 
there will be a special observ- 
ance of "Boy Scout Week" with 
the posting of the colors and 
Scout Oath by the Temple Em- 
manuel Troop. Rabbi Sherman 
will preach at the service, his 
subject, "Jews Fight. Too"' Af- 
ter the services there will be 
Oneg Shabbat and reception in 
Benjamin Vestry . Mr. Edward 
Cohen. Scout Commissioner, and 
officials of Norumbega Council. 
Boy Scouts will bo guests Mr. 
and Mrs. Leo Freedman will be 
hosts. 




MRS. ERIC. j. KERMATH 

Pres. Auburndale Wtynan's Club 

Commander Buse. 
Discharged, Resumes 
Law Practice 

Commander Harold B Buse of 
4 Crehore drive, Newton Lower 
Falls, was recently released from 
active duty in the Civil Engin- 
eer Corps. United State Naval 
Reserve, after more than five 
years' service. Called to duty in 
October. 1940. he served as Of 
ficer-in-charge of Construction. 
Civil Works. USN at Quincy and 
supervised construction of addi- 
tions to the Bethlehem Steel 
Company's Fore River Yard, the 
Bethlehem - Hingham Shipyard. 
Bethlehem East Boston Yard. 
Raytheon Mfg. Co.. Waltham, 
and many other projects. Dur- 
ing 1943 he was transferred to 
the West Coast and was in 
charge of all floating drvdock 
construction from Seattle to San 
Diego, with headquarters in San 
Francisco. In 1944 he served as 
Assistant Director. Construction 
Division. Bureau of Yards and 
Docks at Washington. D. C.. and 
later as Offlcer-in-charge of Con- 
(Continued on Page 6) 

o 

Home Nursing Course 
Starts February 18 

— O — 

A new class to start Monday, 
February 18 in Six Lessons on 
the Care of the Sick" is announc- 
ed by the Red Cross Home Nurs- 
ing Committee. The class will 
be conducted at the Chapter 
House, 21 F New- 

tonville. each Monday and Wed- 
nesday from 7:30 to 9:30. Regis- 
tration may be made by calling 
Mrs. Edward Blake. BIG. 4916. 

Recent graduates of the new 
shortened Horn Nursing Course 
include: Mrs. John Quirk. Miss 
Sadie Mclsaac. Miss Alary C 
Malian, Mrs. S. L. Billings. Mrs. 
Frank Reilly. Miss Jean Went- 
sell. Miss Dorothy Day. Mrs. Jos- 
eph Beaver, Mrs. Harvie Arnold, 
Mrs. Wilson Kuntz. Mrs. George 
Crosbie. Mrs. Isabel Monzert, 
Mrs. Walter Carlcv and Mrs. 
Stephen Cupoli. 


Communion Buffet 
Breakfast at Our 
Lady's Church 

— o — 

The Communion Buffet Break- 
fast at the Church of Our Lady's 
Parish at Newton, Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 10. 1946 was an over- 
whelming success. After the 
Communion Breakfast in the 
auditorium of Our Lady’s High 
School, the members of Our 
Lady's Holy Name Society lis- 
tened to a stirring address by 
the Rev. Edward L. Murphy, S. 
J. of Weston College. 

Father Murphy entitled his 
talk "The Pope's Challenge to 
Catholic Men." In presenting the 
(Continued on Page 3) 

New Grade School 
In West Newton 
Ready Sept. *47 

Mayor Paul M. Goddard has 
engaged Howard L. Rich of 269 
Franklin street. Newton as arch- 
itect for the proposed new grade 
school building to be erected at 
Berkeley and Temple street, 
West Newton. 

Contour plans of the site are 
now being prepared by the New- 
ton Engineering Department for 
use by the architect in drawing 
his plans. 

The building which is to be 
erected at an estimated cost 
of $278,000 will be of brick con- 
struction and will contain 8 .lass 
rooms, a kindergarten, a combin- 
ation auditorium-gymnasium and 
sendee rooms. It is to take the 
place of the present Pierce 
School on Chestnut street. which 
is to be abandoned. Pupils now 
attending the Pierc- School who 
reside nearer to the Davis School 
will be transferred to the lat- 
ter school when the new building 
is ready for occupation. 

It is estimated that the plans 
and specifications will be ready 
in three to four months for the 
advertising of bids and con- 
struction would start next sum- 
mer. the building to be comDlet- 
ed and ready for occupancy by 
September 1947. 


In announcing Village quotas 
for the coming $90,000 Red Cross 
Fund Campaign in Newton. John 
S. Whittemore. chairman, 1946 
Committee, commented on the 
responsibilities of that organiza- 
tion for the coming year. Serv- 
ices to occupation forces, serv- 
ices to the thousands of hospital- 
ized soldiers and .sailors, and 
services to veterans — "the three 
continuing battle fronts of the 
American Red Cross — were not 
diminished but highlighted and 
intensified by VE Day and YJ 
Day, symbols of war's end for 
the nation. 

In the years 1941 to 1945 Am- 
erican Red Cross services to the 
armed forces became the most 
extensive operation of its kind 
in the history of the organiza- 
1 * 

Standish Appointed 
Trustee of 
Chaffin Fund 

— o — 

Mayor Paul M. Goddard has 
appointed Alexander Standish of 
183 Lake Avenue. Newton High- 
lands as a member of the Board 
of Trustees of the Chaffin Fund 
to take the place of U. S. Senator 
Leverett Saltonstall who has re- 
signed as a member of that 
board. The Chaffin fund was es- 
tablished under the will of the 
donor to assist graduates of the 
Newton High School to obtain 
higher education. 

The mayor has also appointed 
George M. Lovejoy of 10 Esta- 
brook Road. West Newton, a 
member of the Public Welfare 
Board to succeed Alderman Wil- 
liam R. Mattson who resigned 
from this board when elected a 
member of the Board of Aider- 
men. 

The appointments will be sub- 
mitted to the Board of Aldermen 
at their next meeting on Feb- 
ruary IS. for confirmation. 


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Helen Cross Bakery 

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DENTAL SURGEON 

Registered in Mnttarhutrlls, 
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WESTON 

Nekton H.ghlana* 





PAGE TWO 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


THURSDAY, FERRUARY 14. 1946 


The Newton Graphic 

(Consolidated With Which la The Town Crier) 
“Newton’s landing and Oldest Newspaper” 
established 1872 
Pubiinhed Weekly on Thursdays 

Office 11 Centre Avenue Newton — P. 0. Building 
Mail Address: Box 205. Newton 58. Massachusetts 
Telephone LASell 4.754 

John W. Fielding, Manager 
PHILIP O AF1LIN 

Editor and Advertising Manager 

Entered ns second-class mail matter at the post office at 
Boston. Mass., under the Act of March 8. 1879 


The Words Of Lincoln 

Tuesday of this week we observed the birthday of the im- 
mortal Lincoln. It was he who gave us t he phrase — “government ' 
of the people, by the people and for the people.” It is fitting, oh, , 
so fitting, at this time, when many are trying to tinker with our ■ 
form of government, that we re-dedicate ourselves to the simple 
force ami clarity of his words. 

And in the larger field of world government and world peace, , 
while we and the other United Nations feel our way cautiously 
through the old mazes of “spheres of influence, " “power polities” J 
and diplomatic intrigues, let us hold before the world its bright- [ 
est hope expressed so simply by Abraham Lincoln — “government 
of the people, hv the people and for the people.” Therein lies 
universal peace. 

"Brotherhood - A Challenge" 

This is Brotherhood Week — in the new Atomic Age. Here 
is a challenge worthy of Americans. Can we work together with 
our neighbors at home and abroad, and enjoy an era of peace 
and prosperity such ns the world has never known? or shall we 
muff the peace and plunge the world into complete destruction? 
In a few months or years we may no longer have the choice. Just 
now it's still up to us. 

We know we must get along with other nations, in spite -of the 
fact that their languages, their customs, and even their political 
systems are different from our own. This may not he as difficult I 
a? it sounds. For friendship begins at home, and America is a i 
great laboratory. We have already learned to understand and 
respect many different people — the neighbors down the block 
who attend a different church, the folks on the next street who i 
use strange seasonings in their food, the little colored hoy in the j 
same grade with Junior. 

War brought t lie people of this country closer together than 
ever before. We worked together. Protestant, Catholic and Jew; 
white, black and yellow; native and foreign-born. Together we 
defeated the enemy in spite of every effort to divide us. As 
President Truman, in his proclamation, stated: “The armies of 
the United Nations won a conclusive victory over the forces of j 
ytranny which exploited racial and religious hatred to divide ; 
the world and destroy freedom.” 

Brotherhood Week reminds us that we must maintain this 
unity if we are to win the peace. The conquest of the atom heralds 
unheard-of wonders— -or swift and total destruction. Tomorrow 
we will live in “one world — or none/’ Either we work together J 
as equal citizens of that world, or there will be nothing left to j 
work in. . # . 

What world-citizenship can mean is demonstrated in the 
realm of medicine where the practical benefits of brotherhood | 
arc felt by every one of us. An Englishman developed the vac- j 
eination for smallpox; a French chemist produced the euro for 
rabies: the discoveries of a Japanese and a German guard our 
children from liplitlieria; pellagra is being cured today because 
of the researches of an Austrian. These men— and thousands like 
them of every race and creed — never thought in terms of national 
boundaries, religious groupings or racial differences. They were 
servants of all mankind. 

Such is the harvest of brotherhood — the only harvest that 
can bring us lasting peace. 


PARAMOUNT 

j NEWTON CORNER 

j LASell 4180 

WEST NEWTON 

WEST NEWTON 8QCARB 

LASell 3540 

Sumlay-Monclsiy -Tuesday- Wednesday 

4 Days — February 17-18-19-20 j 

Robert Montgomery - John W* me 

“They Were 

Expendable” 

Penny Slncleton- Arthur Lake 

"LIFE WITH BLONDIE" 

SUN. THRU TUES. FEB. 17-19 
Charles Boyer- Lauren Bacall 

“Confidential Agent” 

— Also — 

Jack Haley-Helen Walker 

"PEOPLE ARE FUNNY" 

Tliursday-Frlday-Saturday 

3 Days — Febru*ry 21-23-23 

Joan Leslie • Robert Hutton 

‘Too Young lo Know’ 

Morgan Conti a v . Ann* Jeffrey* 

"DICK TRACY” 

WED. THRU SAT. FEB. 20-23 

Betty Hutton 

Barry Fitzgerald 

“Stork Club” 

— Also — 

"UNCLE HARRY" 

Serial — naturduv Matinee "Phantom 
Rider" 

Monday-Thursday night* — Our mala 
Picture .‘-.•rts promptly at 8:00 

Matinee* 1 30 

Continuous Sundays and Holiday; 



Politics Willi 
Color 

(The opinions expressed in this 
column are the writer's own. ana 
do not necessarily reflect the views 
or policy of this newspaper. — Edi- 
tor'* Note). 

Gov. Tobin Wins 

I spent last Monday afternoon 
watching the Legislature uphold 
a Governor Tobin’s veto of the 
airport-bus bill, which would have 
permitted people to go to and 
from the Logan International 
Airport on the Boston Elevated 
for 25c as against the 75c fare 
now forced on the travelling pub- 
lic. 

Well, it was most interesting, 
though not inspiring, either from 
the standpoint of intellectual ad- 
vancement or an increased es- 
teem for the so-called Great and 
General Court. The Governor 
and his leaders in the Legislature 
were understood to have turned 
the heat on many of the recal- 
citrant Democrats who had been 
so bold as to vote according to 
their honest convictions when 
this bill was originally passed 
by a very substantial margin last 
month. That, plus the violent 
support of the leading Demo- 
eraite organ in Boston, the Post, 
served to pull back into line 
many Democrats. As a matter 
of fact, there were only eight 
Democrats who defied His Ex- 
cellency and voted to over ride 
the veto. Sixteen more votes 
were needed to over-ride. Among 
the non-voting Representatives 
were twelve Repblicans and five 
Democrats. Your columnist re- 
frains from commenting about 
these men until such time as he 
learns how many of them were 
sick or out of town. Senator In- 
nes advised me at the time that 
Rep. Chase, Republican, of Bos- 
ton was attending the customary 
Monday session of the Boston 
City Council. 

As I listened to the various ar- 
guments pro and con. I could 
not help wondering if some of 
the speakers really believed what 
they said. For example, one im- 
passioned orator announced that 
the rank and file of Metropoli- 
tan Boston industrial workers 
were of far more importance to 
him than ANY group of the gen- 
eral public from New York, the 
West and other parts of the 
country. Indeed, there was a 
frequent raising of class distinc- 
tions, which, it seems to me, 
have no place in debates of this 
nature. There was also consid- 
erable bitter criticism of the El- 
evated. It appears to be a com- 
mon indoor sport to lambaste the 
El every so often, regardless of 
the merits of the case. Some of 
the Democrats were convinced 
that the El was trying to hold up 
the public by charging MORE 
than a ten cent fare. These same 
men, however, had no objection to 
allowing the Sutcliffe-Tobin 
crowd the privilege of exacting 
a 75c fare. 

Now. what will be the outcome 
of all this furor? Several promi- 
nent Republicans have advised 
me that, in their opinion, the up- 
holding of the Governor’s veto 
may well prove to be a tremen- 
dous help to Lt. Governor Brad- 
ford when he campaigns for the 
Governorship this fall. It does 
seem as though His Excellency 
had gone out on the end of a limb 
in pressing this issue so stub- 
bornly. From the writer's stand- 
point. it was bad economics, bad 
politics and worse than bad pub- 
lic service to insist on the defeat 
of this airport-bus bill. Just 
watch for future developments 
surrounding this entire issue. 
You will hear a great deal more 
about this vitally-important mat- 
ter before many weeks have gone 

Weekly Quiz 

The answer to last week’s quiz 
was Abraham Lincoln. Because 
I felt certain that the inclusion of 
two items would make the quos- 
t ion to ■ imple, r omitted refer- 
once to the loss of Lincoln's 
sweetheart, Ann Rutledge, as 
well as ni.s defeat for a minor 
office which would have placed 
my quiz well back in history. 
Incidentally, how many of my 
readers heard that splendid rad- 
io production earlier this week, 
depicting the early cereer of Lin- 
coln and placing special empha- 
- s ‘- s on h.s love for Ann Rutledge? 

This week's question is: What 
public servant in Newton has 
held more different offices than 
a iy ot hei man still living? 
Harold E. Slassen 

Former Governor Harold E. 
Stassen of Minnesota made an 
excellent impression at the Mid- 
dlesex Club dinner Tuesday even- 
ing. I could not help thinking 
what an outstanding candidate 
ho would make in 1948. Hta 
voice is better than either the 
late Wendell L. Willkie, whom he? 
resembles in many ways, or the 
present New York Governor, 


RE-HOOF NOW 
and SAVE! 

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sri- Barrett Mineral Surfaced 
Asphalt Shingles They are 
handsome, sturdy, tough, long- 
la: / It . Hi L ost you nothing 

to let u show you Famples 
ami t may buvq you much! 

PECK LUMBER CO. 

247 Newtonville Ave. 



^asaimt 

L ->!ar : > It iTilfiii ; ft 


To a Canada Goose 

Wild heart . . . Winging your way through boundless 
skies, 

Whose clamor echoes through the breaking morn; 
How could you know of staring, sightless eyes, 
Upturned, to where you silhouette the dawn? 

So short a time ago against the paling stars, 

I knew the dew-drenched touch of passing cloud; 
And watched the sun break through, with golden bars, 
To rend the ground-mists, like a parting shroud. 

I too felt pity for all earth-bound things, 

Who could not soar into the vast unknown; 

To dart and turn, to twist on silvered wings, 

Or course the far horizons, all alone. 

All things must end . . . from flashes far below, 

A hail of death permeates the air around; 

A silver bird turns in a fiery glow, 

And plummets to the ever-waiting ground. 

Go on your way ... to find safe harbor and to mate, 
A blinded birdman bids you fond adieu; 

And may you never know the cost of bitter hate, 

But span eternal zones, just as God meant you to. 

Bill Maloney 


Announce Hospital Dr. Anderson Outlines 
Aid Association School Building 
Committee Chairmen Objectives to Parents 


— o — 

At the February meeting of 
the directors of the Newton- 
Wellesley Hospital Aid Associ- 
ation Tuesday. In the lounge of 
the Nurses’ Home, committee 
chairmen were announced for 
the new year by the president, 
Mrs. Theron B. Walker. Mrs. 
Hubert L. Carver, the new 3rd | 
vice-president, will chairman the 
patient committee, a position 
ably filled for the past three 
years by Mrs. Henry F. Keever. 
Mrs. Cecil W. Clark, new 5th 
vice-president, will represent the 
Benefit Shop, of which Mrs. D. 
Brewer Eddy and Mrs. Ralph 
W. Conan t are co-chairmen. Mrs. 
Benjamin D. Miller, the new 6th 
vice-president, will chairman the 
Coffee Shop committee, chair- 
manned since the opening of the 
Shop by Mrs. Walter L. McGill. 
Miss Madeline Cobb will act as 
chairman of the nominating 
committee for the year, succeed- 
ing Mrs. Gordon B. Wilkes. Mrs. 
F. Marsena Butts, Mrs. Frank 
R. Clark- and Mrs. Ernest P. 
Railsback will succeed them- 
selves as chairmen of the pur- 
chasing, membership and pub- 
licity committees respectively. 

Mrs. Alexander M. Wolfe was 
presented to the directors by 
Mrs. Walker as the chairman of 
the eighth annual bridge to be 
held by the association on May 
14th. Mrs. Wolfe will announce 
her ticket chairman and other 
assisting chairmen at the March 
meeting. 

Mrs. Stanley W. Hobbs, direct- 
or of Volunteers for Newton- 
Wellesley hospital, spoke briefly, 
again stressing the need of con- 
tinued service by volunteers. 
While fifty volunteers are serv- 
ing the hospital each day the 
number has decreased and addi- 
tional recruits are needed, 
i Mrs. Walker gave a report of 
the recent meeting of the Coun- 
! cil of Hospital Auxiliaries, held 
at the Council headquarters on 
Brom field street, Boston, which 
she attended accompanied by 
Mrs. Hobbs. Reports were also 
given by Mrs. Francis F. Wil- 
liams, manager of the Benefit 
Shop, and Miss Florence D. Mar- 
ble, treasurer of the Coffee and 
Gift Shop. 

Mrs. Carl G. Johnson and Mrs. 
j Cecil W. Clark were hostesses at 
’ morning coffee at the close of the 
meeting and pourers were Mrs. 
Frank R. Clark and Mrs. Robert 
Whit chill. 

Thomas E. Dewey. He is easily 
the G.O.P.’s leading liberal. He 1 
i is sound, intelligent and forward- 
looking. Unlike many public J 
speakers, he does NOT pull his . 
punches. Furthermore, even 
i though he may seem to some to ' 
adopt a middle of the road course i 
i on a few controversial issues, [ 
[ such as the current labor and ; 
management controversy, a close 
study of his remarks will imme- 
diately reassure you. He has tin* 
faculty of thoroughly understand- 1 
ing both sides of a problem and I 
he does not hesitate to give the 
other side full credit for sincer- ' 
it y and good faith. 

Next week I shall have more 
to say about this speech. In the 
meantime, it is worth pointing 
out that our own former Senator 
Sinclair Weeks was given the 
honor of introducink Gov. Stas 
sen and he did a great job. 

p.w.c. 


ARTIFICIAL TEETH 
REPAIRED 

'service 

f?Y EXPERTS 

7<l OIIN viKt.KT SMVrOMIIIl 

BIGuiow 7033 


— O — 

The Angler School Parents 
Group meeting at the Angier 
School Auditorium, Monday, Feb- 
ruary 4. proved interesting to 
the large number of Waban par- 
ents and residents who attended. 

The meeting was a review by 
Dr. Homer W. Anderson, Super- 
intendent of Newton Schools, of 
the city wide school building sit- 
uation as related to the physical 
condition, capacity and location 
of present buildings and the pres- 
entation of a suggested building 
program to meet many import- 
ant objectives. Dr. Anderson’s 
suggested plan would utilize all 
buildings currently adequate for 
modern educational activities, 
provide for the replacement of 
schools unfit for continued use 
and projects the construction of 
three additional schools necessary 
to meet current and early future 
requirements. 

Lantern slides were shown to 
graphically indicate present and 
. proposed school locations and the 
1 relation of these locations to stu- 
dent population. The proposed 
! plan would provide for the relo- 
cation of schools being replaced 
and the logical location of addi- 
tional schools for city wide dis- 
tribution of facilities. Such a 
plan would give consideration to 
rapid growth areas and also 
greatly reduce present transpor- 
tation problems both with rela- 
tion to hazards, expense and con- 
venience. 

Obviously some building pro- 
gram should promptly be in- 
augurated that would parallel 
city growth and to compensate 
for normal progress necessarily 
halted during the war period. 
An interesting feature of the pro- 
posed plan, when completed, is 
that it would require, in addi- 
| tion to replacements, only three 
new schools; 1 elementary, 1 Jun- 
ior high school and 1 Senior high 
school. Thus, with some modi- 
fications of schools retained, the 
plan would increase the city' 
school capacity materially with- 
out proportionate Increase in the 
number of buildings provided. 

The City of Newton is indeed 
fortunate to have as a Superin- 
tendent a man ot the experience 
and vision of Dr. Anderson and 
il other residents and parents of 
the city are as enthusiastic about 
his plans as those in attendance 
at this meeting the city may an- 
ticipate a school plan of which 
they can be proud. 

Mr. Charlesworth K. Neilson, 
President of the Angier Parents 
Group, Mr. Fred T. Harvey, 
Chairman of the Building Com- 
mittee of the Nvwton Council of 
Parent-Teacher Association, Mrs. 
B. A. Thresher, member of the 
School Committee and Mr. J. 
Dexter Harris, Chairman of the 
Building Committee of the An- 
gier Parents Group of Waban 
aided greatly in an active ques- 
tion and answer discussion fol- 
lowing Dr. Anderson’s presenta- 
tion. 


EARLY AMERICAN 
DECORATION 

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DOROTHY FREDEY l46Jowet»St. 
LASell 2706 Newton 


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Method* Equipment 
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NEWTON IN THE PAST 

— o — 

55 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 13, 1891 

A number of employers of the 
Dudley Mills enjoyed a sleigh ride 
to Jamaica Plain, Wednesday 
evening. Fitzgerald's large sleigh 
being the conveyance. 

In unlacing a shoe with the 
present style of hook the wearer 
must take the laces entirely 
away from the hooks before the 
shoe can be removed. By a new 
invention the laces on either side 
are run in raised eyelets. To take 
the shoe off the wearer simply 
pulls the top of the shoe open 
without removing the laces from 
the hooks. When the shoe is put 
on it is securely fastened by pul- 
ling the upper ends of the two 
laces. The shoe is laced in a sec- 
ond. With this patent, it is 
claimed, a lace shoe can be fas- 
tened as quickly as a man can 
put on a Congress shoe. — From 
New York Telegram. 

A petition is in circulation to 
j get the Newton Street railway to 
continue their line to Newton 
Highlands and Upper Falls, and 
is receiving that signatures of all 
the more prominent men here. 

50 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 14, 1896 

The new Adams school build- 
ing (Newtonville) is about com- 
pleted, and forms one of the fin- 
est in the city. The interior is 
finished entirely in ash and has 
been completed In a most work- 
manlike manner. The furniture 
will be placed in position as 
quickly as possible. 

The trustees of the Methodist 
church have decided to drop the 
word "Corner” from the society’s 
name, so it now reads Newton 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

The Newton Democratic ward 
and city committee was organ- 
ized Tuesday evening for 1896 by 
the choice of Lawrence Bond of 
West Newton for chairman, D. J. 
Gallagher for secretary and W. 
F. Woodman for treasurer. Dr. 
F. W. Webber and H. E. Burrage 
were chosen to vacancies. 

— o — 

25 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 11, 1921 

Middlesex Court No. 60, MCOF, 
of Newton, will celebrate its 35th 
anniversary on Thursday evening, 
Feb. 17, 1921, with a supper and 
concert for members in Odd Fel- 
lows Hall, Newtonville. 

Bray Hall, Newton Centre, was 
filled both Friday and Saturday 
nights when the long heralded 
Minstrel Show was given by the 
men for the benefit of the Build- 
ing Fund of the Newton Centre 
Woman’s Club. 

The memorial tablet to the 
members of the Newton High 
School who died in the late war 
will be suitably dedicated on 
Sunday. 

British War Bride 
Heard Over WC0P 
On Arrival inN. Y. 

- o — 

Mrs. Jacob Sieged, wife of T-5 
j Jacob Siegel of Newton Center, 

I was heard in an interview broad- 
cast over station WCOP on her 
arrival in New York from Eng- 
land on Monday. 

Mrs. Siegel arrived with Brit- 
ish war brides here to join their 
husbands. The WCOP inter- 
views with Greater Boston brides 
Ivas made in New York. 



A. A. KENNELS 

Mr*. Emmett VVarburlea 
UOOS TRIMMED 
UOAHUKD anO KOH HALS 



741 Nahantun SI.. Newton Centra 
BIOolow 8400 


PIANO TUNING 

! New Cuatomrri Pirate Place Order* 
Now for March Schedule 
I Regular Cuaioinrra Phone Now 

Heavy Mat Wallin* 

John W. Tapper 

i.ASeii isoe 


AXMINSTER FIGURED 
CARPETS 
(9 It. wide) 
MOTTLE VELVET 
27 in. CARPETS 
Blue • Red - Green 
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< ull MU. ItOIIINSON, former- 
ly wilh Paine Furniture Co., 
WAT. 1763 for estimates snd 
appointment at your home. 


t 

ON THE INSIDE 

by MARVIN R. GOULD 


Sophomore elections were held at Newton High last week and 
all of the officers elected in my opinion will be an honor to their 
class, school, friends, and country. Those elected were: Prraidvnft, 
Tony Orlandclla; Vice-president, Don Fitzpatrick; Secretary, Celeste 
Lombardi; Treasurer, Jean Hubley. At this point I would like very 
much to say a few words about Tony Orlandclla, President of the 
Sophomore Class. Tony is 16 years old and was elected secretary 
of his class while in the seventh grade at Weeks. Tony is liked 
by everyone chiefly because he is the type of fellow who likes every- 
one. He is a fine singer and was one of the main attractions at the 
sophomore class party this year. Best of luck, Tony, in your new 
job as sophomore class president. I know that you will make good 
just as much as every other student in N.H.S. knows that you will 
do a fine Job. 

Corporal Sidney D. Cook, N.H.S. graduate is home again at 
West Newton after serving overseas with the P-38 Ringmasters of 
the 13th Air Force in the Philippines . . . Major J. Joseph Ward has 
returned to his old post as printing Instructor at the Newton Trade 
School after an absence of more than three years. Major Ward was 
stationed at Camp Edwards while he was in the Army . . . Major 
Wilson, former N.H.S. basketball coach is home again after three 
years in the Army . . . 

The following officers were elected at the Newton Student Can- 
teen last week: Hostess Chairman, Dorothy Sabbott: Host Chair- 
man, Dick Young; Personnel, Tony Orlandollo and Joan Nimms; 
Membership, Virginia McCourt; Publicity, Don Cox and Pat Dris- 
coll; Coke, Brine Boulter; Fountain, Bill Boulter; Maintenance, 
Jerry Quinlan and Carol Quigley; Entertainment, Sib Moriana; 
Desk, Phillis Callahan; President, A1 Visco; Vice-President, Nancy 
Kimball; Secretary, Ruth McMahn; Treasurer, Jean Hurly. 

Here is some news from Weeks Junior High School: 7th grade 
class officers just elected: President, Ralph Bibbo; Vice-President, 
Ellen Berman; Secretary, Addle Lisman; Treasurer, Ronald Jenkins. 
Weeks now has a real cooperative store run by a committee from 
the Student Council and others of the student body. Pupils may 
buy membership cards, or shares, and will have a 10% refund of 
their purchases returned in June. (Note: Long wait.) E\ erything 
from bobby pins to pencils is sold. A portrait of the late John Win- 
gate Weeks, for whom the school is named, was presented recently 
to the school by the Weeks family. Present at the ceremonies 
were: Senator Sinclair Weeks; Mr. Cabot, Chairman of the School 
Committee, and Dr. Homer W. Anderson, Superintendent of Newton 
Schools. 

Chi Beta Phi, Newton’s outstanding fraternity has announced 
that their annual Washington’s Birthday Ball will feature the ver- 
satile dance band of Freddie Dancon. (Sounds good) . . . Sylvia 
Gruber and Jean Fogg are now in the process of painting a new set 
of Murals for the Newton Student Canteen . . . Pfc. Robert Harris 
is home on 14 days leave from Fort Jackson, South Carolina . . . 
Dave Pynchon, ace goal tender of last yea!*, was home on leave last 
week-end from the U. S. Navy . . . Joe Vespa, of football fame last 
year was home recently on nine days vacation from "Unrle Sam” 
in Maryland . . . Bob Fisher is home on thirty days leave. His ship, 
the Seaplane Tender, U.S.S. Currituck, is tied up at Frisco. (Patty 
Easterbrook must like, I mean Iovp, this. The ship, of course, what 
else?) 

ATTENTION, certain motion picture theatre owners! How 
come servicemen now pay full price in some theatres now that the 
war is over? Some certainly seemed a lot more grateful and oblig- 
ing to these same boys when the war was on. I wonder why? 
Hmpf! Even an apprentice idiot, studying to be a moron, could tell 
you the answer to my last question. At least when these same boys 
are at camp they can see movies gratis. 

After a little “On the Inside” investigation, yours truly has 
found out why the executive committee has not taken action on the 
class reunion bill. It seems that the author of this bill neglected to 
notify the committee officially, in writing, or in the form of a mo- 
tion. Therefore, it was impossible for the committee to take action 
on the bill as they were never officially informed of the bill. 

M.R.G. 




FOR 


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14. 1946 


Breakfast- 

( Continued from Pdge 1) 
challenge, the speaker commenc- 
ed with the basic principle of 
Christianity, that 1000 years ago, 
Jesus Christ true God, been me 
man for the salvation of the 
human race. During His hree 
years of public life, Christ laid 
down the principles whereby man 
might work out his soul's sal- 
vation and before His death He 
founded His Church which was 
to teach, these principles to all 
the nations of the earth and 
which was to endure until the 
end of time. 

Eacn and every member of that 
Church is a branch thereof and 
carries the responsibility of 
being a Christ bearer, in his 
home, his business, in Govern- 
ment or in whatever walk of 
life a man might be placed. 

A Christian shirks his duty 
when he hears Christ’s princi- 
ples assailed and remains s*cnt. 
Every time he does that, he 
weakens the power of Christ 
•on earth and strengthens the 
power of His enemy who is the 
Devil working through the agen- 
cy of the so called liberal minds 
of the day or through the fan- 
aticism of the former Nazi lead- 
ers of Germany, the Fascists of 
Italy or the atheistic Commu- 
nists of Russia. 

If the world fails to do the 
will of God as given through His 
divine Son, our Lord Jesus Christ 
who speaks to us through His 
Vicar on earth, our Holy Father 
the Pope, chaos for the human 
race is the alternative. 

If only every member of 
Christ’s Church on earth 'and 
the membership numbers 330 
millions) actually realizes the j 
worth of his membership, his , 
most precious possession and at ! 
the same time is able and ever I 
ready to defend and proclaim | 
what he believes, then slowly I 
but surely the forces of evil in I 
the world will be overcome and 
Christ will reign in the minds 
and hearts of all mankind. 


Alan Booth- 

(Continued, from Page 1) 
ience and the March concert 
should be even more successful 
in that the soloist will be Alan 
Booth, who graduates from Ober- 
lin College this year where he 
has specialized in music. This 
appearance will be the first op- 
portunity which Mr. Booth has 
had to play for a discriminating 
and musical audience in the 
east, though he has appeared suc- 
cessfully in concert and recital 
while at Oberlin. 

Alan Booth's appearance at the 
March concert will be anticipated 
by his many high school friends, 
as well as the faculty, who have 
shown real interest in his pro- 
gress. Alan, as he is so well 
known, grew up in the city of 
Newton, studied first the piano 
with the conductor of the club, 
D. Ralph Maclean, and later the 
organ. With this background, 
he went to Oberlin not only well 
grounded in music but with the 
enthusiasm and ambition to 
make the most of the outstand- 
ing musical advantages for which 
Oberlin is noted. With a char- 
acteristic modesty and fervor, 
Alan Booth has an excellent op- 
portunity to take his place in 
the present generation of young. 
Negro artists. 

An unusual and attractive pro- 
gram has been selected by Ralph 
Maclean and Cecil Hall, chairman 
of the music committee, and dur- 
ing the weeks intervening you 
will be reminded, through the 
columns of this paper, the date 
which the club has with its spon- 
sors on March 19, in the hope that 
you will not only all be out but 
avail yourselves of the oppor- 
tunity to invite your friends to 
become sponsoring members or 
purchase tickets at the door. 


Boy Scouts- 

( Continued from Page t) 

I Commander John T. Foley, US- 
NR, addressed the gathering on 
the subject, "A Priest Aboard 
Our Fighting Ships.” The Rev- 
erend Foley presented a graphic 
picture on the invasions of the 
South Pacific campaign. He em- 
phasized the value of Scout 
training and staled examples of 
fighting men who practiced the 
ideals of the Scout Oath and Law, 
particularly those parts which 
state that a Scout is Brave— 
Clean Reverent. 

Scouting and Cubbing songs 
were sung throughout the break- 
fast program and led by Norum- 
bega’s Cubbing chairman, George 
Shannon. The Reverend Tag- 
lino pronounced the Benediction. 

A Vesper Service for Scouting 
of Protestant Faith took place 
in the afternoon at the Second 
Church in West Newton. The 
Reverend M. Russell Boynton, 
Chaplain for Scouts of Protest 
ant Faith, conducted the service. 
The Reverend Frederick M. Moi 
ris of Trinity P.E. Church, New- 
ton Centre, gave the sermon. He 
pointed out the importance of tin- 
ideals of the Scout oath and law 
and reminded the Scouts and 
Scout Leaders that these idea/s 
are a code for daily living. He 
stated that forbearance and for- 
giveness are virtues to be prac- 
ticed by all. A Bugler Quartet 
from Troop 83, Wellesley, began 
the service with church call. Com- 
missioner F. Brittain Kennedy 
led a memorial prayer and also 
the Scout oath. Eagle Scout Pet- 
er Cummings conducted the tri- 
bute to the national colors. The 
Commissioner’s staff, Scoutmas- 
ters, committeemen, and* Scout 
Executive, Robert E. Pettit, took 
part in the service. Scoutmaster 
Harold Ammidon of Troop 7C, 
his committee, and Scouts of his 
troop acted as hosts, marshals 
and ushers. Scouts of Troop 7C 
presented the colors during the 
service. 

o 

Red Cross- 

I Continued from Page 1) 

tion. At the close of hostilities 
it had nearly 9,500 workers over- 
seas engaged in welfare, hospital, 
club, and canteen work, besides 
more than 9,000 in the United 
States. The Red Cross was oper- 
ating 820 clubs and rest homes, 
with no immediate letup in the 
! need for them in sight. 

! After cessation of hostilities 
in Europe the need for Red Cross 
! continuance there became abund- 
I antly clear. And in the Pacific 
| the recreation problem for Am- 
! erican forces is even greater than 
. that in Europe. Few islands of- 
! for anything in the way of 
amusement, American style, 
j At home, recreation and wel- 
| fare services are being continued 
for able-bodied men in camps 
i and naval bases and for the 
thousands of hospitalized, large 
| numbers of whom will need Red 
! Cross attention for months. Red 
Cross work with veterans is ex- 
pected to show a sharp rise dur- 
! ing tht? next five or six years 
as millions of men are discharg- 
ed from the armed forces. 

The Red Cross, never exclu- 
sively a war agency, will have 
increased postwar usefulness In 
its regular services such as dis- 
aster relief, first aid— which is 
being called for more and more 
by industrial plants and work- 
ers water safety, and accident 
prevention. 

The Village quotas for both the 
Advanced Gifts and Residential 
Divisions are as follows: 

Newton Centre 


~ 

iur RED CROSS 

lust carry on! 

r 



THE NEWTON GRAPHIC_ 

Newton Centre 


PAGE THREE 


Upper Falls 


RED CROSS POSTER— During the month of March, which 
has been designated by President Truman as Red Cross 
month, this poster and the slogan "Your Red Cross Must 
Carry On,” will be seen in every public place in all cities 
and towns throughout the natiort. The picture on the poster, 
of a Red Cross worker and patient, was made on the 
grounds of a military hospital in New Caledonia. 


He only is wretched and mis- 
erable who thinks himself so. 


Auburndale 

$1,100 

$4,000 

Chestnut Hill 

’ 5,300 

2,200 

Newton 

4,300 

6,400 

Newton Centre 



t Waban Hill i 

4,300 

9,700 

Newton High. 

1,100 

4,000 

Newton L. Falls 


650 

Newton U. Fails 


1,000 

Newtonville 

2,000 

6,000 

Nonantum 


580 

Oak Hill 

1,500 

2,000 

Waban 

2,600 

6,400 

West Newton 

8,400 

7,200 


HERTEL ELECTRIC CO. 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 


Franchise Dealer 


WESTINGHOUSE -- 
CROSLEY -• 

1345 WASHINGTON STREET 


BLACKSTONE 

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Somebody looking at the bach of i/our neck ? ' 


/\ 


-/ 





J 


Hospital- 

(Continued from Page l) 

pital adequate to existing needs," 

• advised his listeners. 

The great metropolitan hos- 
pitals, he stated, should carry on 
the greater part of the research, 
be available to give assistance in 
difficult matters of diagnosis and 
meet local needs, but that local 
hospitals of adequate size should 
be prepared to meet the major 
part of the requirements of the 
people in their vicinity. 

"Among suburban hospitals, 
Newton-Wellesley is already in 
the lead,” Mr. Farley said. "I can 
think of only one other that is 
comparable in general excellence 
and reputation. But you can’t 
j keep your position unless you 
I meet the challenge you now 
: have.” 

Predicting ever-increasing pub- 
! lie demands for admission to hos- 
pitals everywhere, Mr. Farley de- 
clared that Newton and Welles- 
ley enjoyed a reputation for meet- 
ing their own obligations and 
those to the larger community of 
cities. "You always have taken 
the lead. You have an obligation 
of not only keeping up your own 
standards but of keeping your su- 
premacy in the eyes of others," 
he said. 

"You can’t find any other ac- 
tivity that can give you the same 
satisfaction as that which will 
come from developing your hos- 
pital. However little you can do 
or however much you may do, 
you can find no deeper reward. 
I’m sure you will succeed, be- , 
cause you have a cause which is 
beyond criticism. God bless you 
as you try it," Mr. Farley con- 
cluded. 

Mr. Leonard took as the theme 
of his brief address the need for 
greater accommodations and fa- 
cilities as cited in Mr. Hartman’s 
annual report read by Miss Story. , 
During the present month, the re- 
port stated, 231 of the 237 beds 
available in the hospital were oc- 1 
cupicd on one day, not to mention 
the existence of a waiting list of 
approximately 60. 

! The situation makes it plain, 
Mr. Leonard commented, that 
| there is almost no margin of 
safety at Newton-Wellesley Hos- 
pital and that when emergency 
cases are numerous, less urgent 
ca^s have to be turned away. De- 
spite the existing handicaps, 
there were no maternal deaths 
last year and no beds, floors or 
wards were closed. He advocated 
a policy of aggressiveness in the 
prosecution of the $2,250,000 
building fund project, to the end 
that the hospital be enabled to 
care for all who may require its 
services. 

Mr. Walker, who acted as mast- 
er of ceremonies, opened the 
meeting by reading Valentine 
limericks in honor of the guests. 

The slate of officers re-elected 
with Mr. Walker included Clar- 
ence G. McDavitt of Newtonville, 
first vice president : Paul T. Bab- 
son of Wellesley, second vice pres- 
ident; and C. Raymond Cabot of 
Newtonville, clerk. Donald P. 
Perry of West Newton was elect- 
ed treasurer and Henry T. Hunk- 
er of Newton Center, assistant 
treasurer. 

Miss Marion H. Niles of Welles- 
ley, president of the Friendly Aid 
Association, was chosen to serve 
the unexpired term of Miss Mary 
C. Sawyer, deceased, and S. Wll- : 
lard Bridges of Wellesley was 
named to a five-year term on the 
board of trustees. Both were 
elected members of the hospital 
corporation. 

Trustees re-elected for terms 


to expire in 1951 were Mr. Bab- 
son, Mr. Cabot, Marshall B. Dal- 
ton of West Newton, Mrs. Charles 
B. Floyd of Aflburndalc, Benja- 
j min W. Guernsey of Wellesley, 
Mrs. Fred R. Hayward of Newton 
Highlands, E. Prentiss Jones of 
Newton Center, John A. Paine of 
West Newton, Wickliffe J. 
Spaulding of Auburndalo, Mrs. 
Vernon B. Swett of Newton and 
Mrs. Theron B. Walker of New- 
ton Highlands. 

In his annual report read by 
Miss Story, Mr. Hartman stated 
that the American College of Sur- 
geons, which decides whether hos- 
pitals are meeting minimum stan- 
dards. had given its approval to 
Newton-Wellesley. The inspector, 
he related, was impressed with 
the sharp contrast between the 
newer portions of the hospital 
and the old. 

Among the measures adopted 
' to improve safety and facilities 
Mr. Hartman listed rehabilitation 
of the boiler plant with $7,000 
from the Community Chest and 
the installation of new fire es- 
capes in Founders Memorial. De- 
spite war-time restrictions, the 
director continued, extensive 1 
sound-proofing was completed 
and general cleanliness maintain- 
ed. Other physical improvements 
mentioned were the creation of 
waiting rooms in the maternity 
department and on the accident 
floor, with the help of the Hos- 
pital Aid Association. 

The director listed outstand- 
ing developments in the field of ! 
service as completion of a modern 
medical anesthesia department 
which administered to a total of 
3,831, creation of a department 
of occupational therapy under a 
therapist formerly with the Re- 
habilitation Hospital of New 
York City and the consolidation 
of the nurses’ and medical library 
into a single library through the 
generosity of the Hospital Aid 
Association and through gifts in 
excess of $1,000 from the medical 
staff. 

The year 19-15 also saw estab- 
lishment of the department of 
volunteers under the direction of 
Mrs. Mabel H. Hobbs, R.N., Mr. 
Hartman reported, to coordinate 
the work of 597 independents who 
gave 18,195 hours of servive 
and Red Cross workers who 
gave 59,330 hours. Remarking 
that 20 Red Cross nurses’ aides 
are now undergoing a training 
course, he asserted that there re- 
mains an acute need for volun- 
teers, who, he noted in passing, 
"by serving within our walls, 
have learned much and arc the 
best interpreters t>f our service 
from a pubiio relations stand- 
point." 

In addition Mr. Hartman re- 
ported great progress in the de- 
velopment of the hospital's post- 
graduate medical education pro- 
gram. calling attention to the 
fact that from one residency the 
number had increased to seven 
in various fields. 

Newton-Wellesley Hospital was 
tiie second highest in the state 
from tiie standpoint of Blue Cross 
utilization, he said, payments 
having increased from $51,111 in 
1941 to $164,157 in 1945, or ap- 
proximately 25 percent of the 
hospital’s income budget in the 
latter year. 

In conclusion the director said 
the hospital, which must stand 
ready to admit anyone In New- 
ton and Wellesley who require 
service, deserve and needs the 
support of everyone in those com- 
munities. "During the past year," 
he said, "we have operated tiie 
hospital with the highest possible 
patient load. At no times have we 
had to shut down beds. For tills 


Miss Barbara Hoyt, daughter 
of Lieut., and Mrs. Carter H. 
Hoyt, of 83 Summer street, at- 
tended the dance and enjoyed 
the hayride which preceded an 
informal dance at, the "Kims” 
for the senior class at, the House 
in the Pines School. Norton. 

— o — 

Mr. and Mrs. Roland A. Pett 
of 52 Clinton Place, are spending 
a one month vacation at the 
Hotel Seventy Ninth Street, 
Miami. This is the third year 
i the Pelts have been winter vis- 
itors at Miami. 

-o— 

Miss Caroline Clough, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Willis B. Clough 
of 132 Pleasant street, was the 
winner of the bareback event in 
the first horse show held Fri- 
day, February 9 in which -'bout 
50 students of Radcliffe and 
Jackson Colleges participated. 
She also won fourth place in the 
advanced riding class. Miss 
Clough is a graduate of Dan 
Hall, class of 1944. 

o — 

Newtonville 

o 

Miss Constance Cleveland, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thom- 
as V. Cleveland, of 27 Whitney 
road was the chairman of a 
committee which had charge of 
an informal dance at the "Elms” 
for the senior class at House 
in the Pines, Norton. This af- 
fair was preceded by a hayride 
in and around Norton. 

— o — 

R. Leonard White of 199 Har- 
vard circle has been awarded a 
Fellowship in Pathology at Tufts 
Medical School" during his sen- 
ior year. 


The Emerson School Horn*' As- 
sociation held their monthly 
meeting in the school kindergar- 
ten on Monday February 11. at 
8 p. m. The president, Mrs G. 
Louis Marcy presided at the 
business meeting which was fol- 
lowed by a movie on safety con- 
trol by the guest speaker. Mr 
Simpson of the Student Patrol 
of the Newton High School. 
o 

Rev. A. K. Fillmore, pastor of 
the 2nd Baptist f’hurch will 
preach on Sunday February 17, 
at 10 30 n 

_ 0 _ . 

Rev. W. Henry Shillington, 
pastor of the First Methodist 
Church, will pfeach Sunday Feb- 
ruary 17, at 10 45 a. m. from the 
topic, "How is Your Faith ’ and 
at 7:00 p. m. from the topic, 
"Facing Uncertainty.” 

o 

A servief* of worship will be 
held at the Stone Institute on 
Sunday, February 17. at 4 00 
p. m. with Rev. C. A. Wood of 
the Immanuel Baptist Church, 
officiating. 

o 

The Kum-a-Luc Club will meet 
on Thursday, February 21 at 
the homo of Mrs. Ida Borgensen 
of 8 Columbia road. Newton Up- 
per Falls at 8:00 p. m. 

o 

Group 4. of the Woman’s So- 
ciety of Christian Service of the 
First Methodist Church held a 
Silver Tea at the home of Mrs. 
C. R. Brown of Linden street on 
Tuesday February 12. at 1.30 
p. m. 


Upper Falls 


The Daughters of the British 
Empire, Temple Court Chapter, 
met Wednesday afternoon at the 
home of Mrs. Raymond E. Board- 
man, 53 Thurston road. Mrs. John 
H. Springham of Summer street 
was co-hostess. The ladies sewed 
for war orphans. 

The Vinoent Club were the 
guests of Mrs. John D. Coward 
of High street, at a Wentine 
party on Tuesday evening. 

Mrs. George Boston of High 
street will be the hostess and Mrs. 
Herbert McDonald of Rockland 
place will serve as co-hostess on 
Monday evening at the meeting 
of the Upper Falls Chapter of the 
Daughters of the British Empire, 
to be held at Mrs. Boston’s home. 
All ladies from the British Em- 
pire are invited to be present. 

we owe our undying thanks to 
our volunteers, our employees, 
medical staff, nurses and student 
nurses, and all others who con- 
tributed their time and active 
support.” 

Seated with the speakers were 
Dr. Frank R. Clark, M.D., chair- 
man of the executive committee 
of the medical staff; Miss Mabel 
McVicker, principal of the school 
of nursing; Rabbi Samuel N. 
Sherman of Temple Emanuel, 
Newton Centre; Mrs. Theron B. 
Walker, president of the Hospital 
Aid Association; E. Prentiss 
Jones, chairman of the board of 
directors, school of nursing: Dr. 
Franklin P. Lowry, president of 
the medical staff: Miss Margue- 
rite Hastings, president of the 
alumnae, school of nursing; Mrs. 
Endicott P. Saltonstall. chairman 
of the memorial gifts committee 
of the building fund; C. Raymond 
Cabot, clerk; Donal'd P. Perry, 
treasurer; Clarence G. McDavitt. 
first vice president; Mrs. Clifford 
H. Walker, wife of the president; 
and W. Elliot Pratt Jr., chairman 
of the Wellesley memorial gifts 
committee. 


Middles, x, ** PKORATK I'Ol'ltX 

To all |irrs i s Interest?!! in tlw 


Cnrnrlla Y. Ituliln-on 

l.itr* of Newton In Mid -viint 
ceased. 

A petition h.*.« bui 
said t’ourt for p: hit. or a < 

instrument pm p'ltinE i" be tit** l > - 
will of said .I.- -i«i.l by M ib 'm .\ 
Warren of N.uton in -ad i\ mn:> 
praying that In* be appointed o\e. u 
tor thereof, without gmni; a Mirct: 


Pfc. James Arbuckle ot the 
U. S. Field Artillery who has 
returned from fifteen months’ 
service in the European Area, 
was honorably discharged on NGWiOll 
Monday February 11, and is re- 
siding with his parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. James Arbuckle of 
Pennsylvania avenue. 


Ens Eastman 

(Continued from Page 1) 

versity, Ensign Eastman engag 
rd in research work with Arthur 
D. Little Co. for the National De- 
fense Research Committee and 
was awarded t hr* certificate of 
recognition for effective service. 
Transferred to Yale University 
by the Navy, he graduated with 
Bachelor of Engineering Degree 
before entering active service 
aboard the USS Baldwin DD621 
He remained with that destroyer 
until its recent arrival for de- 
commissioning at Charleston. 
S. C. He participated in anti 
submarine work in New Eng- 
land. North Atlantic and Medi- 
terranean waters, as well as the 
interesting voyage to North Af- 
rica and Egypt as escort to'thi 
USS Quincy, carrying President 
Roosevelt to and from the Yalta 
Conference. After Germany’s de- 
feat, the Baldwin operated with 
the Third and Seventh Fleets in 
the Pacific area, participating in 
the initial occupation of Sasebo 
Naval Base, Japan, and serving 
as flagship for mineswef.pjng op- 
erations in the Yangtze River to 
open Shanghai for shipping. The 
Baldwin later engaged in sweeps 
of Formosa Straits. Korea, and 
civil administration of the Island 
of Taiwan. In the last several 
months of these operations. En 
sign Eastman was Engineer Of- 
ficer of the destroyer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eastman have a 
wide acquaintance in this local- 
ity. Both are graduates of New- 
ton High School. Mrs. Eastman 
is a graduate of Framingham 
Teachers College, and is well 
known through her work with 
the Newton Nutrition Center. 


The Emerson School and Home 
Asociation held a very success- 
ful Bridge and Whist Party on 
January 31 in the Emerson 
School Kindergarten. 


The Choir Guild of the First 
Methodist Church will hold a 
party following the Choir Re- 
hearsal on Friday. February 22. 

o — 

The Fortnighters of the First 
Methodist Church will hold a 
supper and business meeting at 
7:00 p. rn. Saturday February 
16. in the Parish Hall, which 
will be followed by a Valentine 
party. 

o 

Rev. W. Henry Shillington has 
been elected Secretary of the 
Newton Council of Churches 


Phyllis J. Burt, daughhter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ashley D. Burr of 
25 Church street. Newton, and 
a student at Pembroke College 
in Brown University was a 
member of the committee which 
arranged a pre* Valentine’s Day 
party for her dormitory. Miss 
Burt, a graduate of the Newton 
High School is a freshman at 
Pembroke, where she is vice- 
president of her dormitory and 
a member of the Dance Club 


Paul Troiani now serving with 
the armed forces at Fort 'aw- 
ton. Washington has been pro- 
moted to Technician Fourth 
Grade, it is announced by Col- 
onc*l P. B. Parker. Area Com- 
mander. T-4 Troiani is the son 
of Mrs. Mary Troiani of 6 Rem* 
ick Terrace. 


The ushers serving for Feb- 
ruary at the First Methocist 
Church will be from the Fort- 
nighters' Group:— Kenneth Sta- 
ta. George A. Malanson, Calef 
E. Alexander Robert B. Proctor. 
Kenneth W. Newcomb, John C. 
MacMaster and Louis Remond. 
This group will alternate with 
the regular ushers each month. 

o 

The Flower Guild of the First 
Methodist Church met at the 
home of Miss Isabel Young 1272 
Boylston street. February 12. at 
S:00 p. m. 

o 

Storekeeper 3-c Margaret R. 
Collins, L T . S. Marines of New 
London Conn, spent the week- 
end with her parents Mr. and 
Mrs. Maurice J. Collins of 19 
Cottage street. 


Newton Lower Falls 

— o — 

The Couple’s Club c.' Saint 
Mary's Church will hold a bridge 
party in the Parish Hall on the 
evening of February 21st at 7:45. 
The public is invited to attend. 
There will be prizes for each 
table as well as a door prize. 
Refreshments will be served. 
Arrangements for the part; are 
in charge of Mrs. Herbert Reed 
and Mrs. Howard Lewis of St. 
Mary’s street. 


Family Service Bur. 
Re-elects All Oificers 
At Annual Meeting 

— o — 

Approval and commendation 
of the work done by officers of 
the Family Service Bureau of 
Newton. Inc., for the past year 
was expressed at the annual 
meeting of that Red Feather 
agency yesterday at the First 
Congregational Church when the 
officers for last year were unan- 
imously reelected for another 
194( i 

^ President. Mrs. William V. M. 
Fawcett; vice-presidents. Mrs 
William Z. Ripley. William B. 
Plumer, Neil Leonard; treasurer. 
Charles W. Blood; clerk. Clar- 
ence E. Churchill; corresponding 
secretary, Mrs. Sumner Pruyne. 

Members- of the board of di- 
rectors elected were For one 
year. Mrs. George H. Larsen: 
for two years. Rev. Martin J. 
Dolphin: for three years. Mrs. 
Edgar W. Burkhardt. Charles 
Raymond Cabot. Carl S. Crum 
mett. Mrs. Rufus Es»abrook, 
Mrs. Wm. V. M. Fawcett. Hon. 
P;-nii Goddard, Mrs. Durham 
Jones, Mrs F. Brittain Kennedy. 
Warren W Oliver. Wm. B. Plum- 
mer. Rabbi Samuel J. Sherman. 
Mrs. Lucius B. Thayer. Mrs. 
Chester W. Tudbury, Mrs. F. H 
L’nderhill. Clifford Walker. 

Richard B. Carter, chairman 
of the board, in presenting his 
report as chairman of the nom 
inating committee. expressed 
highest approbation of the ac- 
complishments of the officers for 
the year just ended and said it 
was the desire of his committee 
to have them continue to func- 
for another year. 

Miss Jane Ludy pointed out 
in her report of her first full 
year's activities as general sec- 
retary of the Bureau, that therp 
had been an increase in the 
number of families served, from 
342 in 1944 to 405 in 1945— a 
gain of 18';. while the number 
of families requiring financial 
assistance was somewhat less 
than the preceding year. "More 
and more” Miss Ludy said, 
“people of all income groups are 
coming to the Bureau for assist* 

. . ntang g t 

problems, whether it be budget- 
ary or the healthy adjustment 
of children. ' 

One of th< activities of th< 
Bureau which illustrates its pol- 
icy of prevention” in connec- 
tion with social problems, was 
brought out in Mrs. Ripley's re- 
port as chairman of the Camp 
Committee. She stated that 
great care was exercised in the 
selection of children sent to 
summer camps, special atten- 
tion being given to children 
where camp life would aid in 
their adjustment. There were 
1% children sent to camps. Mrs 
Ripley reported and their fami- 
lies contributed nearly one third 
of the expense, total of which 
amounted to $3,895. 


Dr. Gallup says 7 percent of 
the people polled hare no opin- 
ions. He’s mistaken. They are 
merely suspicious of strangers 
who ask them questions. — 
Bridgeport Post. 


Waban 


On February 7. the Musical 
Guild of Boston presented Cyn- 
thia Brown of Chestnut street 
as piano soloist in a concert held 
at the College Club on Common- 
wealth avenue, 


•rented 


Ills 


111 !. 


If you desire to ol»J« it thereto 
or your attorn, -v should a t i t t«-n 
appearance In said i’"ur: at ‘ * 1 ' >•- 
bridge before toil oVIo, n In tin* ft* 
noon on the fourth d iv < f M nvh l: n 
the return day of tins citation 
Wit) ' 1 ' 

First Judge of lutiil Court. th - 
eleventh day of February in the '• it" 
one thousand nine hundred and f >r> 




Visit your BARBER regularly 

it pays to Took w fiijbPN 

COMMUNITY BARBERS fttawton 

A SHOP Ot PHUtbSSlONAL SLKl ILE 


L. CONTE 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

Expert service to satisfy your desire. Alter or repair your home. 
Playroom re-modeling and cubinct work ure our specialties. 
Many Newton and Brookline residents have patronized our services. 

Telephone NEEdham 1309-M 


First Church of 
Christ, Scientist 
of Newton 

391 Walnut Street 
Newtonville 

SERVICES 

Sunday 10:45 A.M 

Sunday School 10:45 A M 

SVednesdnv Evening 8:00 P.M 

READING ROOM 

287 Walnut St.. Newtonville 
Open Daily • All Welcome 

Weekdays, except Wednes- 
days and Holidays.... 9 to 9 

Wednesdays .9 to 7:30 

Sundays and Holidays.... 2 to 5 
ri** Lending Llbreu include* the Bible 
■ Kina Jsmee »#r»ion> eh the wrltins* 
ot Mart H*k* i Cddt end n*i tuihen 
Us nioerephi** 


STONE INSTITUTE and 
NEWTON HOME for 
AGED PEOPLE 

tT7 Eliot St.. New inn l/pper fall*. 

Newton. Mat* 

This Home t» entires supported dj 
the generosity ol Newton citizen* and 
»« solicit tund* for endowment and 
enlargement of the Home. 

DIRECTORS 
Mrs Arthur .M Allen 
Un George \s Burnett 
Mrs 8tnnley Bo ster 
Albert t’ Carter 
Mr* Aider* P Carter 
W i ham K Chase 
Howard P Converse 
Marshall B Da. ton 
Mr» M B Dalton 
Mr* Times Dun. op 
Mr- W V M t-awcett 
M;« Mar.’ori* M Gardiner 
Mis I'aui M Qoddard 
Fran* J Hate 
Mrs \\ f Hardinc 
Mr- r red R Hayward 
T E Jewc: 

Reward W Jones 
Mrs Arthur v\ Lane 
Robert H Loorots 
Mr- Elmore J MacPhte 
Donald D McKay 
Metcalf W Me .her 
Mrs M i\ Melcher 
John E Peake- 
Mrs John t. Peases 
George E Raw ton 
Mrs George E Rawaon 
William H Rice 
Mrs Kreiu i Richardson 
Miss Mabel L Riley 
Mrs Charles A Bawin 
Un 

Mr* George S Smith 
Clifford H Walker 
Thomas A West 

METCALF W MKLCHER. President 
147 Lake Ale . Newton Cent's 
KOHEK1 H LOOM Its. treasurer 
t»0 Purest At*., West Newton 


We Of{tfer . . . 


Famous Name Lighters 

• BERKELEY • KEM 

• DUNHILL • EVANS 


Manv Name Er; 


ol Cigars by the Box 


li t' are featuring a complete selection of the 
fittest razor Itlatles 

• GILLETTE • MARLIN 

• PERSONNA • COOPER 

• GEM • BERKELEY 

• TRIANGLE • PAL 

• PROFESSIONAL 


A choice selection of line imported Briar Pipes 
SI. 50 - S2.50 - S3.3ST - S7.50 


TASTY — TEMPTING CANDIES 

• SchraHt's Chocolates 
• Homemade Tofty 
Economy Size — 29c - 49c - 98c 

Buddy's Smoke Shop 

»ur Personal Smoke >hoi»" 

295 Centre Street 
Newton Corner LAS. 9578 


CRAWFORD DOORS 

(Overhead type) 

lor GARAGES 

HU I IMIMtlli GIVEN 

For Information C all 
\\ V I I IM OW N 0396 


PAUSE 


to 

THINK 


Stop and Think It Over! 

You can pay interest for- 
ever on an old fashioned 
mortgage, yet never own a 
house! 

Keflnanee NOW! Increase 
your equity with every 

I 4 



NEWTON CENTRE 

SAVIN6S BANK 

104 UNION ST. • NEWTON CENTRE 




PAGE rOUR 


DR, FRANK A. JASSET 

Podiatrist — Chiropodist 

Now Locat'd at 

SBt CF.NTRK STREET 

NATIONAL BANK BLDG 


Curtains 



• COTTAGE SETS 

• DINETTE SETS 

• LUNCHEAN SETS 

• BRIDGE SETS 

• BUREAU SCARFS 

• 

The 

LAWRENCE 

SHOP 

1300 WASHINGTON STREET 
WEST NEWTON 

T *ro doors from 
West Newton Theatre 


WEDDINGS _| 

Dolen - Collins 

— o — 

Miss Virginia Ann Collins. ! 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mau- 
rice J. Collins of 19 Cottage 
street. Newton Upper Falls and 
Felix A. Dolan, son of Mrs. Julia 
Dolen of Jamaica Plain, were 
married on Saturday. February 
9. at the Mary Immaculate of 
Lourdes Church. Newton Upper 
Falls. The nine o'clock nuptial 
mass was performed by the pas 
tor. the Rev. William J. O'Con- 
nell. 

Given in marriage by her fath- 
er. the bride wore a gown of 
white lace, styled with a white j 
satin bodice. Hef finger tip veil ' 
was caught with orange blos- 
soms and she carried a shower 


ENGAGEMENTS 



Winnlfrcd Peckhnm Kahn 

Mrs. Clarence S. Peck ham of 


T H E NEWTON GRAPHIC 

NEWTON CHURCHES 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1946 


{Newton Episcopal 
Churches to Have 
Delegates at Meeting 

— o — 

The Episcopal churches of the 


THE ELIOT CHURCH 
OF NEWTON 

I)r. Ray A. Eusden, Minister 

Sunday 

9:30, Primary and Junior De- 
partments of the church school. 

10.45, Morning tervlce of wor- j 
ship with Dean Vaughan Dabney. | Newtons will send representa- 

10:45. Nursery and klndergar- , lives to the missionary meeting 
ten department of the church i to I**' held on Sunday i February 
school. i 17) at 4 p. m. in All Saints’ 

12:05. Young people's division: 'Church, 1773 Beacon street, 
Junior High. 'High school and El ! Brookline, where the Rev. Dr. 
iot Round Table. • Francis Cho Min Wei, president 

of Central China College, will 


RECENT DEATHS 


Monday, 10:00-4:00, Red Cross 
sewing unit. 

Tuesday, Woman's Association 
Group meetings: 

1:00, Group 4, Miss Florence 
Heard, leader, will meet with 
Mrs. David Black, 77 Park street. 


give the address. The choirs 
of four churches will sing and 
the Rev. Cornelius B. Trow- 
bridge of the Church of the Re- 
deemer, Chestnut Hill, is one of 
those actively participating. 

Dr. Wei and his college have 


1:00, Group 6. Mrs. Everett E. carried on under difficulties on 
Kent, leader, will meet with Mrs. the Burma frontier during the 
bouquet of white gladioli and Brockton announces the engage- Clarence K. Reiman, 171 Sargent past eight years that China has 
babys breath. The bride’s sister, ment of her daughter. Winnlfrcd street. 

Storekeeper. 3 c. Margaret R. Peekham Kahn of Fortehester, ' Gt-oiip 5. Mrs. Benjamin 

° . | S. Hinckley, leader, will meet 

Collins. U. S. Marine Corps, was V V. to Howard L. Vosburgh with Mvs . Charles E. Morrow, 70 
the maid of honor. She wore ~ 


of 20 Kimball terrace, Newton- Arlington street. Dessert will be 
gown of light blue net over blue vllle (served. 

taffeta with a matching head, . ™»| s . pr «d nurse of I 2:00 ' Grou P Mrs - Earl W. 

veil. Her bouquet combined yel- I she ' s » legtsteied nurse of Doug|as leaderi wj „ meet with 
low jonquils and delphinium. ; New York and Massachusetts, Mls Harold Berry, 4 St. James I 
Charles Dolen. of West Rox- having graduated from the Og- 1 terrace. Mrs. Benjamin Miller ! 
bury, was the best man for his den y.1 ills Training School in I will speak on "Experiences of a 


been at war. After this spring 
term, the College will return to 
its original site in Wuchang al- 
though the buildings are now 
only rubble. 


aid*: 

ft-L 



m 

JS 

1ELD 


brother. The ushers were Fran- 
cis J. Collins, of Needham, broth- 
er of the bride, and William Key- 
es, of Dedham, a brother-in-law 
of the groom. 

Following the ceremony a 
wedding breakfast and reception . , 

was held at the Miles blandish ^ ,1 


New York. She served in the 
U. S. Navy Nurse Corps for 
more than two years, and was a 
lieutenant, junior grade, when 
she was released to inactive 
duty on Jan. 4 of this year. At 


Hotel, Boston. Mr. and Mrs. Dol- 
en left by plane for New York 
and upon their return will live 
at 25 Kingsboro park. Jamaica 
Plain. 


NEW CITIZENS 


Your “ ONE 

and ONLY ” 

You expect to be married only 
once . . . and, of course, the 
marriage ceremony, the WED- 
DING RECEPTION must embody 
oil the troditions, all the beauty 
which the years have built around 
this most cherished day . . 
every detail must be perfect, hove 
the approval of "Emily Post." 
We ot The Beoconsfield can be 
of inestimable help . . . our 
trained staff will plan oil the 
details for Your Wedding Recep- 
tion, will moke oil arrangements, 
if you wish. One of our seven 
tastefully decorated rooms will 
provide a beautiful setting for this 
memorable occosion ... we shall 
be glad to show them to you 
. . . ond to suggest unusual 
menus. 

• • • 

The OVAL DINING ROOM is 

a popular rendezvous for Lun- 
cheon and DINNER . . . the 
food is prefectly delicious, the 
friendly, gracious atmosphere de- 
lightful. 

Luncheons ore from 80c to SI .25 
Dinner from $1.2t to $1.75 

Telephone ASPinwall 6800 

ROBERT B. STOCKING, 
General Manager 

Hotel Beacor.sfield 

.4 Sheraton Hotel 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis 
Gayer. Jr. (Dorothy Garritt> of 
West Newton announce the birth 
of a daughter. Wendy Burr Gay- 
er on February 9 at the Phillips 
House. 

Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert H. Garritt of West New- 
ton and Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. 
Gayer of Cincinnati, Ohio, form- 
erly of Weston. 

— o — 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Hassler Cap- 
ron of Newton Centre announce 
the birth of a son. John Saville 
Capron, 2nd, on February 8 
the Richardson House. 


staff of the United Hospital in 
Portchoster, N. Y. 

Mr. Vosburgh. son of Mrs. 
Arthur J. Vosburgh of Ames. 
N. Y.. is a graduate of Hamilton 
College in New York. He is em- 
ployed as a foreman-inspector by 
the Newton Street Department, 
and he lives with his aunt and 
uncle, Professor William L. Vos- 
burgh and Mrs. Vosburgh. 

The couple will be married on 
April 27 in Newton. 


Mr. and Mrs. A. Richard Mar- 
gulat of 50 Everett street. New- 
ton Centre, announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, 
Miss Jeanette S. Cary to Francis 
M. Grant of Brockton. No* im- 
mediate plans are made for the 
wedding. 

Miss Cary is a student at the 
School of Practical Art in Bos- 
ton. Mr. Grant is the son of 
at Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Grant, 
Sr. of Brockton. He has recently 


Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. returned from Europe where he 
Henry T. Clogston of Salem and served for twenty-two months 


Mr. and Mrs. John Saville Cap- 
ron of Newton Centre, 


CITY OF NEWTON 
Massachusetts 


with the 3rd Division. He was 
awarded the Bronze Star Medal 
and the Presidential Citation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Carey 
of Newtonville announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, 
Miss Barbara E. Carey to James 
M. Patterson, Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs. James M. Patterson, Sr., of 
Waban. 


NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

Sealed Proposals for furnish- 
ing the 1946 requirements of the 
Newton Street Department for 
gasoline of the grade termed 
“Regular”, as furnished to your 
filling stations, will be received 
at the office of the Street Com- 
missioner, City Hall, Newton 
Centre, Massachusetts, until 
10:30 A.M. Thursday, February 

21. 1946 at which time and place ' R7 c 'h ard Leston Carter. U. S. 
they will be publicly opened and Army Transportation Corps, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Leston 
Carter of 14 Roslyn road, Wab- 
an. 

Miss Bell attended the Holla- 


Nurses' Aid, 

2:30, Group 2, Mrs. Henry R. 
Condon, leader, will meet with 
Mrs. Clarence C. Smith. 626 Cen- 
tre street. 

2:30, Group 7, Mrs. Harold A. 
Wooster, leader, will meet with 
Mrs. Robert P. Waller, 83 Eld- 
redge street. Mrs. Barbara T. 
Stearns, executive secretary of 
the Newton Community Council, 
will speak. 

7:45, The Eliot Circle will meet 
with Mrs. Dean C. Cleveland, 18B 
Park street. Mrs. Walter C. Tong 
will speak on “They Stood By 
Us.” 

Wednesday. 3:30. Junior choir 
rehearsal. 5:00. Junior High choir 
rehearsal. 7:30, Church choir re- 
hearsal. 

Saturday, 2:00 American 
League basketball game, Eliot 
vs. St. John’s Methodist. 


NORTH CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 
Newton, Mass. 

(Next door to Raytheon) 
Arthur B. Clark, Minister 
Mrs. Arvid Swenson, 
Soloist-Choir Director 
George Russell Loud, Organist 
— o — 

Sunday, February 17th, 1946 
10:00 A.M. Church Schopl. 
George Kent, Supt., John Alex- 
ander, Assistant. 

10:45 A.M. Service of Divine 
Worship. Sermon Subject — 
“That’s the Way I See It.” Ser- 
mon to Juniors — “Where are You 
Going?” 


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
Newton Centre 

Rev. Charles N. Arbuckle, D.D. 
Rev. E. Spencer Parsons 

— o — 

Worship Service: 11:00 A. M 
Sermon by Dr. Arbuckle. Sub 
ject: “The Saving Health of 
jejet: “The Saving Health of 
God.” Church School: 9:45 A. M. 
Mather Class Forum: 9:45 A. M. 
Leader: Dr. Kirtley F. Mather. 


HELEN JOHNSON TEMPLE 

Mrs. Helen Johnson Temple, 
68. widow of Thomas F. Temple, 
former vice-president of the John 
Hancock Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, passed away on Feb- 
ruary 8th at her home 5 Wil- 
lard street, Newton. 

Mrs. Temple had been a resi- 
dent of Newton for 29 years. 
Surviving her are two daughters, 
Mrs. Edith Clark and Mrs. Ger- 
trude Schwab, a son. Thomas 
F. Temple II, and a grand- 
daughter, Jacquelyn Temple 
Schwab, all of Newton. 


CATHARINE M. CAMPBELL 

— o — 

Mrs. Catherine M. Campbell, 
died on Friday, February 8, at 
her home 439 Washington street, 
Newton. 

Mrs. Campbell was in her 93rd 
year. She was born in Ireland 
and had been a resident of New- 
ton for 75 years. 

She is survived by two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Anne Dwyer and Miss 
Sadie Campbell, both of New- 
ton, and two sons, Francis J. 
of Long Island. New York and 
Edward Campbell of Detroit, 
Michigan. 

Funeral services were held 
Tuesday morning from her heme. 
A requiem mass was celebrated 
in the Church of Our Lady by 
Rev. Daniel J. Taglino. Burial 
was in Calvary Cemetery. Wal- 
tham with prayers by Fr. Tag- 
lino. 


co Conference he was an aid to 
Commander Stassen and was ac- 
tive in the forming of the Amer- 
ican Veterans Committee having 
Mr. and Mrs. Roland E. Bell served as a member of the Plan- 
of Old Lymne, Connecticut, tor- ning Board. The service is open 
merly of Maryland announce the I to the public and the regular 
I engagement of their daughter, ' question period will be heid at 
Miss Nancy Jane Bell to Lt. ! the close of the address. 


COMMUNITY CHURCH 
OF BOSTON 

— o— NEWTON CORNER 

“What Kind of a World Does METHODIST CHURCH 
the Veteran Want?” will be the Everett L. Farnsworth, Minister 
subject of the address to be j Public worship service, Sun-, 
given by Cord Meyer Jr., at the day at 10:30 a.m. 

Community Church of Boston at Sermon subject, “The Mind of 
Jordan Hall Sunday, February Jesus.” 

17th, at 10:30 a. m. Mr. Meyer, j Church school for Bible study 

a graduate of Yale, is a veteran at 11:50 a.m. 

who saw active service as a 1 Young Adult group in the 

Lieutenant in the Marine Corps i Trowbridge room at 6:45. 

and was a machine gun battalion — o— 

leader in the battles for Guam j The Friendly Circle of the New- 

and Eniwetok Islands in the : ton Corner Methodist Church 

Pacific. He was seriously wound- will meet Tuesday afternoon, 

ed and holds the Bronze Star j February 19th at 1:30 with Mrs. 

medal. During the San Francis- Harold Clark, 315 Franklin street. 


ANNIE WEBBER 

Private funeral services were 
held at the William R. Miller 
Chapel, Waltham on Tuesday aft- 
ernoon at 2 o’clock for Mrs. An- 
nie (Heywood) Webber, widow 
of Charles H. Webber, of 17 Ox- 
ford road, Newton Centre. Rev. 
Leon S. Slmonetti, minister of 
the First Parish Church, Wal- 
tham. officiated. Burial was In 
Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Con- 
cord. 

Mrs. Webber died on Saturday, 
February 9. She was born in 
Concord, Mass., October 3, 1861, 
the daughter of Abel and Julia 
(Adams) Heywood. She had 
been a resident of Newton Cen- 
tre for many years, and was a 
member of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. 

She is survived by two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Henry L. Bleiler with 
whom she made her home, and 
Miss Velma B. Webber, both of 
Newton Centre, two grandchil- 
dren and one great grandchild. 

CARD Of" THANKS 

I wish to express my sincere 
appreciation to the business 
friends of Langley Road for the 
beautiful floral tribute which 
they sent to the service for Mrs. 
Ruth G. Oldhausen, Madame 
Ruth. 

Miss Blanche Livermore. 


read. 

All Proposals should be en- 
dorsed “Proposal for furnishing 
gasoline” and must be sealed, 
made in duplicate, one proposal 
to be deposited with the Com- 
missioner and must be accom- | 
panied by a certified check upon 
National Bank or Trust Com 


day School in Annapolis and Old- 
I fields School at Glencie, Mary- 
land. Lt. Carter expects to re- 
sume his studies at the Massa- 


pany in the Commonwealth of , chusetts Institute ot Technology 
Massachusetts for the sum of , following his discharge from the Peo P>os Society Dance. 


CENTRAL CONG. C1ICRCH 
OF NEWTON 
Newtonville 

Rev. Randolpli Seaman Merrill, 
Minister 

Mrs. Russell F. Baker, 
Director of Education 

— o — 

SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 16 
: 00 p.m. Junior High Young 


Newton and 
Brookline Social Center 

The trustees of the Allerton 
hospital in Brookline held a din- 
ner and meeting on Monday in 
the Brookline Room. 

The Western Maryland college 
held a reunion and dinner on 
Thursday in the Brookline Room. 

The Coaches of the Eastern 
Massachusetts hockey league 
held a meeting and dinner in the 
Blue Room on Thursday. 

The Knights of Columbus, 
Cardinal O’Connell Council, held 
its regular meeting on Thursday 
in the Gold Room. 

Miss Virginia Doyle of Roslin- 
dale became the bride of Mr. 
Joseph W. Wolf of Hyde Park on 
Saturday, and a wedding recep- 
tion was held In the- Gold Room. 

The grand ball room was the 
scene of a wedding reception on 
Sunday following the marriage 
of Miss Mary Byrne to Mr. Jo- 
seph Bongiorno, both of South 
Boston. 


Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) 
payable to and to become the 
property of the City of Newton 
j if the Proposal is accepted and 
the Bidder neglects or refuses 
[to comply with the terms of the 
! Proposal. 

One Proposal (without chock) i Gyoker. son of Mr. and Mrs. 
must be died by the Bidder in I Andrew Gyoker of Hammond, 


Army. 

* • * 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hurst 
of 216 Valentine street, West 
Newton, announce the engage- 
ment of their slaughter Barbara 
Louise to Captain Andrew A. 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17 
9:30 a. m. Church School — 
all departments. 

10:50 a. m. Service of Worship 
with sermon by Raymond Cal- 
kins, D. D. 

7:00 p. m. Young People’s 
Society. 

♦TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19 
8:00 p. m. Central Circle. 

A lecture on “Icebergs and 


the office of the Comptroller of Indiana, 

Accounts in Newton, prior to Miss Hurst is a graduate of 

the time set for the opening of Wheelock College with the class j Eskimos," illustrated by colored 

bids. (See Ordinance of the of 1945. She is teaching kinder- movies and slides, wifi be pre- 

City of Newton, Chapter 2, Sec- garten at Tenacre, the lower { sented by Chan Waldron. The ! Church, The First Church of 

tion 21. as amended.* school of Dana Hall in Wellesley. I public is invited to hear an ex- Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Mas- 

A sufficient Bond for the faith- Captain Gyoker attended the {citing adventure in the Arctic ) sachusetts, and in all of its 


The Triple F. of the Newton 
Corner Methodist church will 
meet at the Parsonage Tuesday 
night, February 19th, at 8 
o’clock. A White Elephant Sale 
and Costume Jewelry Sale will 
feature the entertainment. 

— o — 

Layman’s Sunday will be ob- 
served in the Newton Corner 
Methodist church at the Sunday 
morning service February 24th, 
at 10:30 a.m. Dr. Carl S. Ell, 
President of Northeastern Uni- 
versity will be the guest speaker. 
Mr. Thomas Fox is chairman of 
arrangements. Several of the 
Lay people will have a part in 
the worship program. 

o 

THE FIRST CHURCH OF 
CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

“The sun shall be no more thy 
light by day; neither for bright- 
ness shall the moon give light 
unto thee: but the Lord shall be 
unto thee an everlasting light, 
and thy God thy glory.” This 
passage from the Bible, Isaiah 
60:19, comprises the Golden Text 
to be used in the Lesson-Sermon 
which will be read in The Mother 


ful performance of the Contract University of Indiana and 
for the sum of Five Thousand ceived his degree in Metalurgl- 
Dollars ‘$5,000.00' will be re- cal Engineering from the Uni- 
quired. vorslty of Kentucky. He has done 

Delivery of material to be pur- graduate work at Harvard and 
chased is to be made at the Northeastern. He has been sta- 
Street Department Garage at tioned at the Watertown Arse- 
“110 Crafts Street, Newtonville; nal for four years where he is 
City Yard at »74 Elliot Street, control officer. 

Newton Highlands, or City Yard • * * 

at £91 Auburndale Avenue. West Mr. and Mrs. Stanley F. Wald- 
Newton. Deliveries are to be en of Greenville, Maine, formerly 
made upon orders from the of Newtonville, announce the en- 
Street Department issued from Ka gement of their daughter. 


CITY OF NEWTON 


time to time upon the seller. The 
Department’s requirements for 
the year 1946 are estimated to be 


Miss Winifred Walden to Lt. 
Charles F. Hill, USNR, son of 
. ,, nrir ^ Mr. and Mrs. Philip A. Hill of 

bMW'-n mo w and 1*».W*0 Ka* ; s. chl „ l(!0 . Illinois 



DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS 
AND MEASURES 
NOTICE 


~ Citjou^ \ 

ICOCKTAILS-DINNERJ 

^ 1 


OPEN FROM 5RU. SUNDAY IP.M. 
MUSIC BY MUZAK CS 







In compliance with the provi- 
sions of Section 41. Chapter 98 
Miss Walden was graduated j Q f the General Laws of Massa- 
from Wheaton College, Norton. ( <jhqsetts, as amended by Chapter 
Lt. Hill is a graduate of the 32i Acts of 1923, I hereby give 
Armour College of Engineering notice to all inhabitants or per 
ot the Illinois Institute of Tech sons having usual places of 
this oology. business in Newton using weigh- 

who . ing or measuring devices for the 

can show satisfactory evidence Mr. and Mrs. Joseph O. I.i ;n i , pm .p 0Se of buying or selling 
that he has the requisite ability, *•»' 1,1 03 ' l1 "" Niauon , od(| , warog merchandise, for 

experience and Flam Equipment Centre, announce Urn e, |)uh „ c w< , i(jhlng or for hh . f . 0I . 
1° complete i he Contract In full merit ol Ihc.r daughter. Mrs. ,. d br | ng guoh weigh- 
accordance with the term* there Chinrlna H Cover, to .h - - U«e , and m „ asurlng devices to he 
of. coo Ellis, USN, son of Mr. and 

Suid Commissioner reserves Mrs. L< • Cunningham ol West 
the right to reject or accept any Plains. Mo. The wedding is plan- 
proposal and to award the Con- ned for April. 


The right to increase the quanti- 
ties 50' . or to decrease them 
50' < is reserved in the City. 

Discount terms shall appear 
in the Proposal. 

It is the Intention of the said 
Commissioner to award 
Contract only to a Bidder 


n -Ho /•/, 

DEAC0NSFIELD 

7.31 HFflCON STRFCF BROOKlINF 


tract as he may deem it be--' for 
the interest of the City of New- 
ton and any Contract made will 
be made subject to appronria 
fion* and erants *o meet nnv- 
ment thereof. 

HAROLD F. YOUNG. 

Acting Street Commissioner 


region with Com. Donald Mac- branches, on Sunday, February 
Millan. 17. 

! The subject of the Lesson- 

Sermon will be “Soul," and in- 
cluded in the Bible selections is, 
"Whosoever is born of God doth 
not commit sin; for his sepd re- 
maineth in him: and he cannot 
sin, because he Is born of God” 
(I John 3:9). 

The following passage from 
the Christian Science textbook, 
"Science and Health with Key to 
the Scriptures” by Mary Baker 
Eddy, will also be Included in 
the Lesson-Sermon, “So long as 
we believe that soul can sin or 
that immortal Soul is in mortal 
body, we can never understand 
the Science of being. When hu- 
manity does understand this 
Science, it will become the law of 
Life to man, even the higher 
law of Soul, which prevails over 
material sense through harmony 
and immortality" (p. 311). 
o 

LUTHERAN CHUKKCII OF 
THE NEWTONS 
OpiHiMite the High School 
130 Walnut St., Newtonville 
Rev. Arthur II. liloek, Pastor 
Church service, 10:45 a. m.; 
Sunday School, 9:30 a. m. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

.Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 
aO persona Interested In the 
estate of 

Flleeu l'lnard 

late of Newton In said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
siid Court, praying that Kathleen 
i I art man of Saint George In the 
State of New York, he appointed ad- 
ministratrix of said estate, without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a writ- 
ten appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o’clock in the fore- 
noon on t lie fifteenth day of Febru- 
ary 1 9-1 G, the return day of this cita- 
tion. 

Witness. John C. I.eggat, Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court. this 
twenty-fifth day of January In the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

CORING P. JORDAN, 

(N) J31 - f7, 14 Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
.MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested In the 
estate of 

Elizabeth M. Wlllnrd 
late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 

The executors of the will of said 
deceased have presented to said Court 
for allowance their first account. 

If you desire to object I hereto you 
or your attorney should file u written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on the twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary, 1946, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, John C. I.eggat, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
thirtieth day of January in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
six. 

I.OKING P. JORDAN. 

IN) f 7 -14-21 Register. 


D. FLETCHER BARBER 

Funeral services for D. Flet- 
cher Barber, 90, were held Sat- 
urday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. In 
the Newton Methodist Church, 
Newton, Mass. 

Born in Antrim, N. H., August 
9, 1855, the son of the Rev. Dan- 
iel Webster Berber and Adeline 
jSarber, he came to Boston as a 
young man and entered the hard- 
ware business. From 1888 to 
1914 he was a partner in the well 
known hardware firm of Chand- 
ler and Barber, and upon the 
firm’s incorporation in 1914 be- 
came president, which position 
he held until his death. 

In 1871 he moved to Newton 
and was an Alderman in that 
city in 1902-3-4, besides having 
been president of the Newton 
YMCA in 1888-9-90. Mr. Barber 
was a past president of the Na- 
tional Hardware Association, in 
addition to having been an or- 
ganizer and director and later 
president of the New England 
Hardware Association in 1896-7* 
1910. 

Mr. Barber’s offiliations were 
many, being a member of the 
Boston Chamber of Commerce, 
Dalhousie Lodge of Masons and 
Gethsamene Commandery of 
Newtonville, Scottish Rites and 
Aleppo Temple. 

In 1888 Mr. Barber married Ar- 
tena O. Mansfield, who survives 
him as do three children, Ralph 
F. Barber of Newton, Mrs. John 
Robison of Foxboro, and Mrs. 
Ralph E. Morrison of Newton 
Highlands. There are seven 
grandchildren and two great 
grandchildren. 

WINTHROP B. HAMMOND 

— o — 

Funeral services for Winthrop 
B. Hammond of 322 Adams 
street, Newton who until his re- 
tirement 10 years ago was presi- 
dent of the Enduro Knitting 
Mills, New York, were held from 
his home on Wednesday morn- 
ing. A high mass of requiem was 
celebrated in the Church of Our 
Lady at 9 o’clock by Rev. Ber- 
nard O’Kane, pastor of St. Pious 
church, East Boston. A dele- 
gation of members of the Holy 
Name Society was led by Joseph 
Callahan, past president. Burial 
was in Mt. Calvary Cemetery, 
Boston with prayers by Fr. 
O’Kane. 

Mr. Hammond died suddenly 
at his home on Sunday, Febru- 
ary 10. He was in his 68th year 
and was born in Boston, the son 
of Winthrop and Anna (McLean) 
Hammond. During World War I 
he served as a major in the U. 
S. Army. He was a member of 
the Revolutionary and Colonial 
War Societies. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Elizabeth (Richardson) 
Hammond. 

o 

LENA M. HELGESOX 

Funeral services of Mrs. Lena 
M. (Carlson) Helgcsop, wife of 
Olaf J. Helgeson of 34 James 
street, West Newton were held 
Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock 
in the Wentworth Chapel, Wal- 
tham. Rev. George Allison But- 
ters, pastor of the Immanuel 
Methodist Church officiated. Bur- 
ial was in Mt. Feake Cemetery 
where prayers were read by Mr. 
Butters. 

Mrs. Helgeson died on Thurs, 
day, February 7. She was in her 
72nd year and was born in Swed- 
en, the daughter of Carl Peter 
and Anna i Olson) Carlson. She 
came to this country 50 years 
ago and had been a resident of 
Newton for 40 years. 

Besides her husband she is 
survived by a daughter, Mrs. 
Russell Porter Wentworth of Wal- 
tham. two sons, Carl Olaf of Bos- 
ton \ id Elmer Walter Helgeson 
of West Newton; two sisters, 
Mrs. Hannah Legerblade of Bos- 
ton and Miss Hedwig Carlson of 
Sweden, a brother, Kjalmar Carl- 
son of Waltham and four grand- 
children. 


JOSEPH E. BURKE 

Funeral services for Joseph E. 
Burke, husband of the late Eliza- 
beth Edwards Burke, of 497 
Chestnut street, Waban, were 
held Friday morning. A solemn 
requiem mass was celebrated In 
St. Philip Nerl Church at 10 
o’clock. Burial was in Evergreen 
Cemetery, Brighton. 

Mr. Burke, who for nearly 50 
years operated the Burke Thea- 
tre Agency in Boston, died at 
his home on Tuesday, February 
5 following an illness of nearly 
two years. He was in his 76th 
year and was born in Wayland. 

He is survived by two brothers, 
Paul F., of North Scituate and 
Bernard A. Burke of South Wey- 
mouth, and one sister, Mrs. Eliz- 
abeth Hanley of Brookline, 
o 

EMILY JUDSON DYER 

Miss Emily Judson Dyer pass- 
ed away on Feb. 8th. Since her 
retirement from actual educa- 
tional service in 1930, she had 
suffered a long period of failing 
health. Miss Dyer received her 
early education in the Newton 
schools and was a graduate of 
Framingham Normal School; for 
a number of years she was Prin- 
cipal's Assistant at the Bigelow 
School. Practically all her teach- 
ing was in Newton, the excep- 
tion being a short term of serv- 
ice in Cambridge. In 1914 Miss 
Dwyer was given a year’s leave 
of absence which was spent in 
European travel and in study at 
the University of Grenoble in 
Grenoble, France. 

A sister. Miss Mabel I. Dyer, 
survives. 


DEATHS 


BARRON — On Feb. 11 at Newton 
Centre, Joseph Barron, hus- 
band of Eve (Baker) Barron, 
of 111 Elgin Street. 

CAMPBELL— On Feb. 8 at New- 
ton. Catherine M. (Hession) 
Campbell, widow of Edward M. 
Campbell, of 439 Washington 
Street. 

CHENOWETH— On Feb 12 at 
Newtonville, Charles H. Cheno- 
weth, husband of Winifred M. 
Cheno wet h. of 178 Kirkstall 
Road. 

COBLEIGH— On Feb. 13 at New- 
ton Centre, Mainnie A. Cob* 
leigh of 960 Beacon Street. 

GALLAGHER— On Feb. 10 at 
Newton Highlands, Sarah A. 
Gallagher, wife of David A. 
Gallagher, of 20 Columbus 
Street. 

HAMMOND — On Feb. 10 at New- 
ton, Winthrop B. Hammond, 
husband of Elizabeth (Richard- 
son) Hammond, of 322 Adams 
Street. 

HELGESON— On Feb. 7 at Wal- 
tham, Lena M. (Carlson) Hel- 
geson, wife of Olaf J. Helgeson, 
of 34 James Street, West New- 
ton. 

PECK — On Feb. 8 at Auburndale, 
Charles E. A.. Peck, husband of 
Gertrude B. (Briggs) Peck, of 
266 Melrose Street. 

REED - On Feb. 12 at Newton, 
Robert R. Reed of 578 Centre 
Street. 

SHEPPARD- On Feb. 13 at Pine- 
hurst, N. C., Nellie M. Shep- 
pard, widow of Samuel A. 
Sheppard, formerly of Newton. 

TEMPLE— On Feb. 8 at Newton, 
Helen J. Temple, widow of 
Thomas F. Temple, of 5 Wil- 
lard Street. 

WALES — On Feb. 10 at Newton 
Lower Falls, Josephine M. 
(Richardson) Wales, widow of 
Levi Wales, of 91 Cornell Street. 

WITHERBY— On Feb. 9 at New- 
ton Centre, Edwin Thomas 
Witherby, husband of Edith H. 
Witherby, of 33 Ashton Avenue. 


COMMON W K A LT H Of 
M ASS V I II I SKTTS 

Middlesex, m-. 1‘ltnUATi-; COURT 

To all persona Interested In tin- : 
trust estate under the will of 
N unc.r Den it A ilii ms 
I ate of Newton in said County, Ue- 

• eased, for the bene/ll ot Udwttrd 1 
Mu n lev Adams and others. 

The trustee of said e-tute has pre- 
Y-oiieil to said Court for allowance 

• sixth to thirteenth accounts, In - 
; • mslve. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
, or your attorney should (lie a written I 
| appearance in said Coifl*t at Cam- 
lirldx'e before ten o’clock In the fore- 
noon on the fourth day of March 
! l!'4ti. the return day of this citation, 
i Witness, John C. I.crkuI. Ksqulre, 

! First JmlKc of said Court, this sixth 
day of February In the year one tlmu- 
i sand nine hundred and forty-six. 

I. OKING I*. JORDAN. 

(N) f!4-«l-2K Register. 


Distinctive Flower 
Arrangements for Funerals 
K. a. MAQNUSON 

Florist 

2020 Commonwealth Avenue 
Auburndale - Tel. LAS 0215 


.s^y IT 
I FIT II 


Flowers 


from 

Eastman's 

FLOWER SHOPS 

Newtonville - Wellesley Mills 
BIG. 6781 WEL. 1440 


A C RFLLINGER • V.P. MACKAY " 


Funeral Services at Rich & Bellinger are con- 
ducted in a chapel, fully equipped and cen- 
trally located. 

Rich el linger 

SUCCESSORS TO BURT M. RICH ^ 


1 K. 


14, i»t« 


Mr and Mrs. Raymond E. Gor- 
man of II Gardner street, New- 
ton. announce the engagement of 
tin ir daughter, Miss Duane E. 
Gorman to Richard C. Schlutor, 
son of Mr and Mrs. August C\ 
Schluter of 26 Whittemore load, 
Newton. 


tested, adjusted and sealed. 1 
shall be at the office of Sealer 
of Weights and Measures daily 
(Sundays and holidays excluded) 
until March 31, 1946, inclusive, 
to 8 1 ti nd to this duty. 

ANDREW PRIOR, 
Sealer of Weights and 
Measures for Newton. 
Office, City Hall. 

Office Hours, 9 to 10:30. 

February II. 21 
Ail vert i smut nl 


CATE 

Funeral Service 

Serelng This Community 
Since 1861 

Tel. BIG. 0170 

1251 Washington St. 
West Newton 


.26-30 CENTRE AVE.-NEWTON.MASS. 


MltS. GftOUGK P. Fl.OOD 

PAUl. R. FITZGERALD 

JOHN 

FLOOD 

FUNERAL 

DIRECTOR 

TtL LASrll QIM 

>41 WaablaaUa •!.. Ntwlaa 





Distinctive Service 

LOCAL ’• SUBURBAN • DISTANT 
Non-Sectarian 

Church, Home £ Chapel Funerals 
At Prices For /VII Requirements 

Information & Eslfniattf 

BOSTON • ROXBURY - BROOKLINE 




JAWateimnAns 


d 


PACE FIVE 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14. 1946 


.THE REWTOH GRAPHIC 


Rotary Club | Vets at Harvard 

Observes Scouts 36th University Urgently 


Anniversary 

The 36th Anniversary of 
Scouting was observed at the 
meeting of the Newton Rotary 
Club last Friday at the Brae 
Burn Country Club. The speak- 


Need Homes 

— o — 

Along with all the other hous- 
ing problems current today, the 
plight of the married veterans 
returning to Harvard is particu- 
larly acute. In many cases men 


er was Scout Executive Robert 1 with long overseas duty have 
E. Pctltt, a member or Newton ! becn '-educed to leaving their 

... . . , . ; wives and children at home. Some 

notary, who presented an In- , havc ^ , prced wlth( lraw 

terostlng picture of the de/nop* from the University. To combat 


Newton Club Activities 


ment of Scouting from its «tart 
on February 8, 1910 to the pre- 
sent day when it is represented 
in 74 different countries. 

Executive Petitt introduced 
the new Squadron Leader, Win- 
throp Furbush, a former naval 
ensign just returned from ser- 
vice who brought with him a 
group of young and fine look- 
ing Air Scouts. The Newton 
Rotary Club sponsored this Air 
Squadron in Newton and it has 
become the outstanding Air 
Squadron in the country. The 
Air Scouts presented an inter- 
esting program, demonstrating 
ttheir work and they brought 
along a fine exhibit. Air 3cout, 
Parker Mangeladorf, gave a wit- 
ty accounting of their activities 
during the past year. Special 
mention is due Ev. Pierce whose 
hard work to a high degree was 
responsible for the development 
of their Air Scout Troop. 

Special Scouting guests were: 
Scout Commissioner of Norum- 
bega* Council, F. Brittain Ken- 
nedy; Field Scout Executive, 
John Adams; former Squadron 
Leader, Scotty Mitchell. 

Other visitors were: Stanley 
Porter, Frederick S. Bacon, T. 
E. Kellar, Raymond Wilbur, Paul 
Pandolf, District Governor Ly- 
man Rutledge of Dedham, Scotty 
Mitchell, Norman Reed, Mrs F. 
Brittain Kennedy, Miss Adelaide 
Ball, John Adams, John Mc- 
Grath and J. Mervin Allen. 


COMMON WK A I.T1I OF 
M ASSAC II rSF.TTS 

Middlesex, .««. PKOBATK COURT 

To 

T«ols J. Orlngton 

or M« rn Illll, In the Stale of North 
Carolina. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court bv your lunband, Larry Wood- 
ruff Ovi union praying thnt u divorce 
from t lie bond of matrimony between 
himself and you be decreed for t lie 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in salt? Court at Cam- 
bridge within twenty-one days from 
•be twenty-fifth day of March 1946, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat, Require, 
First Judge of said Court, this twen- 
ty-sixth day of January in the vear 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
six. 

LORING P. JORDAN'. 
fN) J31-T7-1 4 Register. 


the problem the University has 
set up the Harvard Housing 
Bureau, under the guidance of 
Director Donald D. Hathaway 
and his capable assistants. Fur- 
ther, they were fortunate in se- 
curing the aid of Mr. Edward L. 
Francis of Hunneman & Co. as 
consulting expert. In addition, 
the University has contracted 
some prefabricated housing units 
to be installed in the summer or 
early fall. 

Despite such measures, the 
University is still faced with 
1200 veterans returning to the 
University. Those with children 
must have apartments and are 
hence in the same position as 
all returning servicemen. But 
the Bureau feels that for the 
veteran whose wife works or 
who is a student herself, the pro- 
blem is different— that the ques- 
tion is one of finding a place 
j to study and sleep and not that 
of setting up formal housekeep- 
ing. To this end they are en- 
deavoring to contact owners in 
greater Boston who might share 
or make available certain por- 
tions of their homes. Quite a 
few of the students have automo- 
biles or can make suitable com- 
muting arrangements. On the 
whole It would be a temporary 
program, yet even the housing 
units will not satisfy the de- 
mand. Nor has the University 
reached its peak in enrollment. 
Therefore, the bureau urgently 
needs and will appreciate assist- 
ance of any sort. We urge you 
to telephone Kirkland 7600 ex- 
tensions, 55, 58. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
4 MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, as. PROBATE COURT 
To all persons Interested in the 
estate of 

Mary G. I.lveriiinre 
lute of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition lias been presented to 
said Court for probate of u certain 
Instrument purporting to lie the last 
will of said deceased by Oeorge 
(•riflwold Livermore of Newton In 
said County, praying that lie be ap- 
pointed executor thereof. without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

if you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a writ- 
ten appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on i lie twenty-first day of Feb- 
ruary 1946. the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-sixth day of January In the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

T.ORTNG P. JORDAN. 

(N) j.tl - f7, 14 Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons Interested In the 
estate of 

Charles S. Nelson 

late of Newton In said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for license to sell nt pri- 
vate sale certain real estate of said 
deceased. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file si written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o’clock in the fore- 
noon on tlie twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary 1946, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat. Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
thirty-first day of January in the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LOR1NG P. JORDAN. 
(N) f"-14-2l Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons Interested in the 
estate of 

Bertram I>. Sumner 

lnte of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 

The administrators with the will 
annexed of said estate have presented 
to said Court for allowance their 
second account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the twenty-seventh day of 
February 1946, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat. Esquire, 
First Judge of snid Court, thin fourth 
day of February in the year one thou- 
sand nine hundred, and forty-six. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

(N) £7-14-21 Register. 


* 1 


A Message to Mr. and Mrs. Citizen 

From 

The Newton League of Women Voters 

ARE YOU A DESPAIRING CITIZEN? 

As you watch your government, local, state and national, 
do you ever feel powerless to influence its policies and actions? 

If you are a farmer, a trade union member, a member of 
the N.A.M. or some chamber of commerce, — in short, of any 
such organization, your voice may be heard in affairs that con- 
cern that group; but. on most matter.* you are just a member of 
the great public. Of course you elect your officials; but, after 
they are chosen, they stay in office for a term of years during 
which needs and issues may alter drastically. Your problem, 
then, is how to be heard on these constantly changing questions, 
— how to give your little push in what you hold to be the light 
direction. 

There are two ways in which you can be of some effect. 
One is to keep as well informed as possible on puhlie affairs. 
The other is to write to your representatives, local, state, and 
national. A postal will do. Your advice may not always lie 
followed, because there is always two or more sides to every- 
thing, and only one can prevail. But you will have the satis- 
faction of knowing that you did all a citizen can do between 
elections. In order that such expressed opinion may not come 
only from organized pressure groups with axes to grind — even 
good axes, Mr. anti Mrs. Ordinary-Citizen should show where 
they stand. 

It is not always easy to get unbiased and succinct informa- 
tion and most of ns haven’t time to do a lot of reading. The lit- 
erature of the League of Women Voters is one source of reliable, 
brief information ou those questions which the League, after 
careful consideration, considers most vital to the public as a whole. 
The League stands for no party and no group. It is not’itself a 
pressure group excepting in the good sense of working hard for 
what it holds to be the genuine public interest. The Newton League 
of Women Voters is eager to extend its field of service, to he jeiilo 
to give out more literature, to have more speaker* for larger meet- 
ings. to get more information to voters. For this increased ac- 
tivity they need more money. A contributions campaign is 
being run now for this purpose. Mrs. John L. MacNeil, 2o2 
Franklin street, Newton, is chairman. The League hopes that 
Newton citizens will use this source of information on public 
affairs. This is available to all people in Newton, regardless of 
party, race or erred. 


Auburndale Review 
Club 


E. Sherman Chase is scheduled 
for a paper on Eric Johnson, fol- 


Auburndale 
Woman's Club 

— o — 

The Music Group of the Au- 
burndale Woman's Club will 
have a "Guest Afternoon" 





PLAN 

II non i: YOU 

PLANT 

PLAN YOUR GARDEN ON PAPER FIRST. Consult 
your seedsman for suggestions as to better planting, 
fertilizing and general care. Also ask him about new 
or more choice varieties of seeds. Eliminate those 
grown not well liked by the family but fill in thet 
space with another choice. Increase your variety of 
foods to be selected from. 

OUR SEEDSMAN, Mr. Norman Howden, has been in 
this business for 48 years. His record is a proven 
one You can depend on his advice. 


™e CLAPPER CO 

FORMERLY NEW ENGLAND TORO CO. 

NEWTON SEED-GARDEN STORE 

1121 Wuhinf tan St., Wait Nawtan 65 - BIO. 7900 


group singing promises a very 
pleasant afternoon for music 
lovers of the Club. 

o 

Hunnewell Club 


Social Science Club 
of Newton 

— o — 

“The Mexican Cession" will be 
the subject of a paper given by 
Mrs. Samuel E. Cutler at the 
meeting of the club on Wednes- 
day at 10 a.m. Mrs. Samuel 
Braman and Mrs. Fletcher Cof 
lice will be the hostess. 

Mather Class 

— o — 

The Mather Class will meet 
on February 17, at the First 
Baptist Church at 9:45 a. m. 

Subject : Religion Today. 

Christian unity at home and 
abroad. 

o 

Newton Lions Club 

— o — 

Asa D. Blakeslee, President of 
the Club at the last meeting of 
the Newton Lions Club in intro- 
ducing the speaker of the even- 
ing, Lion Edwin House mention- 
ed that quite a few "firsts" had 
been made by Lion House. He is 
the first son of a member to 
become a member, (Bill House 
being the Poppa) the first son 
of a member to be a speaker, j on )i e ' tt at 2:30 p.m. 
the first Veteran of World War ~ 

II to become a member. The 
Lions are proud of Edwin and 
were very interested in his talk 
relating his travels as a member 
! of the U. S. Marine Corps, and, 
j incidentally of the many engage- 
i ments in the South Pacific area 
in which he took part. Ed men- 
tioned that as near as he could 
figure, in his travels he covered 
I 3200 miles by air, 18,700 by ship, 

1 12,800 miles by rail, and twice 
as many on foot. Before being 
honorably discharged from the 
Service Edwin was used as a 
human guinea pig for the treat- 
| ment or malaria, being a volun- 
| teer. 

i During the meeting Lion Tam- 
j er Jack Tapper had his double 
quartette lead the members in a 
: few songs which are being re- 
i hearsed in anticipation of a spec- 
, ial meeting to be held in honor 
1 of Sea Scout Ship 13. sponsored 
j by the Club. At this meeting the 
[ speaker will be "Dolph" Sambor- 
ski, Director of Intramural Ath- 
! let ics at Harvard and among 
• guests expected to be present 
1 are Sea Scout Commodore Man 
M. Maclntire and Commissioner 
J F. Brittain Kennedy of Norum- 
bega Council. 

o 

Homecrafters Club 

— o — 

i The Newton Homecrafters club 
will meet on Monday evening, 

February 18, at 7:30, at the home 
of Eugene E. Little of 19 Crofton 
road, Waban. A demonstration 
I of hand tools as used in bench 
I work will be given by Albert 
| Dulac. . 

Newton W.C.T.U. 

I — o — 

1 The Woman’s Christian Tem- 
perance Union of Newton will 
meet Friday, Feb. 15, at 711 
! Boylston street, Boston, at the 
Home Craft Demonstration Shop 
on 5th floor. 

A luncheon will be served and 
talks will be given by active of- 
ficers of the State W.C.T.U. in 
the morning and afternoon. The 
program will start at 10:30 a.m. 
and last until 3:45 p.m. Mrs. 

Sarah Stevens, president will at- 
tend also Mrs. Robert Keene, 

Miss Evangeline Morse and Mrs. 

Isaac Goddard. A door prize will 
be awarded. This is generally 
groceries, as 'it is a demonstra 
tion luncheon. 


On Tuesday morning. Feb. 19 
at ten o'clock, the Review Club Contrasts.” 
of Auburndale will hold its reg- 
ular meeting. Hostess for the 
occasion being Mrs. C. H. Bier- 
man of 1843 Commonwealth av- 
enue. Mrs. N. McDonald of La- 
sell Junior College is chairman 


Newtonville 
Woman's Club 

— o — 

Mr. J. David Townsend, lect- 
urer and traveler, will address 
the Newtonville Woman’s Club, 
at the meeting to be held on 
Tuesday, February 19th, at 2:30 
p. m. After twenty-nine years 
spent in France and Algeria. Mr. 
Townsend has recently returned 
to America. A close student of 
political happenings and region- 
al customs, he has watched 
European events take shape and 
head up inexorably In the pre- 
sent crisis. With his family of 
four young children he fled from 
Paris only two days before the 
! German troops entered that city. 
Swept into the endless stream 
of refugees, he was an eyewit- 
ness of many heart-breaking in- 
cidents. The subject of Mr. 
Townsend’s address Is. "The 
French Political Set-Up as seen 
through the eyes of a Woman of 
the Street.” 

Miss Estelle G. Marsh, club 
president, will conduct the meet- 
ing. A group of songs will be 
sung by Mrs. Kenneth A. Ber- 
nard, with Mrs. Harold G. Oster- 
land, accompanist. Pourers at 
the tea will he, Mrs. Harry B. 
Green. Mrs. Everett H. Judkins, 
and Mrs. William R. Mattson. 

Community Service 
Club* 

— o — 

On Wednesday, Feb. 20 the 
Community Service Club of West 
Newton will hold its monthly 
meeting at the Unitarian church. 
West Newton, at two o’clock. 
This will be a joint meeting of 
the Newton Federation Clubs. 

Mr. Arthur Moulton will pre- 
sent an illustrated lecture in col- 
ors of "Quaint Quebec, the Land 


Newtonville Garden 
Club 


The Newtonville Garden Club 
will meet on Thursday, Febru- 


for the day and will read a paper ary 28. 1946 at 10 a.m. at the 
on Care of Our Anti-Social. Mrs. home of Mrs. W. B. Hanna. 40 
Fair Oaks avenue, Newtonville. 


Mrs. F. W. Harding will speak 


lowed by a book review to bo ? n J°y° l,s Art of Garden- 

given by Mrs. R. O. Walter. The ing 
book is "The World of Washing- 
ton Irving” written by Van Wyck 
Brooks. 


Newton Garden Club 


Mid-Year Meeting of 
Newton Federation 
Of Women's Clubs 

— o 

"Quaint Quebec" an Illustrat- 
ed lecture by A ...ir Moulton, 
will be enjoyed wh'-n the Nr-wton 
Federation of Women’s Clubs 
mid year meeting is held. Wed 
nesday, Feb. 20, in the parish 
house, Unitarian church. West 
Newton. 

During the meeting, which will 
begin at 2:00 p.m., Miss Adelaide 
B. Ball, president, will announce 
the completed plans for the New- 
ton School of Public Affairs meet- 
ing, which will take place on 
March 25. 

The Federation is to be the 
guest of the Community Service 
Club of West Newton, and fol- 
lowing a short meeting, the pre*- 
ident, Mrs C. M. Glazier, will 
greet the guests and turn the aft- 
ernoon over to the Federation. 

Tea will be served by the Host 
ess Club following the program. 

Former Navy Men 
May Rejoin at Same 
Rank Within 90 Days 

Lt. Comdr. John F. Sargent. 
Officer in Charge of Navy re- 
cruiting in the eastern Massachu 
setts district, today announced 
that men with previous Navy 
service who desire to re-enlist in 
the regular Navy with the same 
rating which they held at the 
time of their separation from the 
service must do so within ninety 
days from the date of their dis- 
charge. Previous regulations al- 
lowed men a full three months 
to re-enlist with the same rating. 

Previous-service men wishing 
to re-enlist in the Navy, or to ob- 
tain information, should visit the 
Boston Navy recruiting station 
in the Post Office building. Post 
Office Square. 

Newton Tree Library 

During the weeks Feb. IS 
Mar. 2 and Mar. 4-16. there will 
be exhibitions of water colours 
at the Main Library by two sis- 
ters. Miss Mary M. O’Gara and 
Mrs. Alice Caron, respectively, 
of 77 Brookside avenue. Newton 
ville. 

Miss O’Gara studied at the 
summer school of the University 
of Alberta. Banff, Canada, and at 
present is a teacher of art in 
the Boston schools. Her .sub- 
jects are the Canadian Rockies. 

Mrs. Caron is a teacher in the 
Henry Whittemore School in Wal- 
tham. Five of her pictures are 
of Maine and others are Rock- 
port and locality. 


The Colonial Farmhouse 





PICTT'RF. AND TF.XT FROM BOOK OF HOMES 
pj' .ithe-l by The Co-operative Bank* of M«*(4cau»ett* 



r 

1 

11) |_ 

□ 



Ui'iLUt 

00 


By taking extra pains with the 
prup< and fenestration of the 
tufade, it is possible to avoi 1 a 
"boxy" appearance in the »ma!i 2- I 
story Colonial House. The perfect 1 
proportion of the oid houses was 
d ie largely to the fact that they 
were set close to the ground, tl.e 
vory heights were quite lo*.v and 
the 'pace between floors was kept 
to the minimum. The modern 
. f 

•;.e ground and story height are 
somewhat higher. To obtain th» 


41CO»0 DlAN 

effect of the old low house, how- 
ever, it i* only nece'jary to carry 
the cave line about eighteen ir. hris 
below the second-story ceiling, as 
was done w ;th the hou^e shown 
It is such thine- a* this that make 
the difference between a really 
good house and an ordinary one. 
It has a large lh Ing-rcx m. dining- 
room. kitchen with breakfast nook, 
and Lvatory on the first floor, and 
t1i*»e 1 edro'jrr.s. dre - ng r om'and 
ba*h on the second. There i- 
ample c!o«?t space. 


^Miller Oil Co 

,4200/ (E s T - 7 a 2 si \4200y 
69 RIVER ST. -WALTHAM. MASS. 


FUEL OILS 



Monday, February 18, at the Woman’s^ Club 
home of Mrs. Clarence H. Bier- 
man, 1845 Commonwealth av- 


"Color through Flawers” will 
be subject of a colorful lecture 
and demonstration by Mrs. 
Henry M. Kistner of Glendale. 
Long Island, at a meeting of the 
Newton Centre Garden Club at 
10 o’clock on Tuesday, Febru- 
ary 19th, at the Newton Centre 
House. Mrs. 


George I. Engle, President of 
j the club, will preside at the 
| meeting which will be preceded 
Following a short business *?>’ a social halt hour with cof 
meeting there will be the story f ee - Tickets for 'the Spring Flow- 
ot' Carmen with recordings, giv- ei Show on March 18 to 23 in- 
on bv Mrs. Daroagh L. Higgins. elusive. at Mechanics Building. 
The Musical Bulletin and a dis- B ° ston - ™ay be purchased at 
cussion of musical events with th ! s mcetin 8 at the Garden Club 


price of 95c. tax included 
Mrs. William H. Perry, the 
Club’s busy and efficient Pro- 
gram Chairman, who is respon- 
sible for the interesting pro- 
grams this year is assisted by 
Mrs. Austin C. Benton, Mrs. 
Open House will be held at Louis E. Phaneuf, Mrs. J. Warren 
the Hunnewell club. 84 Eldredge Gerrity. Mrs. Frederick C. Ris 
street, Newton, on Sunday, Fob- * n K- Mrs. William H. Lothrop. 
ruary 17. from 2:30 to 6 p.m. and Mrs. Clifford P. Smith. 

There will be an exhibition of COMMONWEALTH Of 

Hooked Rugs, also Antique Trays >t \>vw in sV r rs 

and Furniture restored by the Mi .p x ' \. J’ |; < >B.vr >* uourt 

pupils of Mrs. Ralph L. Angier est.it* 
and original designed sweaters . . '*• Tll " m P ,0U 

by Mrs. Belle Parker. 

Members and friends are in- 
vited. Tea will be served. 


d«- 


CO.\l MON WEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. PKOHATR COURT 

To nil persons IntcreMed In Hi.- 
est.ite of 

Lillian F. Quinlan 

late of Newton In sulil County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition hus been presented to 
saiit Court for probate of a certain 
Instrument purporting to be the last 
will nf said deceased by Richard A 
Crain of Melrose in said Countv. 
praying thnt he he appointed admln- 
latrator with tin* will annexed of 
•said estate, without ghlug a >uret.\ 
on his bond. 

If vou desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a writ ten 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o’clock In l tie fore- 
noon on the elKhteenth day of Feb- 
ruary 1946, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, John C. I.rKgai, Enquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this twen- 
ty-fourth day of January in tin- year 
>iid nine hundred and forty - 


late of Newt.. n .n said 
ceased 

A petition haa been presented to ' 
said Coui 

Instrument put -pm ting to be tlie la--: 
will of —».i deceased by Harold 
-Miller of M . e.-ii-i . : l.n* Uoumv of 
W V\ 

Newton in said Cou ol M ddleaex 
praying that they be appointed ex- 
ecutors thereof, without giving a 
surety on their bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court Cam- 
bridge before ten o'ch . k m tl.e f :e- 
noon on the twenty-fifth u.y of Feb- 
ruary 1916. Hie return day •>: tins 
citation. 

Witness. John C. I.i-gg.. : Require. 
First Judge of said iVtu:, Mrs 
thirtieth day of January . the year 
one thousand nine hundred and f.*r.\- 


six. 

<N) j:il-f7-14 


I-ORING P. JORDAN, 
Kegist 


COMMONWHAI.TH OF 
M \HNACHU8KTTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROHATK COURT 
all persons interested in the 


(N> f 7-1 4-21 


LURING P. 


JOCPAN 


ale i 


I'mlrrlilll. 

Hilld ('>>1111(4 


Will In in l> 

lata of Newton I 
ceased. 

A petition lias been presented to 
said Court for probate of u certain 
instrument purporting to tie the last ; N 
will of said deceased l>\ Boston Suf.- decease. 
Deposit and Trust Cumpan. nt Hos- decieed. 
ton In the County of Suffolk and i estate . 
Margaret Underhill of Newton mi said to ■• in 
County of Middlesex, pray Inn that uated 
the v lie appointed executors tlieieof. Sullolk 
without gulug a surety on their to tin 
homla. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a writ- 
ten appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the tore- 
noon on the eighteenth dm of Febru- 
ary 1946. din return day of this clta- 
tlon 

Witness, John C. I.eggii. Ksqulre. 

First Judge >>f said Court, this 
twenty-third day of .lanu.ii' In the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LOlllNQ P. JORDAN. 

4N) 111 - 11, lt Register. 


COM110NlVHtl.nl OF 
M Vss \i III M | | s 

Middlesex, ss. I’KUUAT K COURT 
To Stephen John Boylan, Donald II 
Hoy la n, Alan M. Royl.m Richard C. 
H>>y Ian and Barry M Boylan m.n.it*. 
B n Sulllt 

tiell Sullivan, Katherine A liuvlan. 
4’arol Boy I. hi BlrtueU and D.x.d 
Hlrtwell. ail of Newton. In >.■ ,1 
Comity, and Maiv lb>\lan. t >f vial 
Newton. Individually, and a- she is 
adminlstr iti lx of the estate of 
Meplit-ii J. liny lain 
late of said Newton, deceased. 

A petit Ian ha> been presented to 
said Court li> Daniel J. Boylan, 
praying that .■ specific perform.! no- 
of .111 agreement for the conveyance 
of u u interest In real estate entered 
into by Stephi a J. Boy lan late of 
'aid I’oiinty of Middlesex, 
t said petitioner may be 
the administrator of the , 
. 4 id deceased lie ordered | 
1 propert 


\\ . 


If you ties! 


td p. 


the 


limy 


,’UIVllt. 


fit agre 

o objev t thereto you 
should file a written 
ilil Court at t'aiii- 
o'clock m the foie, 
it (fifth day of Feb- 
return day of 


appearance in 
bridge before h 
noon on the tw 
ruary 1946, tin 
citation and also file an aliswei or 
Other legal pb'.nlMg within twenty 
one days thereafter 

Witness. Job., *' L.k.m C-pim.. 
First Judge of said Court tills 
I ■ 

t Ileus. i ini nine bundled gnd fortv six 

LURING 1*. JORDAN 

4N) fl-14 Hi ItogUisr 


TIRE RATIONING ENDS 


No more certificate^] Once again every 
one is eligible to buy. and »ooa you'll 


be able to drive in and get immediate 
delivery on new tires for your car. 


PRODUCTION OUTLOOK AT 
A GLANCE 


lira manufactuiara hare been unable to fill the great 
need ior new passenger car tires. In case we do not 
have the ngbt sise tire lor your car. we should be able 
to get it soon. Come in for full information. 


HERE’S WHY yoi’ll wait the 
R. F. Goed rich Silvortowa 

OUTWEARS 

PREWAR 

TIRES! 


H Hat been proved. More thsn 2.000 tesu sod 
nearly 1 ’.000.000 miles of the toughest kind of 
road service showed that this new B. F. Goodrich 
Silverrowa will Ourwenr Prewar n stunt l rubber 
Tires. 

New, better rubber. B F. Goodrich hat de- 
veloped a rubber that’s far better than ordinary 
synthetics. It helps the new Silvertown wear better 
and run cooler. It has greater resistance to cracking 
— and actually standi bruising and damage trocn 
accidents better. 

Tire body 35% stronger. An entirely new. 
stronger cord is used, more of these cords are u»ed 
in the top pl>, an extra »hock-ab»orbiug breaker strip 



is included. The result: a bodv that is 35^6 stronger 
for additional resistance to bruises, extra blowout 
protection. 

Flatter tread covers more ground. Called 
the "road level ' tread, it puts more rubber on the 
road, perm.es all the tread to share the wear. Result: 
s further increase in mileage, less scuffing, better 
distribution of weight better traction, more safety 
oc the turns. 

Plus 3 years' EXTRA experience. Three yea. 
before acv other manufacturer. B. F. Goodrich sol- 
tires containing synthetic rubber to American cj 
owners. l[he extra know-how piled up in these vears 
is reffecttfcl in the new B. F. Goodrich Silvertown. 


EXTRA MILEAGE TIRE RECAPPING 

6.00-16 . . . $7.00 

WE LOAN YOU TIRES WHILE YOURS ARE 
BEING RECAPPED 

Service Charge — $1.00 each 

B RAM’S 

Battery and Tire Service 

252 Walnut Street -:- Newtonville 

Call LASell 0835 

Hmt CoUtcf rvtry TbuntLty on ABC mt 9:30 p‘ ES.T. 


B.EGoodrich 

TIRES 






PAGE SIX 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 14. 1946 


Valentine Collection at 
Newton Centre Library 

— 0 — 

An interesting collection of old 
valentines is being shown at the 
Newton Centre Branch Library 
during February. The exhibit is 
loaned by Miss Laura Levesque 
of Newton Centre. 


”Y" Tankmen Split With 
Cambridge ”Y” Teams 

The Newton YM.C.A. Junior 
and Midget swimming teams 
met the Cambridge “Y” teams 
at the Cambridge Pool last Fri- 
day night, in dual meets, the 
Newton Midgets winning by a 
score of 24 to 15. and the Cam- 
bridge Juniors winning by a 
score of 33 to 24. Results of the 
various events were as follows: 
Midgets. 20 yd. free style. Pit- 
chello (Ci 1st: Amendola (N) 
2nd: Stafford Huss iNi 3rd. 
Time 10.5s. 20 Yd. breast roke. 

William Gray (N> 1st: Scaly 
(C) 2nd: Henry <Ci 3rd. Time 
14.8s. 20 Yd. backstroke. Don- 

ret t vC * 1st: Whelan (N i 2nd: 
Emberrcy < C » 3rd. Time 14.4s. 
BO Yd. medley relay won by 
Newton (Whelan. Gray. Amen- 
dola. Time 41.2s. SO Yd. free 
style relay won by Newton 
(Huss. Charles Lynch. Maloney. 
Amendola'. Time 52.3s. 

Juniors. 40 yd. free style. 
Martes (C) 1st: Foley (C) 2nd: 
Louis Visco (N> 3rd. Time 
22.4s. 40 Yd. breaststroke. Wil- 
liam Altieri (N) 1st: Robert 
Johnston (N't 2nd: Bruno Visco 
(N> 3rd. Time 26.3s. 100 Yd. | 
free style. John Millard (N* 1st: 
Jovellis (C> 2nd; Henry ( C > 3rd. 
Time lm. 8.1s. Fancy diving. 
McGowan (Ci 1st: Doucett (C> 
2nd: Altieri (N) 3rd. 120 Yd. 
medley relay won by Newton 
(Fogelgren. Altieri. L. Visco t. 
Time lm. 17.3s. 160 Yd. medley 
free style relay won by Cam- 
bridge (Young. McGowan. Foley. 
Martes'. Time lm. 32.1s. 


CITY OF NEWTON 
City Clerk’s Office 

NOTICE OF BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN HEARING 
March 4, 1946 

Notice is hereby given that 
the Board of Aldermen will hold 
public hearing at City Hall, on 
Monday. March 4. 1946, at 8:00 
o’clock P. M. upon the following 
petition under the provisions of 
the General Laws and Revised 
Ordinances of the City, viz: 
£87955. Fisher Plastic Corpora- 
tion. for permit to install an 
underground tank at 49 Elm- 
wood St.. Ward 7; and to keep, 
store and use Fuel Oil in con- 
nection therewith, maximum 
quantity to be stored at one 
time. 10.000 gallons, for Private 
Use Only. 

FRANK M. GRANT. 

City Clerk. 

.Ad vertlsc m«*nt 
February 14. 1946 


Metropolitan Opera 
At Boston April 4 
To April 13 

— o — 

The Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany of New York will again 
come to Boston ror Its annual 
spring visit. The Boston Opera 
Association announces that 
twelve performances will be giv- 
en by the Metropolitan at the 
Boston Opera House beginning 
April 4th and continuing through 
April 13th. with matinees on 

The company will bring the 
Wednesday and Saturday, 
new Swedish tenor. Torsten Ralf. 
who will be heard on opening 
night in Tannhauser. In the 
same cast the celebrated con- 
tralto Blanche Thebom makes 
her first appearance in Boston 
and the performance will be con- 
ducted by the Metropolitan’s 
new Wagnerian Conductor. 
Fritz Busch. Other new singers 
will be hear during the season. 

Mail orders will be accepted 
after February 16th at the of- 
fice of the Boston Opera Associ- 
ation at 420 Boylston street. Bos- 
ton. and Mrs. Anita Davis- 
Chase. Promotion Manager, urg- 
es that no cash be sent in mail- 
orders as it positively will not 
be accepted. 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
M VSSA4 III M i ls 

Middli:>-x. PRO BATH COURT 

To all persons Interested In the 
estate of 

t nthcrlm- A. Costello 

late of Newton In said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
Instrument purporting to be (lie last 
will of said deceased by Mary 
Costello . .f Newton in said County, 
praying tli.it she be appointed execu- 
trix thereof, without giving a surety 
on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should hie a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in tlu* fore- 
noon on the fourth day of March 1916. 
tli»- return day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggnt, Kaqulre, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
8< centh daj of February In the year 
on. thousand nine hundred and forty- 

LORING P JORDAN. 

( N l f 14-21*2$ , Register. 


Pick Flowers from This 
List for Peace Garden 


THE COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 

Petition to Foreclose Tax Lien 

(Seal ' No. 27860 

To All Whom It May Concern, 
and to Any persons interested in 
the George M. Briggs Construc- 
tion Company, formerly having 
a place of business in Newton, 
in the County of Middlesex and 
said Commonwealth, who have 
not released their interest in the 
land hereinafter described: 
George M. Briggs, formerly of 
said Newton, deceased, and Mary 
E. Briggs, residence unknown, 
or their heirs, devisees or legal 
representatives. 

Whereas, a petition has been 
presented to said Court by thq 
City of Newton, a municipal cor- 
poration, located in the County 
of Middlesex and said Common- 
wealth. to foreclose all rights of 
redemption from the tax lien 
proceedings described in said pe- 
tition in and concerning a cer- 
tain parcel of land situate in said 
City of Newton in the County 
of Middlesex and in said Com- 
monwealth. bounded and de- 
scribed in said petition as fol- 
lows : 

About 148 square feet of land 
on Clark terrace, being more 
particularly described in Section 
25. Block 3, Lot 2 of Assessors’ 
Plans. 

If you desire to make any ob- 
jection or defense to said peti- 
tion you or your attorney must 
file a written appearance and an 
answer, under oath, setting forth 
clearly and specifically your ob- 
jections or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 
the Recorder of said Court in 
Boston fat the Court House i, on 
or before the eleventh day of 
March next. 

Unless your appearance is 
filed by or for you. your default 
will be recorded, the said peti- 
tion will be taken as confessed 
and you will be forever barred 
from contesting said petition or 
any decree entered thereon. 

And in addition to the usual 
service of this notice as required 
by law, it is ordered that the 
foregoing citation he published 
forthwith once each week for 
three successive weeks in the 
Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published In said Newton. 

Witness, John E. Fenton. Es- 
quire, Judge of said Court, this 
fifth day of February in the year 
nineteen hundred and forty-six. 
Attest with seal of said Court. 

Robert E. French, 

Recorder. 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Esq., 

75 Federal Street 
Boston, Mass, 
for the Petitioner 
im tii-n ii 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
M \NSA< iiim: I IS 

M i'lillc-fc'-x. «s. PROBATE COURT 

To nil persons interested in the 
estate of 

Henry dt Montlgn.v 

late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. . , . 

A petition lias been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said dereased by Rnsalida dc 
Montigny of Newt -n In said County, 
pra vine tint -be be npp»lnted execu- 
trix thereof, without giving a surety 
bond 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or v.lur attorney sh -uld file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before t-n o'clock In the fore- 
n-.'.ii on the fifth day of March 1J46, 
tin- return day of thi- « nation. 

Witness. John <’. -b-gg at. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this tw-ntn 
dav of February In the >- ar one thou- 
sand nine hundred and forty-six. 

LURING U. JUUDAN. 

(N) H4-21-2S Register. 


— O — 

Garden planning is best done 
in the winter when the gardener 
has most time for It. Here is a 
list of flowers, classified accord- 
ing to type, color and habits, 
which may be a valuable aid in 
planning a garden on paper. 

For edges and borders Sweet 
alyssum. dwarf nasturtiums, lo- 
belia. dwarf marigold, ageratum. 
Virginia stocks, forget-me-nots. 

Long stems for cutting- Ast- 
ers, calliopsis, mourning bride or 
scabiosa. cosmos, giant zinnias, 
and double gaillardias. 

Short stems for cutting— Marl 
golds, snapdragons, calendulas, 
sweet peas, annual chrysanthe- 
mums, bachelor buttons, carna- 
tions. lilliput zinnias, annual 
pinks, sweet sultans, salpiglos- 
sis. 

For color masses — Petunia, 
zinnia, marigolds, calendulas, an- 
nual phlox, verbena, stock, aster, 
salvia and poppies. 

For light or poor soil — Nastur 
tiums. Clarkia. godetia. poppy, 
portulaca and zinnias. 

For fragrance — Mignonette, 
heliotrope, nasturtiums, alyssum. 
ten weeks’ stock and sweet peas. 

For shady places — Pansies, 
torenias or wishbone plant, god- 
etia. forget-me-not. nemophila 
and varieties of mimulus. 

For hot situations— Sunflow- 
ers. heliotrope, portulaca. ice 
plant, petunias, balsam and an- 
nual gaillardia. 

Vines— Morning glories, moon- 
flowers. Japanese hop. climbing 
nasturtium, cardinal climbers, 
cobaea, cypress vine, balloon 



17/ . 

ANNUAL 

TINK>3. 

OIANTHU5 


vine, scarlet runner and hyacinth 
beans. 

For a fragrant, all-season bord- 
er. with material for cutting, you 
may include most of the follow- 
ing: Ten weeks’ stocks, petunias, 
French and African marigolds, 
calendulas, annual larkspurs, 
cosmos, zinnias, sweet peas, por- 
tulaca, kochia, flowering tobac- 
cos. calliopsis. annual phlox, ag- 
eratum, sweet alyssum. poppies, 
asters, balsams, bachelor’s but- 
tons, sweet sultan, coxcomb and 
annual pinks. 

If you have any questions 
about flowers, or gardening. Mr. 
Howden of Clapper Co., 1121 
Washington street, West New- 
ton, will bo glad to answer them. 


CITY OF NEWTON 
Massachusetts 


NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

Sealed Proposals for furnish- 
ing the 1946 requirements of the 
Newton Water Department for 
gasoline of the grade termed 
"Regular”, as furnished to your 
filling stations, will be received 
at the office of the Water Com- 
missioner, City Hall, Newton 
Centre. Massachusetts, until 11 
A.M. Thursday, Feb. 21, 1946. 
at which time and place they 
will be publicly opened and read. 

All Proposals should be en- 
dorsed "Proposal for furnish- ; 
ing gasoline" and must be sealed, 
made in duplicate, one proposal 
to be deposited with the Com- 
missioner and must be accom- 
panied by a certified check upon 
a National Bank or Trust Com- , 
pany in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts for the sum of 
Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00' 
payable to and to become the 
property of th^ City of Newton I 
if the Proposal is accepted and 
the Bidder neglects or refuses 
to comply with the terms of the 
Proposal. 

One Proposal (without check • 

1 must be filed by the Bidder in the 
! office of the Comptroller of Ac- 
counts in Newton, prior to the 
time set for the opening oi bids. 
(See Ordinance of the City of 
Newton, Chapter 2. Section 21, ! 
as amended.) 

A sufficient Bond for the faith- 
ful performance of the Contract 
I for the sum of Twenty- live 
l hundred dollars ( $2.500.00 1 will 
be required. 

Delivery of material to be 
purchased is to be made at the 
Water Department Supply Yard, 
=G75 Watertown St., or at the 
i Needham St. pumping station. 
z318 Needham St. Deliveries are 
to be made upon orders from 
! the Water Department issued 
from time to time upon the , 
seller. The Department's re- 
quirements for the year 1946 
are estimated to be between 
22,000 and 25.000 gals. The right 
to increase the quantities 50 N 
or to decrease them 50': is re- 
served in the City. 

Discount terms shall appear 
in the Proposal. 

It is the intention of the said 
Commissioner to award this 
Contract only to a Bidder who 
tan show satisfactory evidence 
that he has the requisite ability, 
experience and Plant Equip- 
ment to complete the Contract 
in full accordance with the terms 
j thereof. 

Said Commissioner reserves 
the right to reject or accept any 
Proposal and to award the Con- 
tract* as he may deem it best 
for the interest of the City of 
Newton and any Contract made 
will he made subject to appro- 
priations and grants to meet 
payment thereof 

JOSEPH J MURRAY, 
Water Commissioner 

V«l\ rru n nirnt 

February 14. 19(6 


THE COMMONWEAI TH OF 
MASSAC IIUSETTS 
LAND COURT 

Petition to Foreclose Tax Lien 

(Seal i No. 27739 

To All Whom It May Concern, 
and to John N. Hodge and Mrs. 
John N. Hodge, now or formerly 
of Newton in the County of Mid 
dlesex and said Commonwealth, 
or their heirs, devisees or legal 
representatives. 

Whereas, a petition has been 
presented to said Court by the 
City of Newton, a municipal cor 
poration, located in the County 
of Middlesex and said Common- 
wealth. to foreclose all rights of 
redemption from the tax lien 
proceedings described in said pe- 
tition in and concerning a cer- 
tain parcel of land situate in said 
City of Newton in the County of 
Middlesex and in said Common 
wealth, bounded and described 
in said petition as follows: 

About 590 square feet of land 
on Tudor Terrace, being more 
particularly described in Section 
40. Block 4A. Lot 22A of As- 
sessors’ Plans. 

If you desire to make any ob- 
jection or defense to said peti 
tion you or your attorney must 
file a written appearance and an 
answer, under oath, setting forth 
clearly and specifically your ob- 
jections or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 
the Recorder of said Court in 
Boston (at the Court House), on 
or before the eleventh day of 
March next. 

Unless your appearance is 
filed by or for you. your default 
will be recorded, the said peti- 
tion will be taken as confessed 
and you will be forever barred 
from contesting said petition or 
any decree entered thereon. 

And in addition to the usual 
service of this notice as required 
by law. it is ordered that the 
foregoing citation be published 
forthwith once each week for 
three successive weeks in the 
Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in said Newton. 

Witness, John E. Fenton. Es- 
quire. Judge of said Court, this 
fifth day of February in the year 
nineteen hundred and forty-six. 

Attest with seal of said Court. 

Robert E. French. 

Recorder. 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Esq., 

75 Federal Street 
Boston, Mass, 
for the Petitioner 

<S> f 1 4-21-2S 

COMMON W E W.TH OF 
M V.NN \( III »| T IS 

Miq.ll.-v.-x. PROBATE COURT 

II piM-sonn Intonated in the 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
M \SSACII I - SETTS 

Middlesex, vs. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the 
estate <>f 

Jemima M. McKenzie 
■ '!>■■> known as Jemima Maxwell Me- 
K- nzie late of Newton in said County, 
deceased. 

A petition has been presented In 
said Court, praying that Joseph 
ri.-rr.. Bellh.-nu of Cambridge in said 
Comity, public administrator, be ap- 
pointed administrator of said estate. 

if you desire to object thereto you 
• i your attorney should file a written 
app.-ira in-.- in said Court at Cum- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- j 
noon on the twenty-fifth dav of Fell- ! 
niarv 1946, the return day of this j 

Witness. John C. Loggnt. Esquire. 1 
Fust Judge of said Court, this 
thirtieth d-i\ of January in the >e.r 
one thousand nine hundred and fortv- j 
six. 

CORING P. JORDAN. 

(N) f.-14-ll Register. • 


"The Toieh Beaters" 

3-Act Comedy at Newton 
Centre Woman's Clubhouse 

— O — 

On Friday evening, March 1, 
at 8:30, Mrs. F. Earle Conn and 
file dramatic committee of the 
Newton Centre Woman's Club 
will present a three-act comedy, 
"The Torch- Bearers.” at the Club- 
house. 

The play Is directed by Maude 
G. Higgins, and the east, in or- 
der of appearance. Includes: Jen- 
ny. Muriel Grayson; Mr. Ritter, 
Joseph Williams: Mrs. Ritter, 
Rita Toebcs; Mrs. ^ampinclli, 
Charlotte Troutyine; Mr. Spind- 
ler, Dean Waite; Mrs. Fell, Bun- 
ny Keller: Mrs. Hossefrosse, Hen- 
ry Harmon: Teddy Spearing, 
James Gibson; Miss McCrlckott, 
Ruth Golden: Mr. Twiller, Harry 
Troutwine; Mr. Stage Manager, 
James Swisher; Mrs. Sheppard, 
Eleanor Cochrane. 

Mrs. Edward R. Broad is in 
charge of hand properties; Mrs. 
Warren H. Preble, Mrs. Ferdi- 
nand J. Blake, and Mrs. Carl B. 

Dahlin. stage properties: Mrs. 
James Mitchell, make-up; Mr. F. 
Earle Conn. Mr. Carl B. Bohlin, 
and Mr. Robert Cochrane, stage: 
Mrs. Virgil Casten, refreshments; 
Mrs. Henry Ido. tickets; and Mrs. 
Norman Appleyard, program. 

At the initial sale of tickets the 
following reservations were 
made: Messrs, and Mesdamcs 
Norman Appleyard, Fred Mor- 
gan, Carl Bohlin, John Timm, 
Walter I. Muldoon, Victor Vaugh- 
an, John W. Gahan, James Mit- 
chell. S. Hardy Mitchell, John 
Capron, Parker H. Kennedy, Gus 
Breitzkc, Lloyd Clark, Thomas 
M. Nee. Joseph Salsbury, Wil- 
lard Rice. Frank J. Linehan, Har- 
ry M. Sutton, Harry C. Trout- 
wine, Harry Crocker, Edward R. 
Broad, N. Arnold McCoy. Ralph 


G. Hudson, George H. Crosbie, 
Arthur W. Rayner, Otis E. Steph- 
enson, Wendell R. K. Mick, Wal- 
ter D. Stewart, Arthur J. Lucler, 
Lee A. Ellis, Charles A. Thomp- 
son, Willis E. Pattison; Mes- 
dames J. H. L. Hill, Leonard Row- 
ley, H. Thaxter Spencer, Clark 
Drummond. Joseph Briggs, Hen- 
ry Ide; and Miss Elizabeth Arm- 
lngton. 

On February 21. Thursday 
morning, at toif o’clock, Mrs. 
Frank Mansfield Taylor will pre- 
sent the fifth in her series of 
talks on "Current Events," at 
the Newton Centre Woman’s 
Clubhouse. Mrs. Harry Clark 
Barber, program chairman, is in 
charge of the meeting. 

New Concern in Newton 

— o — 

The newly incorporated Rob- 
erts’ Engineering Company has 
opened offices at 67 Union street, 
Newton Centre. The Company 
designs, remodels and equips 
stores, offices. lounges, kitchens, 
and besement rooms in homes. 
Mr. R. W. Taylor, president of 
the Company, a Newton resi- 
dent. says that while all mater- 
ials are not plentiful most are 
now obtainable and he expects 
the availability to improve even 
further in the near future. He 
states, moreover that the pent- 
up demand, occasioned by the 
war time restrictions on build- 
ing and renovating, cannot bo 
satisfied quickly even when mat- 
erials are again plentiful. 


Pasteboard cartons and wood- 
en boxes are not the things to 
put ashes in. Now that metal 
products are coming back, be 
sure that you use only metal 
containers for ashes. 



Hill: Snv, dear, what have I clone to deserve tuo eggs on my 
plate this morning? 

Jane: I thought I'd surprise you with that extra one. It’s 
been a long time since you’ve sat down to something as rare as 
that, hasn’t it? 

Hill: I'll say it has. But what’s the idea anyway? It isn't 
my birthday, so . . . 

Jane: Well, I know how very fond of eggs you are, and since 
all fresh ones have suddenly hit a new low in price and are no 
longer a luxury item on our budget, I decided to give you a treat. 

Bill: That certainly is good news; it’s not very often that 
you hear a food price has dropped. Now that you mention it 
though, I do remember overhearing a conversation on the subject 
of eggs on the bus vsterday. But I was so busy rending my news- 
paper that the words didn’t make much of an impression. 

Jane: Yes. I imagine that there's more than one young hus- 
band who is getting an added supply of protein and iron this 
morning and who is just as pleased about it as you arc. You can 
expect more eggs in our meals from now on because they are 
such a good buy during this season. 

NEWTON NUTRITION CENTER, 

1357 Washington Street, West Newton. BIG. 4911 

Citizens are welcome to come in for food and budget informa- 
tion on Wednesdays from 10 to 12 a.m. 


Comdr. Buse- 

(Continued from Page 1) 

struction of Concrete Floating 
Drydocks at Wilmington, North 
Carolina. During the past year 
he has been Logistics Engineer 
for the Scabecs, on the staff of 


Commander Service Force, Paci- 
fic Fleet, with headquarters at 
Pearl Harbor. Mr. Buse is re- 
turning to the practice of law 
with offices at 10 High street, 
Boston. 


A lot of people who have no di- 
rection themselves want to direct 
others. 


of 


■isc.,1, 


\ihln-w ll, MhcKviuIp 
of N*-wt<iii in t-nl<l County, di*- 


\ |p* linn lia.H liecn printed to 

. d •■.nit. prayinK (lint Mary M. 
Lord of Newton in mild Count v. •»»- 
app'>intfil ndmlniMratilx of naid •>- 
(:<(< without giving a surety Oil h»-r 
bond. 

If you deal re to object thereto yni 
or vnur attorney should 111*; •* wriiton 
appVtnini-o In said Court ;«i Cam- 
bridge before ten o‘< I. • l< in the for... 
noon on the twenty-fifth dav of Fr-li- 
runry 1916, the return day of thU 
citation. 

Vi • ■ rohi c i.< 

First Judge .d anil ‘»ur. Hi 
thirty-first day of January in tin- \< ar 
one thousand nine hundred and f« rt\- 
six. ' 


CITY OF NEWTON 

Notice is hereby given that 
the Board of Aldermen will hold 
a public hearing at City Hall, 
on Monday, March 4, 1946, upon 
the petition of Francis J. Hewitt 
to change the present route of 
busses of the Middlesex & Bos- 
ton Street Railway Co., from 
Elliot, High, Summer ami Chest- 
nut Streets, to Elliot, Oak and 
Chestnut Streets, Ward 5, 

Attest 

FRANK M. GRANT. 

City Clerk. 

Vlwo (itf'int- ir 

[Febiuary 14, 1346 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 
Case No. 9353, Misc. 

(Seal) In Equity 

To Louise M. Goodwin, of 
Bristol, in the State of Con- 
necticut: any other persons 
interested in the estate of 
George W. Macgregor, for- 
merly of Newton, in the 
County of Middlesex and 
said Comonwealth, deceased, 
who have not released their 
interest in the land herein- 
after mentioned: 

GREETING: 
Whereas, a suit in equity has 
been begun in our Land Court 
by Samuel Lippcn, of said New- 
ton, representing that he is the 
owner of a certain parcel of land 
situate in said Newton on Chan 
ning Street, and that said prem- 
ises were made subject to a 
moi-tgage given by Samuel Lip- 
pcn to George W. Macgregor 
dated November 8, 1926, re- 

corded with the South Registry 
District of Middlesex County in 
Book 5039, Page 559, which has 
been paid but never discharged, 
and praying that said mortgage 
be declared to be a cloud on his 
title: 

WE COMMAND YOU. if you 
intend to make any defense, that 
on the first Monday of April 
next, which Monday is the re- 
turn day of this subpoena, or 
within such further time as the 
law allows, you do cause your 
written appearance to be entered 
and your written answer or 
other lawful pleading to be filed 
in the office of the Recorder of 
said Court at Boston, in the 
Coflnty of Suffolk and said Com- 
monwealth. and further that you 
defend against said suit accord- , 
ing to law, if you intend to make 
any defense, and that you do 
and receive what the court shall 
order, adjudge and decree there- 
in. 

Hereof fail not. at your peril, 
as otherwise said suit may be 
adjudged, and orders and de- 
crees entered therein, in your 
absence. 

And it appearing to the Court 
upon the suggestion of the 
plaintiff that there may be other 
persons interested in the estate 
of George W. Macgregor whose 
names and residences are un- 
known and they cannot actually 
be served with process, it is 
ORDERED that the plaintiff give 
further notice of this suit by 
publishing a true and attested 
copy of this order in the New- 
ton Graphic, a newspaper pub 
fished in said Newton, once a 
week for three successive weeks, 
tiie last publication to he one 
month at least before the first 
Monday in April next. 

Witness, JOHN E. FENTON, 
Esquire, Judge of our Land 
Court, the twenty-eighth day oi 
January, in the year of our Lord 
nineteen hundred and forty-six. 

Robert E. French, 

Recorder. 

A true copy, 

Attest: 

Robert E. French, 

IN) J31-I7-11 Recorder. 


A MESSAGE OF INTEREST 
TO BOSTON EDISON CUSTOMERS 


At a time when prices of most commodities 
are showing an UPWARD trend 

Boston Edison Company, announces 

(Effective, March 1, 1946) 

a DOWNWARD revision of electrical rqtes 

for 395,000 residential and commercial customers 



It is always good news to receive word of a re- 
duction in the price of an essential commodity. 
During a period in which commodity prices show 
a general upward curve and the cost of doing 
business is increasing, it is noteworthy when an 
organization announces, lower 
prices for the product it sells. 

Such an organization is Boston 
Edison Company. On and after 
March 1, 1946, Boston Edison 
residential and commercial cus- 
tomers will benefit from the new 
rate schedules which have been 
filed with the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Utilities. 

The total number of customers 
affected is approximately 395,000 
and the aggregate yearly saving 
to them will be $1,200,000. 


SUMMARY 
of New Reduced Rates 

1. First step of residential and 
small commercial rates re- 
duced from 6J-4 to 6 cents. 

2. "Area” feature in residential 
rate entirely eliminated. 


3. Rates affecting large com- 
mercial customers modified 
and reduced to promote mod- 
ern installations for both 
light and power. 


In making these rate reductions, the Company 
is giving its customers immediate benefits of lower 
Federal taxes, but at a time when all other operat- 
ing expenses such as fuel, payrolls and materials 
are rising. This action further demonstrates Boston 
Edison’s confidence in the future 
of Boston apd the 39 cities and 
towns directly served by our lines. 
It should encourage a broadened 
use of electricity as a household 
servant and the hand-maid of 
commerce. 

It is true today . . . and begin- 
ning March first it will be more 
than ever true . . . that 


BOSTON 


EDISON 


"Electricity does more and 
costs less than any other 
item in the family 
budget." 


COMPANY 




PAGE SEVEN 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 14. 1946 


REAL ESTATE 


REAL ESTATE 


HELP WANTED 


T HE NEWTON GRAPHIC_ 

HELP WANTED | WANTED 


WANTED 


HOUSES 

WAITED 


CASH CUSTOMERS WAITING! 
List Your Property with • 
REALTOR 

HOWE ASSOCIATES 

ROB Cojnmonwealth Avenue. Newton Centro 

Call BIO. 6500 


MORTGAGE SERVICE 

If you are about to buy, build, or possibly refinance your present 
mortgage, consult a firm with a background of over 100 years 
of dependable service. Interest rates as low as 4%. Construction • 
permanent loans arranged, one title examination for both. Re- 
gardless of what type of mortgage you wish to arrnnge, be sure 
to consult us first. No commission charged. Prompt attention 
assured. Mortgage loan correspondents for 

PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

REALTOR8 

1207 Beacon 8treet, Brookline 46 - - - ASPlnwall 1604 


YOUNG MAN 
20-30 Years Old 

TO LEARN GROCERY BUSINESS 
Full Time 
APPLY MANAGER 

27 Lincoln Street* Newton Highlands 

• ( formerly Hood’s Creamery) 


HIGHEST AMOUNT of 

CASH 

FOR YOUR 

CAR 

WRITE, PHONE or DRIVE IN 

Merit Any Hr pairing? Expert Meehnnirt A rail fifth 

MYRAN MOTORS, Inc. 

75 NO. BEACON ST, WATERTOWN 


WAT 7000 


Ward Maids - Floor-Kitchen Women 
Laundry Workers 

FULL OR PART TIME 

ArPI.V BETWEEN 9:10-11:00 A. M. PERSONNEL OFFICE 

Newton- Wellesley Hospital — Newton Lower Falls 


SPECIAL NOTICE TO BUILDERS 


FOR SALE 


M. J. Odence 


LOT OF LAND LOCATED AT 
10 CHARLES STREET (Rear) 

Auburndale — from 1M to YYi acres. Very 
desirable. 

132 BROAD ST., BOSTON 
TELEPHONE HANeork 3968 


Residence — 77 Beaumont Ave., Newtonville-BIG. 7210 


For . . . 

NEWTON 
REAL ESTATE 

. . . See 

Paul Harris Drake 

626 Commonwealth Ave. 
NEWTON CENTRE 

DECatur 1020 


For Real Estate Serviet 

NEWTON ESTATES 

BIGelow 1280 

Spe.cialiiti in Heal Estate 


At iJrluton $tgf)lanbtf I 

Beside quiet roadway, comfortable resi- 
dence. midst wide-flung boughs. lawns 
and gardens, tf rooms, a baths, oil. 
Possible Individual apartment. 2-car 
barn-garage. Price SII.IOO. 

Call Exclusive Agent, Bigelow BOtlO 
Days) i -VU It (Nlghta). 


FOR SALE 


FOR SALE 


It Storm Windows, each 

Folding Screen ftt.lllh 

Spool Bed SlO.flll 

Wing Chair I3.V0H 

llargains in Furniture 

SEELEY BROS. CO. 

757 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTONVILLE 
t Tel. — BIGelow 7441 




Alvord Bros., Realtors ^ 
Newton Centre, Musa. 


FURNISHED ROOMS 


FOR RENT 

Furnished Heated Rooms 
at Woodland Golf Club 

Call LASeil 1900 


NEWTON: Pleasant furnished 
room on bathroom floor. Con- 
venient to cars. Call mornings 
or evenings, BIG. 2102. f!4-tf 


FOR RF T: Two unfurnished 
rooms with bath that may be 
used as combination living room 
and bedroom, and* kitchenette 
and dinette. In West Newton. 
Two business adults only. Ad- 
dress E. A. B., Graphic Office. 

fl4z 

LOST AND FOUND 
LOST SAVINGS BANK BOOKS 

Harlngi Hunks Hooks ns listed h*li»w j 
are lost and ninillrutlon hns been mn le 
for payment* of the uceounts In ac- 
cordance vtIIIi Sec. 40 Ch«|i AM of the 
Acts of 190R and amendments. 

Newton-Waltlmm Bunk and Trust 
Co. No. C- 13671 

Newton-Waltlmm Bank and Trust 
Co., No. C-14535 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
92862 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
29684 

Newton Centre Savings Bank 
Book No. 27707 

West Newton Savings Bank Book 
No. 27274 

Newton Savings Bank Book 
No. 92693. 

Newton-Waltham Bank A Trust 
Co. No. 3387. 

Newton- Walt Itain Bank A Trust 
Co. No. H 4593. 

West Newton Savings Bank 
Book No. 19336. 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
84936. 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
88172 

Newton Suvings Bank Book No. 
90119 

Atibunulule Co-operative .Matured 
Share Certificate No. 1668 
Newton National Bank Book No. 
1033 

Newton Co-operative Rnnk Book 
No. 15341 

LIBERAL REWARD for re- 
turn of black and tan German 
Shepherd. Cuts on forepaws, tan 
between ears, wearing choke 
chain, name "Barry". Last seen 
vicinity of Newton Upper Falls, 
(.’all owner, NEW. 2104-M and 
use utmost caution when hand- 
ling. f 1-1-21 z 

LOST: Lady's gold wrist wateh 
with 6 diamond chips, between 
Ransom ltd. and Commonwealth 
Ave.- Cent re St. bus stop. New- 
ton Centre. Reward. Tel. DEC. 
0144 evenings. f!4 


FIREPLACE WOOD, o.k, well 
seasoned. Any length. Will de- 
liver during next two months. .1. 
C. Walker, WAYland 118, ring 3. 

nl-tf 

FURNITURE FOR SALE 

UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY 

9- pc. brown mahogany dining 
, room set, 4-pcs. Walnut bedroom 
furniture, also other small pcs.. 

- including 9x12 Sahara rug. All 
| in excellent condition. Cal) BIG- 
elow 5386. f7-tf 

FOR SALE: Well established 
j beauty salon in Wellesley. Ad- 
j dress LB, Graphic Office. f7 

FOR SALE — NO DEALERS. 

In excellent condition. Antique 
Flax Wheel, $20. Also hand hair 
dryfer, $10. Tel. Big. 8790. f7-2tz 

FOR SALE: Moving picture 
camera, Cine Kodak, model GO. 
i 1-9 lens. 8 mm. Price $55. Phone 
; BIG. 2856. fl4z 

FOR SALE: Dennis, Cape Cod, 

| vicinity Cape Playhouse, short 
distance from Nobscussett Beach. 
6-room cottage and garage, sur- 
, rounded by trees; sitting room 
with fireplace; tile bath on sec 
i ond floor; shower with closet on 
first. Comfortably furnished at ; 
$6500. Phone BRAintree 0284. 

f 14- 1 f 

ALASKAN SEAL COAT, size 
12 or 14. Good condition. Not 
out of style. $200. Call LAS. ' 
4084 between 6 and 9 p.m. fl4z j 

FOR SALE: Pair of Misses' rid- 
ing boots, size G’l»; excellent pro-; 
war leather. Originally from 
London Harness She - ^nly worn 
twice. Tel. LASeil .<1 fit 


RAPID 

EXPANSION 

Necessitates 

OUR 

NEED FOR 

MORE 

GIRLS 

to Make 

3ADI0 TUBES 

45-HOUR WEEK 

Experience 
Not Necessary 

GOOD PAY 
During Training Period 

Employee’s Cafeteria 

Openings at 
Both 

NEWTON 

and 

WALTHAM 

PLANTS 

Apply at 

\ F. WTON E M PI.OY ME NT 


55 Chapel St. 
NEWTON 


WANTED 

Young man or girl, 18-25, for 
clerk in Soda and Cigar de- 
partment of Newton’s busiest 
drug store. 

Steady position, pleasant work, 
good pay. 

Apply in Person 

HUBBARD DRUB CO. 

125 CENTRE ST. NEWTON 


200 CARS 
WANTED 

TOP PRICES PAID 

If in storage or in need 
of repairs, wn may buy if.. 

Call LONgwood 1790 

Evenings LASeil 0829 


WANTED 

Clerk-Typist 

FULL TIME 

Apply 9:10 to II A. M. Personnel OfTIci 

Newton- Wellesley Hospital 

NEWTON LOWER FALLS 



Insurance Executive 

Presrtit resident of Westchester County. 
N V desire* to rent i»n unfurnished 
house for fiimlly of four. Family ap- 
preciates nice thing* and will take 
■,-ood care of house and grounds. Phone 
HANcock 8500. Ext, 680 


WANTED: Infant from birth 
or older child in private homo; 
no other borders. Tel. NATick 
1579. fl4z 

WANTED in Wellesley Hills, a 
cleaning woman regularly. 4 to 
6 days a week. A block and a 
third from bus line. Call WEL- 
lesley 0413. fl4-3t 

WOMAN to assist with light 
l housework in clean, modern 
home, 3 or 4 mornings a week 
from 9 until 1 or 2 p.m. or 2 full 
days 9 until 5 p.m. LAS. 5649 
f 14z 


WANTED: Young woman for 
office work, 5'z days a week. 
Experience not necessary. 
Wright - Foster, Inc., 780 Beacon 
St.. Newton Centre. Call DEC. 

0880. f 1 1 

PERMANENT full time posi- 
tion for young woman in gift 
and yarn shop. Waban Gift and 
Yarn Shop, 1631 Beacon St., Wa- 
ban. fl4-2t 


MISCELLANEOUS 


Ll.NOLEUM f{ CM N ANTS - 
Suitable for small bathrooms and 
counter tops. Also large stock 
Armstrong asphalt tile, inlaid and 
Battleship linoleum, and metal 
edging. Call Johnson, STA. 6560 
25 Market St., Brighton. o5-tf 


WORK WANTED 


COLLEGE STUDENT wants 
part time work. Has driving li- 
fl4z 


FOR SALE: Circassian walnut 
double bed, spring, mattress, bu- 
reau, mirror, chair, ping-pong 
table. $75. Call BIG. 9101. fl4z 

SPRING CLEANING? Is your 
home becoming cluttered? Are 
you short of storage space? 1 
will buy your odds and ends at 
the current high dollar. Call 
LAS. 0750. K. Mullen. fl4-2t 


FOR 'SALE: Metal ice box, 50 
lbs. capacity. Call BIGelow 8662. 

f!4z 


cense. Tel. LAS. 4021. 


TWO INSULATED gas stoves, 
left ovens; washing machine, ro- 
tating drum type. Tel. LASeil 
0487 mornings. fl4z 


ANTIQUES WANTED 



SELL YOUR 

BOOS <S 

TO HALL ■ BIGelow 2888 

Eighteen leiin in Mieuttus 


APARTMENTS WANTED 

(ILIET, ELDERLY COUPLE, 

without children or pets. Best 
references; require 2 or 3-room 
apartment on first or second 
floor in residential district by 
April 1. Tel evenings, BIG. 3677. 

j31-4tz ! 

EX-NAVAL FLYER and wife, 
anxious to rent unfurnished 
apartment or small house. Both 
college graduates. Good back- 
ground. No children. Permanent 
residence. Please call Lasell 
0343. f7-2tz : 

WANTED: Apartment of 2 or 
3 rooms, furnished or unfurnish- 
ed by veteran and wife. Former 
Newton residents. Tel. Lasell 
8295. f72tz 

VETERAN, wife and child 
would like to rent 4 or 5-room 
apartment, Newton or Wellesley. 
Phono LASeil 3480. tll-2tz 

WANTED: Small single house 
or apartment. Call LAS. 5146 or 
write Mrs. 15. L. Drowne, 32 
Lakewood Kd . Newton High- 
lands. fltz 

APARTMENT WANTED. $50 
reward. 1 need an apartment 
with one or two bedrooms for 
three working adults on or be- 
fore April 1., Call after 5:30 
p.m., LASeil 2751. fU 


ROOM WANTED 

WANTED: 2 or 3 rooms with 
kitchen privileges. Two American 
middle-aged people. Call between 
5 and 6 p.m. Las. 5395. f7-2tz 

WANTED: Near Newton Corn- 
er, light housekeeping room or 
lurpished room. Willing to help 
with heater and other chores 
Call Ed, Doe at BIG. 5620. fl-tz 


WANTED: Woman to do part 
time general work or cleaning, 
1 or 2 days a week, in Chestnut 
Hill, near bus and railroad sta- 
tion. Call AspinwaU 3677 be- 
tween 8 and 10 a.m. f\4-z 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 

Petition to Foreclose Tax Lien 

(Seal) No. 28277 

To All Whom It May t Concern, 
and to Marian H. McDermott, 
now or formerly of Boston in the 
County of Suffolk and said Com- 
monwealth, or her heirs devisees 
or legal representatives; Wil- 
liam W. Cherney of said Boston. 

Whereas, a petition has been 
presented to said Court by Max 
Uliti and Harriet T. Ulin of Bos- 
ton in the County of Suffolk and 
said Commonwealth, to foreclose 
all rights of redemption from 
the tax lien proceedings de- 
scribed in said petition in and 
concerning a certain parcel of 
land situate in Newton in the 
County of Middlesex and in said 
Commonwealth, bounded and de- 
scribed in said petition as fol- 
lows : 

About 1968 square feet of 
land on Ferncrol't P.oad, being 
more particularly described in 
Section 57, Block 12, Lot (4> 
DB of Assessors' Plans. 

If you desire to make any ob- 
jection or defense to said peti- 
tion you or your attorney must 
file a written appearance ami an 
answer, under oath, setting forth 
clearly and specifically your ob- 
jections or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 
th. Recorder of said Court in 
Boston (at the Court House), on 
or before the eighteenth day of 
February next. 

Unless your appearance Is 
tiled by or for you, your default 
will be recorded, the said peti- 
tion will be taken as confessed 
and you will be forever barred 
from contesting said petition or 
any decree entered thereon. 

And in addition to the usual 
service of this notice as required 
by law, it Is ordered that the 
foregoing citation be published 
forthwith once each week for 
three successive weeks in the 
Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in said Newton. 

Witness, John K Fenton, Es- 
quire, Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-third day of January In 
the year nineteen hundred and 
forty-six. 

Attest with *al of said Court. 

ROBKi.T E. FRENCH, 
Recorder. 

Max Ulin 
U Beacon Street 
Pro se 

Jan. 31, Feb. 7. 14 


REM a Singer Sewing ma 
chine for us long as desired. In- 
quire about our special rates 
Classes in dressmaking, home dec- 
orations, children’s clothes and 
make-over now forming; morning 
afternoon and evening classes. 
Singer Sewing Machine Co.. 424 
Moody St. Waltham. Tel. WAL 
I 3331. d2tf 1 

RADIO REPAIRS at low prices, 
Newton Music Store. LAS. 0610. 

! s27tf 

HAVE YOUR Sewing Mac tune 
serviced by our bonded service 
men in your own home. All parts 
and work guaranteed. Singer 
Sewing Machine Co.. 424 Moody 
St.. Waltham. Tel. WAL. 3331. 

d2tf 

DRY scrap lumber 1 load $7.50, 
sawed for fireplace, $12.50. bag 
wood 25c a bag or 5 for $1 taken 
Also a few cords of dry cord wood 
Marshall C. Spring Co.. Inc., 15 
River St., Newton Lower Falls 
WEL. 3100 «81-8tz 

F. A. B. RANGE BURNER 
SERVICE: Burners Serviced' and 
I Vacuum cleaned. Prompt Serv- 
1 ice. Call Dec. 1494. f7-4t 


>ii 


f.t 


Julia S. I. ester 

lit - ..f Pi-yvi.l.-iK-t- in the Slat* . 
ittloit,- thill tUl lUu'e.lfeil. leaving ri*t.. 
in -.ml • ’••util > I.f Middlesex 

A jietuii'ii lu»> bei-ii ITe-tMited 
■ • : i - ■: that Davit) 

luninolly of ('rauxtoti in the State > 
Uli'iilo Island he .ippu.n'r.i »<i > 
i ra t . . r of said eslai**. witliou'. ■: 
u surety on ids bond. 

If > . -ii desire to objivt '• 

or your .uionn-y should rt’.a « a 
.. pp. ar.uu in said «*ourt at * ' i > J 
bridge before ten o'clock in the t><> 
noon . >11 llu* four til da* of Mar, 
1 !!|>; till- return dav of ihi* vi'.i'. 

Witness. John <\ l.egg.it K- ■ 
l-'Irst Judge »t said I’ourt. till* e;g' 
day of February in the tlu> 

sand nlin- hundred and fom -. \ 

I. OKING IV lOltPW 
<N> f 14*21-2$ Uevl-t- 

NOTICE OF CHANGE OF 
CORPORATE NAME 


We. Marguerite Hastings, 
President, and Gertrude O’Brien, 
a Director of The Alumnae of 
the Newton Hospital School of 
Nursing Inc., a corporation or- 
ganized under the laws of Mass- 
achusetts. located in the city ot' 
Newton, county of Middlesex, 
hereby give notice that a peti- 
tion executed according to law, 
requesting that the name of the 
corporation be changed to Alum 
nae of the Newton Wellesley Hos 
pital School of Nursing. Inc was 
submitted to and approved by 
the Commissioner of Corpora- 
tions and Taxation January 14. 
1916. and deposited in the office 
of the Secretary of the Common 
wealth, pursuant to the pro- 
visions ot section 11 of chapter 
180 of the General Laws iTet 
Ed.), as amended. 

Marguerite Hastings, 

President 

Gertrude O’Brien. 

Director 

A4v< 


W-A-N-T-E-D 

Old Furniture. Chink. Brlc-a-ltrae 
Hlihrit Prtees Paid 

HITCHCOCK HOUSE 

1161 Washington 61 .. - - Wed Newton 
Call n 61 i ham 1120-M 


HOUSEHOLD SERVICES 


P. E. COWAN 

Carpenter Roofer 

Contractor 

• PAINTING 

* REMODELING 
• MODERNIZING 

• REPAIRIN'.- 

181 Parker St.. Newton (Jenin- 
Tel. BIGelow 5357 


IRSIAN RUGS ARE woven with fechnico' G > and gemus 
for color ond devgn r>ch with allusion. The best examples ire 
never the obvious but conceol within themselves the infinite 
riches that ore revealed only to the sympathetic. 

And when you purchov* o GREGORIAN RUG, you ar# buy- 
ing o rug that embodies oil the traditional traits of this fosci- 
notmg textile o f t. Treat yourself to one of our rugs, and feel 
o’.sured of 'creos'ng enjoyment both n your generation ord >n 


lur children’s. 

A FEW EXAMPLES 


10.4 x18.2 

KAZVIN 

. SI 475. 00 

10.4 xl 7 6 

TABRIZ 

1150.00 

9.10x15 

TABRIZ 

750.00 

8 9 xl 2 

KIRMAN 

825.00 

9 xl 2.2 

KIRMAN 

775.00 

8 3 xl 0.3 

SAROUK 

575.00 

9 x12.3 

SAROUK 

650.00 

12 6 x17 8 

BACHTIARI 

1800.00 

10 xl 9 

HINDUSTAN 

750.00 

4 10x10.4 

SHIRAZ 

275.00 

4.6 x 6 

KESHAN 

100 00 

8 xl 0.5 

AFGHAN 

375.00 


— AND MANY OTHERS — 

A Gregorian Hug toilay it an heirloom tomorrow 

Arthur T. Gregorian 

230€ Washington Street — Newton Lower Falls 
Telephone BICalow 2553 

(Opposite Grove. Street) 


Tel. STS. Ill* All Work Guaranteed 

Conrad A. Tjernstrom’ 

Interior and Exterior Painting 
Paperhanging. Kalsomining 
19 Montfern Ave. Brighton 


PAINTING-PAPER HANGING 
also Ceilings 
FLOORS RL FINISHED 

EXCELLENT WORK 
ESTIMATES GIVEN 

W. REYNOLDS 

BIGelow •Til 


PAINTING - PAPERHANGING 

INSIDE and OUTSIDE 

Ceilings Whitened , — Floors Re-Finished 

SPENDABLE, EXPERT WORKMANSHIP 

estimates, samples submitted 

o Obligation 

SEYMOUR SILVER 

16 Arlington Road West Newton 

Telephone LASeil 0496' 

ESTABLISHED 22 1 E VK5 tN THE NEWTONS 


jON TJ,, Interior 

l tj". ~i ir» Decorating 

of All Kind* 

N\VJ Painting 

'*V7f' w ‘1 I I’APrrh.incInf 

I < I I Ceillnc* Kal*o- 
\ I II f mined 

\v FI"or» Krfimsded 

Li Ftpertlv Done 

Prompt Serrlee 

HAROLD P. JOHNSON 

23 Year* in Itrlnu.nt 

Call BELmont 3667 


JOSEPH RICHARD | 

FLOOR SAXSING - 
and REFiNlSHING ’ 

Call WALtham 2821 -W 


Complete Exterminating 
Service 

TERMITES. ANTS. INSECTS 
AND RODENTS 

JOS. E. LaGASSE CO. 

KEN. 2181 or BIG. 3123 


PAINTING 

PAPERHANGING 


INSIDE and 
OUTSIDE 


Ceilings Whitened 
Floors Sanded and 
Refinlshed 




WALLPAPER REMOVED 
by ELECTRIC MACHINE 


Firtl C.lati I Fork 
Reatenrthie Prices 



mu t. O’DEA 

400 California St.. NewtonviHe - BIG. 9661 


Painting & Decorating 
Paperhanging 
E. J. ELLARD 


10 Bradford Rd tVa:. r 


tV AT. T1T9 


Where to BUY IT, RENT IT, SELL IT, 
or HAVE IT REPAIRED 


THE SERVICE CO. 
HERB SWANSON 

H.*» M W VI l ROAD 
!<■ Year*' Experience 
Commer.-ial - Domestif 

REFRIGEh. TION SERVICE 

ANY MAKE 

WAItham 540S-R 


NEEDHAM FLOOR SERVICE 

Specialists In 

REFINISHING FLOORS 

w%*iiirn - WAxrn - poliahid 

Alto office and store floors 
A i ! Mectrrr E.: : . n-.-at l :ed 

For Prompt -ena e - « all NEE S1K 
WINDOWS CLEANED 


UPHOLSTERING 
Mattresses Made To Order 
inner Spring Mattresses 

T. B. HAFFEY CO. 

Cor W nbirulon St. and Centre A»r 
r*L Bltielow IOMI Established IM» 

Newloo 


R. A. Vachon & Sons, Inc. 
REPAIR WORK 
Promptly Attended To 
Contractors and Builders 
22 Union St.. Newton Centre 
Tel. DKCatur 0072 


Antiques 

Painting 



HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

for antiques, sileer. bric-a-brac 
china. [Ills, piciuies tnd furniture 

Call da* or night 

’ M. M AULTS. BIG. OS-13 

859 VV ILMT «TBEET 
NEVVTOSVII 1 E— or 

1ST* Commonweallh V*e . Brighton 

Be* eon OGOO 

PAINTING & DECORATING 

by 

Deagle & Aucoin 

BIG. 075S — LAS. 4S39 

Ap pliances 

Painting - Paperhanging 

Inside A Out Floors & Ceiling* 

JOSEPH WRIGHT 

U Bl RNDALE 

Shop DECatur 1308 

Res BIGelow 5S05 

76 CRESCENT STREET 


MILLS RADIO & ELECTRIC 

If it't Fleet rival ire'll fix it' 
ORDl K YOl K NEW 
.t.VDIO - WASHER UE'FRIGFRArOR 
— N O VV • - 

J8:» Walnut St.. Xewtonvllle-l VSell 
>»he.-t Mual< - l U*»l« » IB d P-puiar 
Records 

Printing 


Electrical Appliances 

Flodin Sewing Machine Co. 

Tel. BIG. 3204 

liegitler .V>mt for Earl y Delivery 
257 Walnut St. . NewtonviHe 


JAMES F. HUGHES 

Commercial and S«el«ir Prtaiiaa 
established IS Tears 

MS RHUNtl STRUT 
XRWrONVIIX* 

BIGelow 1414 


Garpenters 


Piano Tu tiers 


Electrician and Steamfitter | 

Wiring for Itsht heat and i>»»er Heat < 
lag »*sieiii» insulted -'"d w ■ . 

Iiliaure repair* Prompt * >' >e No Jot. { 
loo small Krasoiui’le prit-e*. 

II It SVVFIXIV 

111 ftargrnl siren Newton 3.' ( 

telephone MIC. I ll 


HERBERT L. RAY 

CARPENTER 

Kepairs promptly alleadrd U 

70 Walker St., NewtonviHe 
BIG. 8343 


PIANOS WANTED 

COMPLETE PIANO SERVICE 

LOUIS V HAFFERMEHL 
Newtoa Centre 

I'el. Bigelow 1501 -Bigelow 1967 


Furiiilurt* \\ autecl 


EARL'S 

RANGE BURNER SERVICE 

Autn- Puis.- Pum-.o nhul: iu.hp • : • '• 

ms oil 

SOLD and INSTALLED 

NEW and I Mil) IV l KS| II* I OK >. VI I 

Call EARL WALLACE. Prop. 
LASeil 6345 

129 Grasmere St - Newton 


WILL BUY 

M.mle l op I multure. PalBtlnss. 
I'., ,i,rcs. traiurs. Odd and Ends. 
Iiilite Contents ol Howes 
Honied Reference. 

Richard Gray 

ll » OVKPVll III) NEW ION 1SI) 
tail 01 Cotur Ui3U Amllma 


PIANO n XING 


J. \V. r.VPPEK 


LAS.ll 1306— BlUelos 014, 


Puintr-. * 


Roofers 


IVbii.ii j 1|, 21, IM4 


Seelev Bros. Co. 

msrixciiv t 1 1*1101 iVrEKixu 

Window >h.id.s 

Main rss 'takers Viilmiars Restored 
Phone BIGelow '.III • 1st. Ithll 
IIIA Ws-hmiion »t Nrwlantillp 


FLOORS SANDED 

sill | I vt Ki ll Mini POI ISIlFl) 

l.ulett Fquipment 

F. E. O DEA - BIG. 9661 

100 l.iliforuia Si., Ntfwluiiville 


\Y. »\ I K AVITT SONS CX). 

Any typ« of ROOFING 
in»t3llr«l or rep»ir«4 
29 PEARL 8T, NEWTON 
DECitur 0778 
New tun e Oldest Roofcci 










PAGE EIGHT 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


Ask Pensions 
Be Increased for 
City Employees 

o — 

At a mooting of Newton Local 
17ft. City Employees Union held 
Iasi Thursday evening in Colum- 
bus Hall, Newton, it was voted 
to send three representatives to 
a hearing to be held Feb. 12 at 
10:30 a.m. at the State House. 
Boston on House Bill 470 which 
provides that pensions be in- 
creased from one-half to two- 
thirds of the annual pay. Mem- 
bers who will attend the hearing 
are President John D. Russo. 
Vice-President Thomas J. Moran 
and Legislative Agent A. Leslie 
Moriarty. 

It was also voted to write con- 
gressmen and senator’s urging 
passage of House Bill 2330, which 
provides for the exemption of the 
first $2,000 for income tax pur- 



with economical OIL BURNERS 
quality FUEL OIL 
expert BURNER SERVICE* 

* Find out more about this I 


Call 


COM. 3400 
LAS. 0328 


PETROLEUM 
HEAT & POWER COMPANY 

419 Boylston St.. Boston 


poses.- of all annuities and pen- 
sions. received by retired Fed- 
i oral. State and Municipal cm- 
! ployees. It was pointed out that 
| under the Railroad Retirement 
Act. $1,300 is exempt and under 
the Social Security Act. $1,200 is 
exempt from Federal taxation. • 

It was resolved that: "Pen- 
sioned employees of State. Cities 
and Towns should receive the 
same consideration as others re- 
ceiving benefits under the ex- 
emption laws.” 

— o 

Halliday Resumes 
Lew Practice 

— o— 

William E. Halliday. Jr., of 
Newtonville has resumed his 
practice of law at 13ft7 Washing- ( 
ton street. West Newton. 

Mr. Halliday entered the ser- 
vice in January 1941 with the 
101st Field Artillery. Yankee 
Division and was recently dis- 
charged as a First Sergeant. 
Before the war, he practiced 
law at 55 Kilby street Boston. 
o 

Bernard Burke, Jr., 

Discharged from Navy 

— O — 

Bernard M. Burke. Jr.. Ph.M, 

3 c, USN. son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Bernard M. Burke of 29 Rich- 
mond road. Newton has receiv- 
ed his honorable discharge from 
, the Navy following 33 months of 
service. He was assigned to the 
USS Hendry APA 118 and served 
in the European and Asiatic the- 
aters. He is a graduate of Bos- 
ton College High School and at- 
tended Boston College for one 
year before entering the service. 
He was the winner of 4 letters 
in hockey and one in football. 


Federation- 

i Continued from Page t) 

appeal, from Mrs. Carl S. Floyd, 
for 500 bed side laundry bags, 
for Rutland Veterans. 

Among the many speakers, 
was Mrs. William C. Whitman, 
who reviewed pending Legisla- 
tion on Beacon Hill. Mrs. Max 
Ulin. in discussing “International 
Relations." urged Club Women 
to study the news carefully, in 
order to discriminate between 
the sensational headlines and 
the real underlying problems, 
that confront the world today. 

Mrs. John A. Jennings, brought 
an appeal from the Navy Base 
for knitted sweaters, etc., hand 
kerchiefs for boys in the hos- 
pitals. and explained the "French 
adoption Plan,” which includes 
signing up to send, twice a 
month, a letter and box to French 
children. 

Among the guests at the lun- [ 
cheon were: Mrs. Oscar J. Price. 
Mrs. Chester Perrinc, Mrs. Phil- 
ip J. Perrinc, Mrs. Warren C. 
Whitman. Mrs. William G. Priest. 
Mrs. Clifton S. Hall. Mrs. Robert 
E. Powell, Mrs. Burr J. Merri- ; 
am. Mrs. Harold H. Given, Mrs. 
Joseph E. Davidson. Mrs. John 
E. Spike. Mrs. John H. Cheslcy. 
Mrs. William A. Robb. Mrs. Park : 
man Collins. Mrs. Rebecca J. j 
Bell, Mrs. Leslie E. Wright. 



GENERAL COURT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

GAVE FIRST AMERICAN PATENT 

IN 1646 . . . 300 YEARS AGO ... TO 
J0SEPHJENKE5, PIONEER IRONWORKER, 
for WATER-POWER SAWMILL 


HE ALSO ORIGINATED 

THE MODERN 5CYTHE 

. . . AND FORGEO THE 

FIRST IRON KETTLE 




BUILD AMERICA 


Budget Committee 
Visits Pomroy House 

— o — 

The Budget Committee of the 


AWNINGS 

NEW or RE-COVERED 

IT r hat r a large felcction of pre-uar color* at preterit 

Order now and pay after installation in spring 

SHADES VENETIAN BLINDS 

WEATHERSTRIPPING 


WEDDING CANOPIES 


HOME SPECIALTIES COMPANY 

NEWTON CENTRE BIBclow 3900 


MARTIN’S TAILORING and CLEANING 

EXPERT DRY CLEANING, REPAIRING and ALTERATIONS 

98 Wyman Si., Waban ~ Tel. DEC. 8870 

ISext ol Waban Prut Office 

We are open for business to give the residents of Waban 
expert dry cleaning, repairing and alteration service. 

Our driver will call at your house on request. We would con- 
sider it a privilege for us to look after your cleansing and 
tailoring needs. 

A Cordial Imitation It Extended to You to Yitii Our Shop 


Mrs. Wilson H. Roads. Chair- ; Newton Community Chest, Inc., 
man, was in charge of the busi- spent a very enjoyable evening 
ness meeting, which began at j at onp of thc Mombor Agencies. 
2:00 p.m.. and among the prom- i , _ , _ Tr — 

inent speakers from the Federa- 
tion were: Mrs. Harvey E. Green- demonstrate what they learn in 
wood. Mrs. Joseph E. Davidson, i their several cooking groups, the 
Mrs. John A. Jennings. Mrs. j gj|-] s prepared and served a tasty 
! Nathaniel E. Smith. Mr.'. William t0 their guests. Mrs. 

J. McDonald. Mrs. Walter E. I . _ _ ., . e .. 

Boyd, Mrs. Robert Max Ulin and Hugh *>• Hmce. President ot the 
Mrs. Edward H. Averill. j Board of Directors, was hostess 

Mrs. William A. Leighton, j to thc following guests: Mr. 
chairman of the day. was in | Thomas Shirley. President of the 
charge of a luncheon given by ! Community Chest; Mr. Lawrence 
the Executive Board of the An- Damon , Vice-President; Mr. L. 
burndale Club at 1 p.m. for the Sumner Pruvne. Chairman of thc 
Guest Speakers and others in- I Budget Committee; Messrs. Wen- 
eluding Mrs. Arthur W. Cornell, rtcI1 B errv. John M. Powell. Au- 
Twelfth District Director; Miss brey Schurman. J. Arthur Noon. 
Adelaide B. Ball. President of the Lewis 0 Barrows. Dr. Chester 
28 Federated Clubs of Newton; AUol . a „ mcmbe rs of the Com 
and Mrs. Herbert J. Ham. Twelf- mlU ee; Mr. H. J. Pottcngill, Ex 
th District Publicity Chairman. ocutivc Secretary of the Chest. 

Light refreshments were also The following leaders and 
served at 1:30 p.m. to all attend- cooking club members were 
ing the Meeting, and special in- i present from their groups: Mrs. 
vitations were issued to all Presi- i Walter Forbes, Mrs. Frank Lar- 
dents and members of Clubs of rabce. Miss Phyllis Jensen. Mrs. 
the Twelfth District. Mrs. Brooks Adonias Gilbert together with 
Heath, hostess, and committee, the Misses Eleanor Aiello, Jean- 
were assisted by Mrs. James c tte Costa, Ann Wood, Elizabeth 
Dunlop and Mrs. William A. 1 Fahey. Christine Tocci and Mary 
Jackson, as Pourers. 

o 

Tourist: What a quaint little 
village. Truly one half of thc 
world is ignorant of how thc 
other half lives. 

Native: Not in this village, 
mister, not in this village! 


Costanza. 

The members of the Budget 
Committee were conducted 
through the House and told of 
the various activities carried on 
daily. Following supper and a 
short social period, the Commit 
tee held its meeting in the 
library. 


Beautify Your Home NOW! 


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$1.25 Weekly 


MISTER 

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Old Living Room Suite 
With NEW FABRIC 


up 


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Brocutelles — l)ama>k — Tapestry 
Friezes and Novelty Patterns 

• • 


Here's What 
You’re Sure 
to Get at the 


★ New Seat Cushions 

★ Flexible Steel Construction 

★ Springs Reset 

Diamond Tied 

★ Frames Repaired, 

Retouched and Braced 


BRISTOL SHOPS* New F .^" a " d k M °” . . 

Filling Where Needed 



Your Old Sturdy Frames 
Redecorated 
To Look Like New 


‘phtfte 


DROP A POST-CARD or 

WALtham 5689-w 


Our Estimator Will Call at Your Conven- 
ience with Chair Length Samples from 
Which to Make Your Selection — 


25 Years of Experience Will Briny You 
Comfort and Durability to Your Horne 
- Within the Price of Your Poekethook 


FLEXIBLE 

STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

Our own oriuinul iiii'tliiul. I In- monl vil.il 
purl of jour li \ iiik room anile in t lie 
nprinu t'ollklriirtioil. Our new webbing 
mi I umliTnlriirlure prrwnta -print: sag- 
ging. 



SMALL DOWN PAYMENT-NO FURTHER PAYMENTS UNTIL 30 DAYS AFTER DELIVERY 

Remember-There Is A Difference 


BRISTOL SHOPS 


Certified 

UPHOLSTERY 

5-Year 

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100 MAPLE ST., WALTHAM 


Mt tmhei : lleilhnin 
( huinher of ( niiion ii 


DEDHAM - Factory 


'Babyland Stores' 
Club, Gift Winners 

— o — 

"Babyland,” long a popular 
Waltham Nursery Furniture 
store, the first of a chain of 
Babyland stores, Specialty shops, 
devoted exclusively to fine nurs- 
ery furniture, mattresses, baby 
carriages, guaranteed and serv- 
iced. and toys has opened anoth- 
er branch shop at 829 Washing- 
ton street, Newtonville. 

A feature of the store is the 
Babyland Sister and Brother’s 
Club, started by Mrs. Evelyn 
Ostrow, owner and acting mana- 
ger of the store. A gift is given 
every month to one of their 
customers’ children, and the chil- 
dren are photographed at the 
store. 

Master Olive Wilson, three- 
year-old son of Dr. and Mrs. Nor- 
man J. Wilson of 90 Ellicott 
street, Needham. Mass, won the 
gift for December, a solid maple 
table and chair set. photograph 
will be in next week’s Graphic. 

Miss Patsy Bartley, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Bartley 
of 22 Walnut place. Newtonville. 
was the January winner of a 

doll’s basinett complete with 
mattress and doll. Her photo- 

graph will be in next week’s 
Graphic. 

Mrs. Ostrow will be glad to tell 
you all about "Babyland’s Sister 
and Brother’s Club.” 

"Babyland” carries a full selec- 
tion of nationally advertised 
merchandise, nursery ensembles, 
cribs. wardrobes, chests of 
drawers, mattresses, lamps, fi- 
nest baby carriages, walkers, 
strollers, everything necessary 
to make sister and brother com- 
fortable, also high chairs, play 

yards, auto beds and chairs, 

I •able and chair sets desks, rock- 
| ers, doll furniture, educational 
toys, doll carriages, all metal, 
large carts, hobby horses in all 
sizes, everything to make the 
youngsters happy. 

Better take out that dry old 
Christmas tree and carry it to 
the dump: it’s a fire menace in 
the cellar or the store room. 

C 03 CIIOXWE.VLTII OF 
M VSSACIU SKTTS 
M I'MIen. x. .«s. PROBATE COURT 

I' all persons Interested i n the 
••state of 

Cora Goodwin HunlresN 
late of Newton In said County, de- 
i ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
’-a ill Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of mi id deceased by Kathleen 
Huntress Henlngcr of Davenport in 
Hie State (> f Iowa, praying that she 
!"• appointed administratrix with «he 
will annexed of said estate, without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
<>r your attorney should tile a writ- 
ten appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock n the fore- 
on the eighteenth day of Febru- 
ary. 1916, the return day of this cita- 
tion. 

Wltn< s, John C. I .egg, it. Ksqulre, 
Imisi Judge Of said Court, this 
twenty-third day nf January in the 
> cut* one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

CX) • a II Register 

COMMON WKAI, ill or 
M \SN \l || | M | | s 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons Interested in the 
estate of 

E, It a ruble A'hrinlen 

I also . ailed Edward llarol le Aslum- 
i den late of Newton in said Count.', 
deceased. 

Hon has been presented to 
n. praying that Aide Harris 
Ipswich In the County of Essex, 
hr appointed administratrix with the 
will annexed of said estate not nl- 
renrtv idmini tered. without giving n 
surety on her bond. 

If vou desire to object thereto you 
nr \niir attorney should Hie a written 
appearance in said Court .at Cam- 
bridge before ten o’clock III tile fore- 
noon on tlu- fifteenth day of Feb- 
ruary 19p., the return day of this 
citation. 

Wltm ss John • '. I .eggat, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this twen- 
ty -dgl.tli day of January in the year 
thousand nine hundred ami forty- 


Dr. Donald Wyman to 
Speak on America's 
Greatest Garden 

— o — 

The garden about which Dr. 
Wyman will talk, when he ad- 
dresses the Waban Woman’s 
Club next Monday afternoon at 
the Neighborhood Clubhouse, is 
our world famous Arnold Arbor- 
etum. She shows not only the 
glorious spring blooming, but 
follows the sequence of color 
throughout the year. Dr. Wy- 
man is horticulturist at the Ar- 
boretum, and has made valuable 
contributions to the study of the 
growth of woody plants. 

In conjunction with the pro- 
gram of the day the Art Com- 
mittee will exhibit a large group 
of original flower paintings by 
Mrs. Audrey Soule of Jamaica 
Plain. 

Following the meeting, tea will 
be served and the pourers will 
be Mrs. Edson B. Smith and Mrs. 
Roland F. Pease. 

— o — 

The Literature Committee of 
the Waban’s Woman’s Club an- 
nounces the final lecture of this 
season by Mrs. Bond on Tues- 
day morning, February 19lh in 
the Neighborhood Clubhouse. 
She will discuss the spring books 
as well as give glimpses of au- 
thors whom she has interviewed. 


Crafts Volunteers Needed 
At Cushing Hospital 

— O — 

Leather Craft Workers are ur- 
gently needed to work with pa- 
tients at the Cushing General 
Hospital, it is reported by Mrs. 
George Rawson, chairman of 
Arts and Skills for Newton Red 
Cross. "Anyone who has done 
leather work with scouting or 
similar programs is eligible.” ex- 
plained Mrs. Rawson, "since we 
arc prepared to give an inten- 
sive refresher training course, if 
necessary." 

All who are interested in this 
type of service to sick and 
wounded service men should 
telephone Mrs. Rawson at BIG- 
elow 5659, and make an appoint- 
ment for an interview. 




MX. 


LORI NT! IV 


JORDAN. 

Register. 


COMMON' WF. V I. Ill OF 
M \NSArill M l IS 

- x. PRORATE «’» )URT 

alt persona liiterexied In the 


COMMON WK VI. I’ll OF 
.MASSAC II r.SKTTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of 

Marjorie Shu in way 

late of Newton in said County, dc- 
censed. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying Unit Helen Shuin- 
vvay Cutter of Newton in said County, 
be appointed administratrix of said 
estate, without Riving a surety on 
her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should tile a writ- 
ten appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on t He fifteenth day of Febru- 
ary 1946. the return day of this cita- 
tion. 

Witness, John C. Leggat, Ksqulre, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-fifth day of January in the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LORING f*. IORDAN. 

(N> J31 - f". 14 Registert 

COMMON WJi V l l H OF 
M ASS AC II I'SKTTS 

Middlesex, ss. I’ROBATE COURT 

To 

Itniiert. Leslie Morway 

of Essex Junction, in the State of 
Vermont. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife, Floy Hamilton 
Morway praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between her- 
self and you be decreed for the cause 
of cruel and abusive treatment and 
praying for custody of and allow- 
ance for minor child. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should Hie a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge within twenty-one days from 
tlie first day of April 1946, the return 
day nf this citation. 

Witness, John C Leggat. Esquire 
First Judge -f said Court, tliis 
thirtieth day of January in the yeni 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
six. 

LOR INC I\ JORDAN, 
i n i c; - 1 1 -_‘i Reglstei . 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
M ASS At IIIM. ITS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of 

it ii t ii <l Ollinuscn 

late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
Instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by Atlee L. 
Percy of Newton in said County, 
praying that he he appointed execu- 
tor .thereof, without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should tile a written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ton o’clock In the fore- 
noon on the t went v-seventh day of 
February 1946, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat. Esquire. 
First Judgi of ild Court, this 
second day of February In the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
six. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

(N) 17-14-21 Register. 


liiMtru 
will n 
of l|i 
pr.i v ii 

said 


her 


said dei 
ich In 
Hint 
tl lx V 
lltu. I 
olid. 


presented to 
of o ' oi t on 
o he tile last 


ivltli the Will an 
giving 


exert "f 
surety 


If you desire to object thereto you 
or v.iii attorney should Hie a writ- 
ten appearance In s ild Court at Cam- 
bridge be f o io ten o’clock In the fore- 
noon on the fifteenth ilav of Fubru- 
rv 19 4*:, the return day of this cita- 


tion. 


Legg.i 


Ksqulre, 


Witness. John 

Flint Judge of said • olirt. till' 
I w « ni v -fourth day of January in tin 
vc.ir mia llioiin.iiid nine bund red and 

' i' LORING P. JORDAN. 

IN) JJl-ILU lUgisUr 


COM MON WK ALT II OK 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To nil persons Interested in the 
estate of 

Edwin K. 4J n I n In n 

late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 

\ petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
ini 'i union! put port Ing to be the tael 
will of said deceased by Richard A. 
Crain of Melrose in said County, 
praying that lie lie appointed admin- 
istrator with the will annexed of mild 
estate, without giving a surety on his 
bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should Hie a written 
uppeuntiico In hu Id Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o’clock in the fore- 
noon on the eighteenth day of Feb- 
ruary 1946, thc return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John <’. Leggat. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this twen- 
ty-fourth dn v of January In the year 
one thousand nine hundred and fort) - 

LORING P. JORDAN. 


COM MON WEAL I'll OF 
M V NS At II I Ml IN 

Middlesex, ss IMP IRATE '’OURT 

To all persons Interested In the 
estate of 

Mu run let ll nth llrady Farrell 

lair of Albany. In the Statu of New 


York, 


ril. 


lie Will of said 
deceased have presented to said Court 
for allowance their Hist account. 

If you desire to object thereto yo 
or your attorney should Hlo a written 
uppcaninee 111 s.ibl Court at Ciim- 
liridgi.' before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the twenty-seventh day of 
February 1946, the return day of this 
citation. 

witness, John c. Leggat. Ksqulre. 
Flj ' luilgt Ol -." I Court, this 
thirty -fit day nf January in the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

(N) (7-14-21 Register 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 14. 1946 


60 Veterans Join 
Burns-Kerr Post A.L. 

At the mooting of Burns-Kerr 
Post, 333, American Legion, hold 
in thc War Memorial Building, 
Newton Centre on Wednesday 
night, February 6, sixty veter- 
ans of World War II were en- 
rolled as members of the Post. 

About 700 persons including 
250 recently discharged veterans 
were present at the meeting. A 
talk on "Veterans’ Rights" was 
presented by Commander Law- 
rence Quigley of the Soldier’s 
Home in Chelsea. 

Mrs. Patrick Duncan, president 
of the Newton Chapter, War 
Parents of America, endorsed the 
now post and promised the as- 
sistance of her chapter. Mrs. 
Duncan also reviewed thc work 
done by the War Parents during 
thc recent conflict. 

Commander Edward J. McPhoe 
was in charge of the meeting. A 
group of piano selections were 
played by Frank Geary, former 
pianist for Paul Whiteman. 


Refreshments were served by 
the War Parents under direction 
of Mrs. Charles Duffy, assisted 
by Mrs. Margaret Hoar, Mrs. 
Mary Ellis, Mrs. John T. Burns 
If, Mrs. John Connelly and Mrs. 
D. Parker Henley. 


SCREENS 

Wood or Metal 

Rewired er New 
Porches Enclosed 

Bronze Wire 
Now Available 

Place Orders NOW 
For Guaranteed Delivery 

Home Specialties 
Company 

Newton Centre BIG. 3900 


ptecnmiNMwmivioN luamt.mwm co. 



• NEWTON 
ELECTRIC APPLIANCE ca 

REPAIRS ON ALL MAKE% OF APPLIANCES 

PHONE LMELL49VI -817 BEACON IT- HEWT0N CENTRE 


Another Wartime 
Restriction 
Lifted! 

SAVINGS BANK LIFE INSURANCE 
AGAIN ISSUED IN AMOUNTS UP TO 

$ 25,000 



As a special wartime precaution, the amount of new Savings Bank 
Life Insurance on anyone person was temporarily limited to $10,000. 
Now, this low-cost protection is again available to persons in good 
health in amounts up to $25,000 (except at older ages). 


SAVINGS UP TO ONE-THIRD 

Savings Bank Life Insurance provides all regular types of policies 
direct-to-the-buycr at lowest over-the-counter cost. Comparisons show 
savings up to one-third or more, chiefly due to low selling expenses. 
It costs less because “you have to ask for it." 

Call or Write 

NEWTON 

Savings fault 

JI6 Wuhington Street cc Newton Corner 
Ntvle u’r Otdtu Path 

Even If YOU Don’t Need Insur- 
ance - - - Your Family DOESI 



BUY 

SAVINGS BANK 
LIFE INSURANCE 

at lowest cost 




Nlore young women and girls arc needed by the 
telephone company. No previous experience is 
necessary. 


Pay begins as soon as you start training here at 
I home. Thc work is interesting and done in pleasant 
J surroundings. Your fellow workers are congenial. 

I Steady employment, good wages and vacations 
I with pay make this work unusually attractive. 

I It's easy to apply. 

| Act at once. You t^ay telephone to inquire 

i about these positions between M:30 A.M. arid 

11 P.M. without charge, by calling lintcr- 
' prise 1000. 

! Emp/ojnicnt Office ■ 245 State Street Boston 

NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CO j 









MAYOR GODDARD opens Newton Red Cross two-day blood donor drive for plasma for 
civilians in Massachusetts. The Mayor's wife awaits her turn to donate. Left to right: 
Nurse's Aide Mrs. John F. Wheelock; Mrs. William H. McAdams, donor; Nurse Miss Eliz- 
abeth White, Mrs. Goddard, Mayor Paul M. Goddard, and Mrs. Robert M. Moore Jr. 


Central Club. Newtonville 
To Present Annual Show 


W. F. Beckwith 
Released fiom 
Active Duty 

— o — 

Lt. Winslow Franklin Beck- 
with, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. W. 
Beckwith, of 4 Wlnthrop street, 
West Newton has returned from 
active duty, as a Navy Fighter 
Pilot. He has been released to 
inactive duty tn the U. S. Naval 
Reserve. Lt. Beckwith was 
flight instructor at the Instruc- 
tors School in Pensacola for two 
years. Recently he was on flight 
duty In the Canal Zone, South 
America and the Galapagos 
Islands. 

He has resumed his law prac- 
tice, as a Junior Associate in the 
firm of Hale, Sanderson, Byrnes 
and Morton, and also is teaching 
law in the Boston University, 
Schol of Law— Evening Division. 


Mis. John F. Biown 
Re-elected President 
Dist. Nursing Assoc. 

— O — 

At the annual meeting of the 
Newton District Nursing Associ- 
ation held at the Claflin School, 
Mrs. John F. Brown of Auburn- 
dale was re-elected president of 
this Community Chest agency 
which is marking its 48th Anni- 
versary. Serving with Mrs. Brown 
as officers are Mrs. Horatio 
Rogers, Mrs. W. V. M. Fawcett, 
Mrs. Sheldon D. Dunlap, Mrs. 
John T. Croghan, Mrs. Harry N. 
Guterman and Mrs. Stanley An- 
derson. 

Eleven new directors from all 
parts of Newton were elected 
to serve on the Board which in- 
cludes: Mrs. Louis W. Arnold, 
Mrs. Maurice B. Biscoe, Mrs. 
Stanwood G. Bradlee, Miss Gret- 
chen Clifford, Mrs. Theodore D. 
Clark, Mrs. Irving Fisher, Mrs. 
Orville Forte, Mrs. William T. 
Glidden Jr., Mrs. Roy G. Hoskins, 
Mrs. Winslow R. Howland, Mrs. 
Edgar M. Holmes, Mrs. Albert S. 
Hutchinson, Mrs. Matt Jones, Sr., 
( Continued 071 Page 5) 


After its discontinuance during 
the war, the Central Club of New- 
tonville is renewing the tradition- 
al annual show of the club the 
evenings of March 1st and 2nd in 
Woodward Hall of the Central 
Congregational Church, Newton- 
ville. This is the fortieth anniver- 
sary year of the club and the 
shows were inaugurated many 
years ago to liquidate the organ 
fund of the church. 

The play this year is a 
“straight/' the immensely popu- 
lar, long-run Broadway hit of the 
early twenties “Captain Apple- 
jack” by Walter Hackett and with 
Wallace Eddinger in the lead role. 
The characters, as revived by the 
Central Club next week are as fol- 
lows, in the order of appearance: 
Lush Randolph Merrill 

Poppy Faire Gladys McCullough 
Mrs. Agatha Whatcombe 

Helen Lonsberry 
Ambrose Apple john 

Alvin Whitmore 
Anna Valcsk Lorraine Holmes 
Mrs. Pengard Edna White 

Horace Pengard , 

Harold Lounsberry 
Ivan Bowlsky Russell Baker 
Palmer, a maid Sally Pilsbury 
Dennet Loring Kidder 

Johnny Jason Elmer Pilsbury 

Coaching the production, is 
Miss Louise Wethcrbee — assisted 
by: Charles W. Peterson and 
John E. Adams, Properties: Mrs. 
Kathryn Abrams, Costumes; 
Chester Hervey, Stage Manager; 
Robert Dailing, Scenery. Tickets 
will be on sale at the door. Cur- 
tain rises at 8:00 p. m. each per- 
formance. 


ARTIFICIAL TEETH 

REPAIRED ^SERVICE 

BY EXPERTS 

78 OTIS STREET — NEWTONVILLE 

BIGelow 7033 


“The Torch Bearers” 

A three-act comedy 
NEWTON CENTRE 
WOMAN’S CLUBHOUSE 
1280 Centre Street 
Friday Eve., March 1 at 8:30 
Tickets ,90c including tax at 
the Door or 

CALL MRS. HENRY IDE 
BIGelow 2689 


Alice Dixon Bond To Speak 
At Hyde P.T.A. Meeting 

— O — 

Mrs. Alice Dixon Bond, author 
lecturer, and Literary Editor of 
the Boston Herald, will be prin- 
cipal speaker at a meeting of the 
Hyde School Parent-Teacher As- 
sociation, Tuesday night, Febru- 
ary 26, at 8 p. m. 

Mrs. Bond’s subject will be 
"Education in Books.” The pro- 
gram for the meeting is in charge 
of Mrs. Albert M. Walker. Mr. C. 
Everett Kinchla is President of 
the Hyde School PTA. 

Following Mrs. Bond’s talk re- 
freshments will be served. 


"Gay Nineties" 
Quartets to Compete 
At Glee Club Concert 

— o — 

The spring concert of the High- 
land Glee Club, to be held at 
the Newton High School Audi- 
torium Tuesday evening, March 
19, is shaping up as one of the 
most interesting the Club has 
given in years. Due to the re- 
turn of many of the veterans, 
the Club is better balanced than 
it has been in years, and the 
program is particularly attrac- 
tive with some new numbers, 
and of course numbers that the 
(Continued on Page 5) 
o 

Churches Throughout City to 
Stress Red Cross Appeal 

— O — 

“Saturday, February 23, and 
Sunday, February 24, have been 
designated as Red Cross Sab- 
baths,” says John S. Whittemore, 

: Chairman 1946 Fund Drive. “It is 
i hoped that all Red Cross Volun- 
1 teers who have uniforms will 
wear them to church on those 
days.” 

Mr. Whittemore and his Fund 
Committee have completed plans 
to raise Newton’s quota of $90,- 
000 and are all ready to go for the 
drive. 

Mrs. Wilfred Chagnon, Chair- 
man of Retail Stores, through di- 
ligence and hard work has lined 
up a very powerful committee to 
cover the business sections of the 
city. 

I Retail Store Captains are: 

1 Auburndale, Mrs. James Dun- 
lap; Newton, Co-chairmen, Mrs. 
Laurence Shaw and Mrs. Donald 
Gibbs; Newton Centre, Mrs. Ken- 
neth Crafts; Newton Highlands, 
Mrs. William F. Coan; Newton 
Upper* Falls, Miss A. Gertrude Os- 
borne: Newton Lower Falls, Mrs. 
Arthur Wood: Newtonville, Mrs. 
George A. Edmands, chairman, 
Washington street section: Mrs. 
John S. Whittemore, chairman, 
Walnut street section: Nonan- 
tum, Miss Lillian Swartz; Waban, 
Mrs. F. Brittain Kennedy: West 
Newton, Mrs. Frank Waters; 

I Waban Hill, Mrs. James Martin. 


11 Elks Get 25-Year 
Buttons at Past 
Exalted Rulers Night 

— o — 

Newton Lodge of Elks observed 
“Past Exalted Rulers’ Night” 
last Thursday evening with a din- 
ner at Elks Hall, Newton, when 
25 year buttons were awarded 
to eleven members of the Lodge. 
Exalted Ruler R. John Hender- 
son officiated. 

Those receiving the 25 year 
buttons were: 

Harry A. Hunt, George King, 
Edgar J. Vachon, J. Lawrence 
Riley, J. H. McCammon, Charles 
B. Burgess, Louis E. Gleason, 
•Daniel J. Riley, Robert J. Hunter, 
(Continued on-Page 5) 

Police Post A.L. 

To Be Organized 

— o — 

The charter of the newly or- 
ganized Newton Police Post, 
American Legion was signed by 
members at a meeting held in 
the War Memorial Building, New- 
ton Centre and it is expected 
that when the next meeting is 
held the charter will have been 
approved by the State Depart- 
ment of the American Legion. 

Thomas Cummings, comman- 
der protem presided at this meet- 
ing. Other temporary officers are 
John J. McGrath, secretary and 
Thomas W. McCormick, liaison 
officer. Veterans of both World 
War I and World War II who are 
members of the police depart- 
ment may become members. 

Plans are being considered for 
organizations of a drill team to 
be composed of veterans of World 
War II with David T. Dalton, 
who recently returned to the 
police force following his dis- 
charge from the service, as drill- 
master. 


The Newton Graphic 

NEWTON’S LEADING NEWSPAPER - ESTABLISHED 1872 


VOL. LX XIII. No. 21. 


NEWTON, MASS., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1916 


Single Copies 5c; $2.50 per Year 


34 Graduate from 
Hospital School 
Of Nursing 

— o— - 

At candlelight exercises held 
in the Nurses Home on Friday 
evening, the thirty-four members 
of the Newton-Wollesley Hospit- 
al School of Nursing, the final 
class under the Cadet Nursing 
plan, were awarded their caps by 
Miss Mabel McVicker, principal 
of the School of Nursing. 

Miss Edna Fritz, instructor of 
the Division of Nursing at Bos- 
ton University addressed the 
members of the class and the 
Rev. John Scammon of the An- 
dover Newton Theological School 
offered the invocation. Greetings 
were extended by E. Prentiss 
Jones, chairman of the Board of 
Directors of the School of Nurs- 
ing. The Nurses’ Glee Club sang. 

Local members of the class 
were: 

Elezabeth Boudreau, Newton; 
Louise Brown. Waltham; Virgin- 
ia Cupp. Wellesley; Olive Davis. 
Newton; Kathleen Edwards. 
Newton; Ruth Orethia, Wal- 
tham; Jean Pipes, Wellesley; 
Frances Shellenback. Newton 
Centre; Jean Sullivan, Waltham; 
Joan Thompson, West Newton; 
Helen Timmons, Wellesley Hills; 
and Marion Weir, Auburndale. 


Young Confirmed as 
Street Commissioner 


At a special meeting railed 
by Mayor Paul M. Goddard 
for Wednesday evening, Feb- 
ruary 20, the Newton Board 
of Aldermen confirmed the ap- 
pointment of Harold F. Young 
as Street Commissioner. 


Dr. Hitchen Pays Tribute to 
Spirit oi British People 


Robert Norton 
Speaker at 
Internat'l Lectures 


Mayor Recommends Salary 
Increases for Department Heads 

Submits Budget to Board of Aldermen 
• At Meeting Last Monday Night 



Makes Report to W. 
Church on His Visit 

State Federation and 
Boston Newspapers 
To Hold Forum 

— o — 

Several nationally well-known 
speakers will be on the program 
when the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Women's Clubs and 
Boston Herald-Traveler. Christian 
Science Monitor and Boston 
Globe collaborate for a two day 
Mid-Winter Meeting and Forum 
on Current Afairs — Wednesday, 
February 27. 1946, at the Hotel 
Statler. Boston, and Thursday, 
February 28, 1946. at the Shu- 
bert Theatre, Boston. Time — 
10:00 A. M. (both da vs) and 
2:00 P. M. 

Program 

'First Session) '10:00 A. M.) 
'Hotel Statler. February 27, 1946 ) 

Opening— Mrs. Edwin Troland, 
(Continued on Page 5) 


N. Unitarian 
to England 


Contrary to published report 
during the war, many churches 
in Great Britain have been 
empty- — only five percent of Pro- 
testants attend church, according 
to Dr. Herbert Hitchen, director 
of foreign churches for the 
American Unitarian Association, 
who has just returned from a 
five weeks’ trip to England, fly- 
ing both ways. 

Speaking under the auspices 
of th* West Newton Chapter of 
the Unitarian Laymen's League. 
Monday evening. Feb. 17. before 
an audience of more than 300 
persons, this was Dr. Hitchen’s 
first full report to the West New- 
ton Unitarian Church, which 
loaned its minister as “ambas- 
sador” to the cause of liberal 
religion abroad. 

President R. A. Stevens, of the 
Laymen's League, introduced Ex- 
Senator Weeks, who in turn pre- 
sented Dr. Hitchen. Dr. Frederick 
( Continued on Page 5) 


World Day of 
Prayer Observance 


The budget recommendations 
of Mayor Paul M. Goddard were 
submitted to the Newton Board 
of Aldermen at their meeting on 
Monday night. The total of the 
mayor’s recommendation was 
Under the auspices of the New- $6,273,544 or about $100,000 less 
ton Council of Church Women, than the amount recommended 
the World Day of Prayer will be by the city department which 
observed on Friday afternoon, was $6,392,839. 

March 8, 1946 at 2:30 p, m., in The mayor, however, recom- 
the Methodist Church, corner of mended increases in salaries for 
Langley road and Center street the following department heads: 
in Newton Center. Chairman of the Board of As- 

The Newton Council of Women scssprs. from $4,200 to $4,500. 


will present as the speaker, Mrs. 
Leslie E. Swain of Craigville, 
Massachusetts, who is serving 
her second term as the President 
of the Northern Baptist Conven- 
tion. Mrs. Swain has also been 
the President of the Woman’s 
American Baptist Foreign Mis- 


City clerk, from $4,350 to $4,500. 

Veterans Service Department 
commissioner, from $2,700 to 
$2,900. (Increase recommended 
for investigator, from $1,893 to 
$2,101: for clerk-stenographer, 
from $1,352 to $1,404). 

Public buildings commissioner, 


sion Society and previous to that from $4,200 to $4,500. 


ROBERT NORTON 

Robert Norton will be the 
fourth and last speaker in the 
series of International Lectures 
at the Newton Centre Woman’s 
Club for the year 1945-46. His 
subject will be “1945-50: The 
Critical Period." Reuben H. Mark- 
ham. scheduled to speak on this 
date, March 18. is still in the Bal- 
kans. Tickets for dinner preced- 
ing the lecture may be obtained 
from Mrs. J. A. Noon, Big. 1820. 

Newlon Eve. Schools 
Open 2nd Half Term 
Monday, February 25 

— 0 — 

The Newton Evening Schools 
open for the second half of the 
term on Monday. February 25. 
1946, at 7 p.m. and close May 17. 
Classes are held in the Techni- 
cal High School Building. New- 
tonville. and in the Hamilton 
School. Newton Lower Falls. A 
wide variety of subjects are of- 
fered including: 

(Continued on Page 5) 


Chagnon Named Chairman 
Of National Committee on 
Socialized Pharmacy of Medicine 


Newton Teacher 
Passes Bar Exam 

Miss Anna L. Ryan, teacher of 
the fourth and fifth grades at 
the Lincoln-Eliot School. New- 
ton was one of eight women who 
passed the December bar exam- 
inations according to a list an- 
nounced last Thursday by Wil- 
liam H. Hitcock. chairman of the 
Board of Examiners. 

Miss Ryan will be recommend- 
ed for admission to the bar on 
March 6. She is the daughter of 
Mr. James Ryan of 1667 Com- 
mercial Street, Braintree and 
sister of Dr. Robert R. Ryan, 
medical examiner of the Fourth 
Norfolk District. She was grad- 
uated from Boston University 
and the Portia Law School. 


she served as Home Base Vice- 
President of the Society for nine 
years. She holds honorary de- 
grees from Brown University and 
Keuka College. 


Police chief from $4,250 to 
$4,500. (Increase recommended 
for police captain, from $3,100 to 
$3,200). 

Fire chief, from $4,100 to 


Mrs. Swain is well-known for $-1,500. (Increase recommended 


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her writings both in the form of 
religious plays and books. These 
writings have gained wide popu- 
larity among the young people. 

In 1938 Mrs. Swain was chosen 
as one of the representatives in 
the group of forty-five people 
from North America to the fa : 
mous International Mission Coun- 
cil at Madras, India. Her active 
work in national and inter- 
national church interests has won 
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committees serving interdenom- 
inational missions at home and 
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PICTURES FRAMED 
MIRRORS RESILVERED 
BROKEN GLASS REPLACED 

^WTON GLASS CO. 

302 Centre Street, Newton 
BIGelow 1268 


for two assistant chiefs, from 
total of $6,200 to $6,400). 

Sealer of weight and meas- 
ures, from $2,700 to $2,900. 

Health Department, health 
officer, from $4,000 to $4,500. 

Public Welfare Department, 
agent, from $4,000 to $4,300. 

Library Department, libarian. 
from $4,200 to $4,500. 

Recreation commissioner, from 
$4,000 to $4,300. 

Water commissioner. from 
$4,200 to $4,500. 

He also set the salary of a 
new street commissioner as 
$4,500 instead of the $4,200 the 
former .salary for that position', 
and a salary of $4,300 for the 
(Continued on Page 5J 


Gray Lady Class Graduates 
At U. S. Marine Hospital 

Mrs. Gordon Pinkham. Chair- 
man Gray Lady Corps. Newton 
Red Cross, for U. S. Marine Hos- 
pital. Brighton, announces the 
graduates of recently completed 
course at the Hospital: Mrs. W. 
Cornell Appleton Mrs. H. E. 
Bernt, Miss Nancy Bitner, Mrs. 
Richard H. Blaisdell. Mrs. Wesley 
T. Craig, Mrs. John L. Quigley, 
Mrs. Edward J. Murphy, Mrs. 
Gardon Russell and Mrs. Edith 
Shakespeare. 


Victory Shop Closed 

After four years of receiving 
magazines, cards, records and all 
kinds of recreational material for 
the service men the Victory Shop, 
located at 753 Beacon Street. 
Newton Centre, ceased function- 
ing on February 19. 

The women who conducted this 
collection center wish to thank 
the Newton residents for their 
splendid co-operation during the 
war years. 


Wilfred Chagnon, Commission* 
er of the Massachusetts Board 
of Pharmacy and proprietor of 
Hubbard's Drug Store, Newton, 
has been appointed chairman of 
the committee on Socialized 
Pharmacy and Medrcine by Pres- 
J> Otto Kohl of the National Ass- 
ociation of Retail Druggists. 

To be selected on a committee 
of this association is an honor 
and also a responsibility, this 
year in particular as the renewed 
attacks on Fair Trade, the in- 
vasion of the drug field by sup- 
ermarkets. the threats against 
standards of education and li- 
censure in pharmacy, all make 
it mdre necessary than ever that, 
the retail druggest of the coun- 
try be alert, and that they draft 
their best talent for strategic 
positions on the firing line. 

Other members of the com- 
mittee are Louis Fichel. Oakland. 
Cal.. Frank Landy. Bridgeport. 
Conn.. Pa: rick H. Costello, and 
William S Hanson. Creston. 
Iowa. Dan W Houser. Detroit. 
Mich.. J. A. Lacher. St. Paul. 
Minn ! Louis J Gstlin. New York 
City. Roger McDuffie. Greens- 
boro. N. C.. A.P. Geeenheimer. 
Cleveland Heights. Ohio. Henry 
DeHaven. West Chester. Pa.. H C. 
Burroughs. Dallas. Texas and H. 
E. Henderson. Seattle. Wash- 
ington. 


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PAGE TWO 


The Newton Graphic 

(Consolidated With Which Is The Town Crier) 
“Newfon’i treading and Oldest Newspaper” 
Fatahlished 1*72 
Published Weekly on Thursdays 

Offic# 11 Centre Arenue Newton — P. 0 Buildinf 
Mail Address: Bos 206 Newton 68. Massachusetts 

Telephone t, A Sell 4.154 

John W Fielding. Manager 

PHILIP 0~ AHUN 
Editor and Advertising Manager 

Entered as second-elaas mail matter at the post office at 
Boston. Mass., under the Act of March 3 1879 


The Issue Is You 

Many of the so-called liberal proponent* of ?t.*»to or social- 
ized medicine take the doctors to task for opposition to such pro- 
posals. with the implication that medicine in general is a balky, 
backward profession. These attempts to draw a black and white 
line around a grave problem arc unwarranted. As a member of 
the medical profession has pointed out to his colleagues: ’'Our 
problem — ami our only problem — is to see that these medieal- 
economic questions are answered in such a manner that tb* best 
elements of medical science and medical practice are maintained. 
We must make certain that the quality of medical care docs not 
suffer in an effort to increase the quantity or the availability.” 

What quite a few people do not seem to realize i* thht it 
is their welfare more than the doctor’s that is at stake. When a 
lay enthusiast for a super-political scheme to revalutiSnize med- 
ical rare shouts his case over the protesting heads of medical 
men. he is assuming a heavy responsibility. If his scheme is 
adopted and fails to work out. the health and lives of millions 
will be jeopardized. Even if the mistake is remedied by congres- 
sional action, those who were injured by an unwise law. will re- 
main. The nation will have learned the hard way. that adequate 
medical care is not merely a matter of writing a law. 

So remember, when you hear discussions over socialized 
medicine, the real issue is how best to take care of you. rather 
than the picayune question of whether medicine is “reactionary” 
or ''liberal.” 


Fair Employment Act Is Sucker Bait 

There has been more downright drivel peddled in behalf 
of the misnamed Fair Employment Practices Act than for any 
piece of political hocus-pocus in many years. 

The Act seeks to make employers hire more Negroes. Ora- 
torical politicians wave the flag, talk about the Atlantic Charter 
and the Four Freedoms, and tell how we fought this war to bring 
freedom and equality to the world. 

They don't say that the Fair Employment Practices Act 
which would force an employer to hire a Negri', would not require 
the same employer to hire a white person or a Negro if he refused 
to join some specified labor union. 

There is no longer any freedom for a white laborer, or a 
Negro laborer, to earn a living in the United States in basic in- 
dustries tinless he first pays labor organizations for that privi- 
lege. Why should Congress talk about a fair employment act 
for either a white man or a colored man. and then, by legisla- 
tion or lack of legislation, prevent a man getting a job” 

It has remained for Senator Millard Tvdings of Maryland 
to bring the hypocrisy of the Fair Employment Practices Act 
into the open. He seeks to make the bill at least honest in its 
purpose by urging its senatorial sponsor? to carry out fully and 
logically their professed* principles by supporting an amendment 
making it illegal to deny a job to any man because he is not a 
member of a union. How can an act be called a fair employment 
act unless that is dune? 

Senator Tydin?.-' suggested amendment would bring back a 
Tnan'^ constitutional right to earn a living in the United States 
without paying for the privilege, and leave him free to join or 
not to join any organization he sees fit. There should he no 
discrimination against any workman merely because of his race, 
creed, political or labor affiliations. 



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THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY, 21. 1946 


Politics With 
Color 


iT/i# opinions eiprcaaea in this 
column art the writer's own ana 
do nut necessarily reflect the views 
or policy of this newspaper. — Edi- 
tor ’.« Note). 

Mr. Ickej 

Never In the history of the New 
Deal has there been so much ex- 
citement as last week, when wal- 
loping Harold L. Ickes retired 
from the Washington scene after 
banging the ball over the fence in 
deep centre field and bringing his 
dramatic end. 

What will happen now? First of 
all. the administration is exceed- 
ingly busy trying to cover up this 
new schism in the so-called Dem- 
ocratic party. Thij will require 
all the brains and ingenuity of 
the versatile Mr. Hannegan, the 
brilliant ManFriday of the ad- 
ministration. The point is that 
Mr. Ickes, with all his faults and 
eccentricities, happened to be 
about the best administrator in 
the entire New Deal outfit. 
Furthermore, everybody knew 
just where he stood at all times, 
because he called his shots with- 
out fear or favor. Even men like 
our own Bill Cunningham, who 
conducted a regular Fred Alien- 
Jack Benny feud with him for 
many years, was moved to say a 
number of kind things about the 
gentleman as he passed noisily 
out of the picture. Yes. Wash- 
ington will be different without 
Mr. Ickes. 

Finally, the Republicans are 
still licking their chops over iJljs 
new branch in the mongrel Dem- 
ocratic party. It is one of the best 
breaks the G.O.P. has had in 
years. Even the Old Master, the 
late Mr. Roosevelt, would have 
been hard pressed to laugh this 
one off. 

The Strike Situation 

Just in case some of my read- 
ers do not follow Drew Pierson in 
the Traveler, it is worth pointing 
out that it now seems to be 
understood that President Tru- 
man could have averted the chaos 
of the past four months of strikes 
if he had refused to follow his 
close friend. John Snyder. Snyder 
turned down the very scheme 
which has now been put into op- 
eration The difficulty then was 
that Snyder did not care for 
Bowles and industry as a whole 
did not warm up t- Bowles either. 
Incidentally, It is now obvious 
that Snyder is by no means as 
valuable to the government as 
some of us have assumed. The 
big man seems to be Chester 
Bowles. 

lames Michael Curley 

There is no point in stepping 
on a man when he is down. How- 
ever, The Mayor of Boston has 
I been down so many times, with- 
out ever being out, that he is al- 
most an exception to the rule. One 
point seems worth stressing now. 
Let’s skip the question as to 
whether or not Mr. Curley should 
now be serving a prison sentence. 
Let’s skip, also, our own ideas as 
to what should happen to this 
brilliant and unpredictable public 
servant. As one leading Boston 
newspaper has recently pointed 
out. every citizen of Boston who 
cares for its good name should 
feel profound concern for the 
city’s reputation in other parts 
of the country and even abroad. 
Even a child can grasp the idea 
that Mr. Curley's various 
escapades constitute atrocious ad- 
vertising for Boston. The ques- 
tion therefore arises as to 
whether or not Mr. Curley should 
now resign as Mayor of Boston. 
Frankly, many of us feel that he 
should. It is a good bet, however, 
that this is the last thing which 
ho will do unless his doctor so 
orders. And that’s that. 

The Governor's Appointments 

The one appointment which 
gets under the skin of many New- 
tonians is, of course, the Gover- 
nor's choice of John J. Desmond, 
Jr., of Chicopee. Not that there 
is anything necessarily wrong 
with Mr. Desmond, who has been 
School Superintendent in his 
home city. Indeed, he has a rather 
good background in many ways 
and he most certainly has some 
! up-to-date ideas on education, 
especially with reference to vote 
rans. The trouble is that this po- 
sition is too important to become 
a political football. Men like our 
own Julius Warren do not grow 
on trees. When a man of this 
type can be persualed to leave our 
city’s service to function in a 
state-wide berth, it seems a pity 
to have a Democratic Governor 
wipe him off the slate for no 
other reason than the fact that 
he has no record as a "deserving 
Democrat." The Commissioner of 
Education, Mr. Warren, has not 
played politics, so far as the 
writer knows. He should not. 

I Neither should the Governor of 
the state play pol i tiers and throw 
him out of office without caus< . 
In the long run, the result of this 
kind of policy will be the refusal 
of most men of i distance in the 
educational field lo accept such 
an appointment. Too bad. 

Harold E. Stassen 

Further comments on the re- 
cent Stassen speech before the 
Middlesex (’lid) on Feb. 12 will 
have to in- deferred for another 
week for luck of snace Suffice it 
to sav now that I was startled 
to have one of our leading Re- 
publicans refer to this apeech as 


A Message to Mr. and Mrs. Citizen 

From 

The Newton League of Women Voters 

HKRK'S THAT BALLOT 

Whenever it is time for elections there is a service that the 
League of Women Voters renders to the citizens of Newton: — the 
dissemination of non-pnrtisnn voting information. 

There is a price for being a citizen of a democracy — not in 
money (for taxes are paid under any form of government i. but, 
in work. All citizens must put time and thought on the qualifi \a- 
tions of those who arc to represent .them, if a representative, dem- 
ocratic form of government is to function well. 

It’s not difficult to know nbout Mr. X. who is running for the 
national presidency, or Mr. Y, who wishes to be a national sena- 
tor. or even Mr. Z. who would like to he governor of the state or 
mayor of the city. But what about Messrs. A. B. (\ and D. who 
are up for (say county commissioner, state treasurer, or even 
alderman at large? 

The further down one goes in the scale of government, the 
longer the lists of candidates and the more confusing the choices 
for the voters. Vet a democracy -is no stronger than its local 
units, so that it is immensely important to have men of honesty 
and ability in city anti state offices. 

It is better not to vote at all than to vote ignorantly for the 
wrong candidates, marking the name that comes first on the 
list or the name of the one whose wife looked so stylish and at- 
tractive in the picture. 

And primaries arc important, too. If the best party can- 
didates aren’t chosen, as nominees, then there is no hope of having 
the right ones elected. 

To help the busy voter, the Newton League of Women voters, 
before each primary or election, prints a brief, factual, non- 
partisan account of each candidate. These bulletins arc handed 
to any citizens; blit, in the past, there has never been anywhere 
nearly enough of them. 

It is partly in the hope of having more money for this much- 
needed aid to all voters that the Newton League of Women Voters 
is seeking the contribution of more funds for its work. 

None of the League’s activities are more essential. It is trite 
but true to say that the foundation of good government is good 
men in public office. 


NEWTON 
In The 
Past 


Temple Emanuel 
Newton Headquaiters 
Greater Boston ’SOS' 

— o — 

Temple Emanuel, 365 Ward 
Stret, Newton Centre, has been 
designated as Newton headquart- 
ers in connection with the Great- 
er Boston S. O. S. (Supplies for 
Overseas Survivors) Drive which 
is under the sponsorship of the 
Combined Jewish Appeal, with a 
central depot at 716 Columbus 
Avenue, Boston. 

The drive will extend through 
March 31 and donations of food- 
stuffs. clothing and medical sup- 
plies may be left at Temple 
Emanuel. Mrs. Harold Berkopf 
and Mrs. Ira Nelson are co-chair- 
men of the drive in Newton and 
Norman Felnberg heads the 
Junior Devision. 

A joint appeal has been made 
by the Boston co-chairmen. Mrs. 
George Kahn and Mrs. David 
Small, for all men, women and 
children to help in this cam- 
paign. "The surviving 150,000 
Jewish children in Europe look to 
us for their bread, shoes cloth- 
ing and their lives," they stated. 
They also said more than 15,000 
cans of condensed milk wore 
shipped overseas last week for 
, distribution to displaced per- 
sons, from contributions already 
made in other sections of the 
country. 


Mount Alveinia Penny Sale 

— o — 

Mount Alveinia Club will have 
a Penny Sale Wednesday eve- 
ning, February 27th at 8:00 p. m., 
in the Philomatheia Chalet on 
Commonwealth Avenue, Newton. 

Many scarce and much sought 
after articles of which nylon 
stockings are an example will be 
featured as prizes. There will also 
be many other outstanding 
prizes. 

Proceeds from the sale will go 
to the Academy’s Building Fund, 
aimed toward construction of ad- 
ditional class rooms and a gym- 
f nasium. 

Acting with the Chairman Mrs. 
John T. Murray and co-chairman 
Mrs. Edward J. Sullivan is the 
President. Mrs. Angelo Traniel- 
lo. Girls from the high school 
will act as ushers. 

Assisting with the officers and 
members of the Board are Mrs. 
W. S. Casey, Mrs. T. J. Powers, 
Mrs. S. Kerns, Mrs. C. W. Lana- 
gan. Mrs. R. E. Keanr. Mrs. H. 
R. Paquet, Mrs. J. J. Quinn, and 
a large committee. 

a “Mother Hubbard" speech. Well, 
well. 

Weekly Quiz 

To the best of my knowledge, 
the answer to last week’s quiz 
is Harold F. Young, currently 
serving as Acting Street Commis- 
sioner. If anybody cares to chal- 
lenge that, especially admirers of 
Senator Saltonstall and Thomas 
W. White, I will be glad to dis- 
cuss the public records. tYos I 
contacted the City Hall author- 
ities. » 

This week's question is Name 
the states in the so-called "solid 
South." 

p.w.c. 


Lawrence Named 
Chairman Greater 
Boston Comm. Fund 

— o — 

John E. Lawrence who has just 
returned to civilian life after 
three and one-half years in the 
Pacific Theatre has been ap- 
pointed chairman of next fall’s 
campaign of the Greater Boston 
Community Fund for 1947 
needs, President Charles Fran- 
cis Adams announced today. 

An active leader in pre-war 
Fund campaigns as captain, di- 
rector and vice chairman for two 
years of the Boston Districts 
Division and as vice chairman 
of the Textile Division, former 
Lt. Comdr. Lawrence declared 
that “it is most inspiring to find 
that the Community Fund has 
been carried on to even greater 
heights during the difficult years 
of war. 

"This Is a magnificent achieve- 
ment on the part of the home 
front," he continued, "and I am 
very grateful to have the oppor- 
tunity for joining forces once 
more in this great work.” 

Starting with the First Marines 
at Guadalcanal, Comdr. Law- 
rence completed a colorful naval 
career as a member of Admiral 
Halsey’s Third Fleet staff in 
Tokyo. His decorations and rib- 
bons speak for themselves— 

! Legion of Merit, Bronze Star 
j medal (twice), Letter of Com- 
j mendation ribbon, Presidential 
i Unit Citation (Guadalcanal), 
Philippine Liberation ribbon with 
two stars for Leyte and Linga- 
yen, Asiatic ribbon with 11 cam- 
paign stars including the Solo- 
mons, Philippines, Formosa and 
Empire actions. 

A partner of James Lawrence 
and Company, cotton merchants 
of Boston, Lawrence is a gradu- 
ate of Harvard University, 1931 
and Harvard Law School and a 
member of the Massachusetts 
bar. His immediate interest in 
the 288 Red Feather service of 
the Community Fund includes 
directorship in the Church Home 
Society and Roxbury Neighbor- 
hood House. 


Waban Pianist 
Presented at 
Tea in Boston 


, ANIMAL 
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Waban’s young pianist, Cyn- 
thia Brown, who has been heard 
on the concert platform fre- 
quently this season, was pre- 
sented by Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
! Custance, well-known harpist, in 
a program of piano solos at a tea 
and musicale on Sunday after- 
noon, February 17, in the Music 
Room of the Exeter Theatre in 
Boston. 

The affair was one of a series 
arranged by Mr. and Mrs. Cus- 
tance to bring the work of young 
artists before the public in 
furtherance of their careers and 
was attended by a large and ap- 
preciative audience. Mr. Norman 
Foster, baritone, was also pre- 
sented on the same program. 

Catalytic cracking capacity of 
the United States will he in ex- 
cess of 42 million gallons daily 
when all of the 96 new refining 
units now built or building are 
completed. 


M Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 26, 1891 

The fate of a Newton man, 
George Winslow, who was among 
the unfortunates who succumbed 
to the hardships of the journey 
over the plains on the way to 
California in the days of the gold 
fever has been revealed through 
a’ crude memorial in the shape of 
a rough red sandstone monument 
near Fairbury, who wrote to 
Postmaster Morgan of Newton 
describing the rough shaft and its 
its inscription which read: 

George Winslow, 

Newton, Mass., 

Aged 25 years. 

The monument was located 
near the "cut off” in an isolated 
spot leading to the California 
trail, and the reverend gentle- 
man concluded that it marked the 
grave of one of the "Forty- : 
niners." His object Is writing to 
Postmaster Morgan was in the I 
hope of acquainting the relatives | 
with the burial place of the de- 
ceased. The story found its way 
into the Boston papers and on 
Tuesday, George W. Winslow, 
superintendent of the Waltham 
water works called upon Post- 
master Morgan and asked to see 
the letter written by Rev. Gold- 
smith. He said that he had read 
the account and that there could 
be no doubt that the crude shaf 
marked the spot of his father’s 
last resting place. "My father," 
said Mr. Winslow, "started from 
his home in Newton Upper Falls 
for California in March, 1849. He 
died the following June very sud- 
denly and was buried by his com- 
rades, exactly where his relatives 
never knew, until the facts re- 
garding the Nebraska monument 
was published." Mr. Winslow 
stated that his father’s relatives 
were scattered through the New- 
tons, Waltham and vicinity. One 
of the brothers of the deceased, 
Samuel Winslow, was for many 
years mayor of Worcester. His 
sister, Mrs. Orrin Whipple Is also 
living in Waltham. 

— o — 

The square by the depot (New- 
ton Upper Falls) was flooded 
with water the first of this week, 
and has been absolutely impass- 
able for anything but rubber 
boots at different times. A sug- 
gestion was made that the city 
be asked to provide jumping 
poles. It was only last week our 
contemporary suggested the use 
of a flat boat, but the jumping 
poles would be much less expen- 
sive and more practical if one was 
late for a train over on the op- 
posite bank. 

— o — 

50 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 21, 1896 

A bacteriological laboratory 
has been started in connection 
with the Newton Hospital 
through the generosity of Mrs. L. 
G. Pratt, Mrs. John Lowell, Mrs. 
T. B. Fitzpatrick, Mrs. Charles 
Dennison and others. Dr. C. A. 
Davenport will have charge of the 
laboratory and it is hoped that 
the physicians of Newton will 
give it their support. 

— o — 

A bill requiring bicycle riders 
to carry lanterns at night has 
been presented to the legislature, 
and there is said to be a good 
chance that It will pass. 

— o — 

25 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 18, 1921 

Rev. Fred W. Peakes comes to 
Newton as the new pastor of the 
Lincoln Park Baptist church. 

— o— 

In a wonderfully Impressive 
service, characterized by rever- 
ence, patriotism and eloquence, 
the memorial tablet, the gift of 
the class of 1919 to the Newton 
High School, was dedicated last 
Sunday afternoon before an au- 
dience which filled the large as- 
sembly hall of the school. 


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Reception for 
Father Dumas 

— o — 

A reception for Rev. Leo P. 
Dumas who recently was trans- 
ferred to St. Louis’ Parish in 
Lowell was held in Columbus 
Church where Ft*. Dumas served 
as pastor for 11 years, and as 
spiritual adviser of the St. John’s 
Holy Name Society. On behalf 
of the parishioners a purse or 
money was presented to Fr. Du- 
mas by Conrad Larosse 

Guest speakers were Aider- 
man Edward A. Fahey, County 
Commissioner Edwin O. Childs 
and Rev. Fr. Barrette. Among 
the guests were Fr. Dumas' 
mother and father. 


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PAGE THREE 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY, 21, 1946 


Noima Faber, 

Soprano, to Be 
Music Club Guest 

— o — 

At its monthly meeting on Feb- 
ruary 28th the Newton High 1 
School Music Club under the di- i 
rcction of its faculty advisor, Mr. 
Henry Lasker, will have the 
honor of presenting the distin- 



ON Tin; INSIDE 


by M Any IN It. COULD 


Farber, and Mr. Leo Litwin who 
will serve as her accompanist. 
Miss Farber is well known to 
Boston concert audiences for her 
highly successful Jordan Hall re- 
citals and her appearance last 
season with the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra under the baton 
of Richard Burgin. She has re- 
ceived the highest commendation 
from such critics as Warren 
Storey Smith, Cyrus Durgin, and 
Alexander Williams for her fresh, 
lustrous voice, her exceptional 
musical intelligence and taste, 
and her rare versatility coupled 
with a flair for the unusual. 

Part of the explanation for 
Miss Farber’s outstanding talent 
probably lies in the excellent ed 


cliffe and has spent several years 
pursuing her musical studies 
abroad, in Germany, Switzerland, 
and Belgium. With this excellent 


The Newton-Brookline basketball game last week was, in the 
opinion of your reporter, one of the most exciting inter-scholastic 
. .. games held thus far this season. After a full game composed 

gulshcd Boston soprano, Norma of moglly fou| shotH thc flnal whlst|e b , ew with thc scor( ! ' tled 

32-32. The officials then decided together with the coaches to 
play another 2-minute period in order to break the tie. At the 
end of this period the game was again tied 34-34. As a last resort 
the officials, captains, and coaches decided that the first team to 
score two points would officially be declared the winner. After 
Brookline bungled, and blundered* several opportunities to score 
Bobby Scanlon, Newton’s ace forward raced down the court to 
score a basket ending the game 36-34, Newton. Bobby was then 
carried to the locker room on the shoulders of his grateful team 
mates. 

This week’s outstanding coach is former Major Donald Enoch, 
Head Coach of Varsity Track. Last week Don’s Tracksters 
copped the class A state title with 32 points. Their nearest rival 
Boston English had only 17 points at the close of the meet. Mr. 
Enoch received his bachelor’s degree at Penn State and his Mas- 
ter's degree at Harvard. Since 1925 Mr. Enoch has been head ! 
coach of track at N.H.S. He was also coach of J. V. football in j 
1925-1926. When asked to express his opinion of what makfes his 
teams champions he declared, "Before I quit coaching I hope my 
teams can win 50 major meets. We’re up to 48 now. We’ve won 
everything there is to win at one time or another. We can’t miss 
with the top-notch gang of kids I've got. There all good boys." 
ucational foundation she has had This reporter would like to add that Newton can't miss with a 
for her career. Not only is the coach like Don Enoch. Good luck, Don, and I am sure as well as 
noted diva a Wellesley graduate every one else who follows track that you will not only win your 
and a Phi Bet Kappa, but she has meet No. 50 in the near future, but that you will -win many more 
a master’s degree from Rad- than 50. 

Harold McKusick, N.H.S. graduate, is now in Hollywood with 
George Handy’s band . . . Mr. Lingo, former N.H.S. music in- 
structor, is again teaching at N.H.S. after two years with the 
United States Navy . . . Harold Turin, graduate of N.H.S. with 
training there can be little doubt the class of 1944, has recently received his lieutenant’s commis- 
but that Miss Farber is entirely sion from the officers candidate school at Fort Bennings, Georgia 
deserving of the lavish praises • • • At the last English Club meeting the irmnibers had as their 
the critics have bestowed on her S UPS t speaker, Dr. Edgar J. Park, former president of Wheaton 
and that the Music Club of New- College, now retired. 

ton High School is highly honored At ,ast official word has come through concerning the motion 
to have the priivlege of present- ^ or c ^ as - s reunions it was vetoed at the last legislature meeting. 

As soon as the bill was mentioned it was quickly voted down. 1 1 
wonder why? Hmpf! (Some one blundered.) 

Unknown to most "teen age youth," Miss Harriet Gainsboro, j 
a typical teen-ager, has been modeling clothes for certain pin up 
magazine covers. No wonder, besides her pleasant smile and neat 
appearance, Harriet has a personality that really sparkles. Good 
luck, Miss Gainsboro, in your new career as a model. 

Dick Cohn has a new beachwagon that ho has named "How 
Little We Know," I wonder why? Melvin Ascher claims that he 


ing such a distinguished artist. 

The concert will be a doubly 
auspicious one, for Miss Farber’s 
accompanist will be Leo Litwin, 
the eminent Boston pianist and 
conductor. Mr. Litwin is well 
known not only for his work as 
soloist at the Boston Pops and 
Esplanade Concerts, but also for a nOW V 1 

his recordings, radio work, and knows but do( ' s ho, D,ck? 
his conducting of the Boston 
Orchestral Ensemble and the 
Boston Distaff Orchestra. This 
past season he has also presented 
a series of Sunday evening con- 
certs of light music at Now Eng- 
land Mutual Hall. 

With such a brilliant soprano 
soloist as Norma Farber and 
such a proficient accompanist as 
Leo Litwin the music loving fac- 
ulty and students of the high 
school can look forward to an 
outstandingly fine concert on the 
afternoon of February 28th. 


Two new sanctum sanctorum clubs have been formed in our 
fair city, they are thc "Three C.B.’s" and the Five B.B.’s. 

M.R.G. 


Auction in W. N. to 
Be Conducted by Well 
Known Auctioneer 

— o — 

On Thursday, February 28 at 
the Parish House of the Second 
Church, West Newton, the Wom- 
an's Council will sponsor an auc- , 
tion sale. Proceeds will be used 
for the Benevolent and Post-War 
Emergency Program of that 1 
group. 

Mr. Ralph W. Emerson of 
• Chelmsford, whose name and 
talents are known to many, will 
be the auctioneer. 

Household furniture, antiques, 
books, lamps, china, silver, bric- 
a-brac and sporting equipment 
will be featured in the sale. 

Mrs. W. Duncan Russell is the 
president of the Woman’s Coun- 
cil. The chairman of the auc- 
tion committee is Mrs. George 
M. Lovojoy assisted by Mrs. 
Richard B. Cole. 

Mrs. Charles E. Benson is 
chairman of the West Newton 
solicitors. Others working as so- 
licitors are Mrs. Harold R. No- 
den in Newton, Mrs. Harold D. 
Jobes in Newtonville, Mrs. Ralph 
Nutter in Newton Highlands, 
Mrs. S. B. Woodbridge in Waban, 
Mrs. Franklin K. Hoyt in Au- 
burndale, Mrs. Morgan S. Hur- 
ley in Newton Center, Mrs. Nor- 
man S. Wade in Newton Lower 


Library Trustees 
Hold Annual Meeting 

— o — 

The Annual Meeting of the 
Board of Library Trustees of 
the Newton Free Library was 
held on Friday, February 15, 
1946. The present officers of the 
Board, Mrs. Virginia M. Hutch- 
inson,, President; Mr. Thomas 
Weston, Treasurer; Mr. Harold A. 
Wooster, Secretary were unani- 
mously re-elected. Dr. Guy M. 
Winslow, President of Lasell 
Junior College, and library trus- 
tee since 1928, announced his re- 
tirement from the Board and 
was presented with inscribed and 


Hills. Miss Mary Lewis Speare 
made the library a gift of a 
"Rogers Group" statuary. Some 
thirteen hundred volumes were 
added to the library as gifts from 
friends. 

Mrs. Hutchinson referred to the 
death of Mr. C. J. Connick, who 
gave the beautiful medallions in 
the windows of the Newtonville 
Branch Library, was Chairman of 
the Art Committee of this Branch 
and loaned exhibitions of his 
paintings for display in this li- 
brary. Mr. Connick had a world 
reputation for his stained glass 
work. She also referred to plans 
for the “Annie Plummer Corey 


autographed books by his fellow Children's Room" planned as an 


trustees, in apprecition 
valuable services. 

Mrs. Hutchinson, in her 


of his addition to the Auburndale 
! Branch Library, to be paid for 
from a fund established by Mr. 
nual report, called attention to Frederick Plummer. The plans 
the value of books in supplying and specification for this addi- 
study material on world organi- tion have nearly been completed, 
zation and paths to peace and The annual rep6rt of Harold A. 
the need for trained, experienced Wooster, Librarian, told of some 
library assistants to properly of the difficulties in maintaining 
carry on the work of the li- normal library service under war 
brary. She said, "We have been conditions, the present challenges 
very fortunate in having the to improve and extend library fa- 
Mayor and Finance Committee cilitics, and the steps being taken 
sympathetic with our aims in to achieve this end. The book ad- 
the past, and we are hoping that ditions of the year were reported 
they will take steps now to make as 11,569 volumes, the reading 
it possible for us to make a tell- material expenditures $17,998, 
ing appeal to Simm n : and other from City Appropriations and ap- 


well-equippe' 4 library graduates 
to come to Newton and to stay." 

She reported thc outstanding 
gifts of the year as the "William 


proximately four thousand dol- 
lars additional from Funds. The 
book circulation of the year was 
reported as 701,646 volumes, at 


C. Strong Memorial Fund” of one the rate of ten volumes per capita 
thousand dollars, given by Miss or twenty-nine volumes per regis 


Isabel L. Strong in memory of 
her father, the interest to e used 
to purchase books of lasting 
value for the Waban Branch 
Library; the gift of three artistic 
figurines of Alice in Wonderland, 
to the Florence B. Sloan Memor- 
ial Study, by the Round Table 
of Children’s Librarians; the gift 
of the marble bust of Francis 
B. Hornbrook, D.D., to the Art 


Falls, Mrs. James Davies in ; Department bv Channing Church. 
Waltham, Miss Dorothy Eaves in Dr. Hornbrook was an outstand- 


Brookline, Mrs. Joseph N. Lovell 
in Boston, Mrs. Harold E. # Winn 
in Cambridge and Mrs. H. B. 
Morse in Wellesley. 

There will be a snack bar fea- 
turing sandwiches, ice cream and 
coffee with Mrs. Earle F. Bliss, 
Mrs. Edwin H. Rogers, Mrs. 
Harold A. Amidon.and Mrs. J. 
W. Franklin MacDonald in 
charge. 

Acting as bookkeepers and 
cashiers will be Mrs. William F. 
King, Mrs. Edward Pride, Mrs 
Clark Macomber, Mrs. Charles 
N. Gregg and Mrs. Frederick 
Wells. 

The sale will bo open to the 
public from 10:30 a.m. until 9 
p.m. of that day. 


tered borrower. It was pointed 
out that the condition of its pub- 
lic library has been called the 
best single factor in judging the 
spirit and morale of a commu- 
nity. The Newton Free Library 
has been in operation for some 
seventy-five years, and has been 
greatly aided by interested pub- 
lic spirited citizens as well as by 
its public support. 

o 

Mather Class 


ing community leader of a gener- 

atio *hago and the bust is the — o— 

work of thc distinguished Mas- The Mather Class will meet on 
sachusetts sculptor, Cyrus E. Dal- February 24 at the First Baptist 
lin. A carved oak chair presented Church at 9:45 a.m. Subject 
to Dr Henry Bigelow, was given “From Victory to Peace: The 
to the librarv by his grandsons, United Nations Organization be- 
Walter E. Hills and H. Bigelow gins to function." 


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T HE HEW 

Harriet F. Dane 
Betnms from India 

— o— 

Miss Harriet F. Dane of New- 
ton Centro who has been serving 
the armed forces in India with 
the American Red Cross, arrived 
at New York City on the USS 
General Brooks, January 3rd. 

Miss Dane, who was In India 
nine months, spent al! of her time 
in Bengal and Assam working 
in three different clubs and with 
the Cabua clubmobilc. With three 
other girls she opened the Red 
Cross Club at Parbatipur, a rail- 
road junction north of Calcutta. 
From there she went to the club 
at the 48th Air Depot in Chabua; 
assisted in closing that one in Oc- 
tober and in opening one for the 
130 4th Engineers. 

For a short while she worked 
with the Chabua Clubmobile, 
serving the troop trains of re- 
turning veterans en route to Cal- 
cutta and Karachi. She has ter- 
minated her services with the 
ARC, effective Jan 1, 1946. 

"The Torch Bearers" at N.C. 
Woman's Club March 1 

— O — 

Sons and daughters of Club 
members who will serve as ushers 
at the three-act comedy, “The 
Torch-Bearers,” to be presented 
at the Newton Centre Woman’s 
Clubhouse, Friday evening, 
March 2, at 8:30 are: Ruth Cas- 
ten, Betty Clark, and Shirley 
Gersumky; Stephen Conn, Abbott 
Rice, Whitman Richards, Robert 
Cochrane, Peter Conn, William 
Gersumky, and Richard Whit- 
ting. Mrs. S. Hardy Mitchell is 
chairman of the Reception Com- 
mittee assisted by the Misses Bar- 
bara Mitchell and Virginia Vau- 
ghan. Call Mrs. Henry Ide, Bige- 
low 2689 for tickets. 


OH GRAPHIC 

Merrill Elected 
President of 
Bachrach Associates 

■ — o — 

Joseph Merrill of Boston was 
elected for a second term as 
President, of the Bachrach Asso- 
ciates, maintained for and by the 
employees of Bachrach, Inc.. Por- 
trait Photographers since 1868. at 
the annual meeting held recently. 
Mary Foley of Newtonville was 
re-elected as Vice President, and 
Mrs. Claire Dolbier of Waltham 
and Gertrude Roode of Boston 
were ’retained % at their posts of 
Secretary and Treasurer, respec- 
tively. 

New members of the executive 
committee voted in for a term of 
two years were Joseph Quinn of 
Cambridge, Ruthmary Gilfillan of 
Boston, Julia Connors of West 
Newton, and Clifford Ohnemus 
of Waltham. Members of the 
executive committee whose term 
has not yet expired include* Rus- 
sell Lowell of Newton. William 
McDonald of Watertown. Priscil- 
la Gough of Cambridge and 
Martha Gruhn of West Roxbury. 


COMMON WEALTH OF 

MASSAC III SKI IS 

| Middlesex, ss. I'KORATK COURT 
To all person* Interested in the j 
| trust estate under the will <>( 

Austin II. Derntnr 

late of Newton In said County de- I 
ceased, for the benefit of Florence S. | 
! Decatur and others, 
i The trustees of said* estate have 
I presented to said Court for allowance 
• their tenth to twelfth accounts, in- 
clusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file •« written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon oil the thirteenth day of Man-h 
| 1916. the; return dnv of this citation. 

| Witness. John C I.eggnt. Ksr,uip . 

! First Judge of said Court this 
eighteenth day of February in the 
year one thousand nine hundred and j 
I forty-six. 

T. OR INC, fv JORDAN. 

<N) f21-2S-in7 Register. 


Upper Falls 

i The residents of Elliot, High. 
Summer and Chestnut streets 
jare very much concerned over 
a petition filed by Francis J. 
Hewitt on which a public hear- 
ing will he held at City Hall on 
Monday, March 4. 1946, to change 
the present route of the buses 
of the Middlesex and Boston 
Street Railway Co. from Elliot. 
High, Summer and Chestnut 
streets to Elliot. Oak and Chest- 
nut streets. This street railway 
ffas operated cars and buses over 
the bid route for the past 45 
years, serving the residents who 
lived in the area bordering the 
Worcester Turnpike. In the new 
proposed route only one end of 
the village would have trans- 
portation on this bus line. 

^ Rev. A. K. Fillmore will speak 
Sunday from a topic in honor 
of George Washington at 10:30 
a.m. at the Second Baptist 
Church. , 

Mr. William B. Pollock of the 
•Newton Centre Methodist Church 
will he the guest speaker at the 
First Methodist Church at 10:45 
a.m. Sunday, Feb. 24. Rev. W. 
Henry Shiilington will preach at 
7 p.m. from the topic "The Big- 
ness of Little Things.” 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Ketchum 
of Biddeford, Maine, were the 
week-end guests of Mrs. Ketch- 
urn's sister, Mrs. Kenneth New- 
comb of Oak street. 

Miss Julia Chernick of Ames- 
bury has been the week-end 
guest of Miss Beverly Boardman 
of Thurston road. 

Thc Choir Guild of the First 
Methodist Church will meet on 
Friday, Feb. 22, following the 
evening rehearsal for a social 
hour in the Parish Hall. 

A workers' dinner will be held 
on Thursday. Feb. 28, at 12 noon 
in the Parish Hall of the First 
Methodist Church. The Lend-a- 
Hand Group of the W.S.C.S. will 


Newtonville 

— o— 

R- Leonard White, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Clifford S. J. White of 
199 Harvard street, has been 
awarded a Fellowship in Path- 
ology at Tufts College where he 
is a member of the senior class. 

Nancy Hayes, daughter of 
Mrs. Edith Hayes, of 64 Pros 
port avenue, was on the honor 
roll at Bradford Junior College 
Bradford, at the end of the sem 
ester just completed. 

o 


Underprivileged 
Benefit at Osteo- 
pathic Hospital 

— o — 

A total of 157,506 osteopathic 
treatments were administered to 
the underprivileged of Greater 
Boston in the Out-Patient De- 
partment of the Massachusetts 
Osteopathic Hospital during the 
past lg years. Residents of every 
community in Greater Boston 


West Newton 

The regular monthly meeting 
of the Friendship Guild of Sec- 
ond Church will be held on Tues- 
day evening. February 26. Sup- 
per will be served at 6:30 p.m. 
with Mrs. Harry M. N. Shank 
and Mrs. Nelson O. Johnson as 
co-chairman. 1 

At. eight o’clock, the last half 
of the “Thaw-Asia Expedition" 
moving pictures will be shown. 
Anyone interested in seeing 
these pictures is invited to at- 
tend. 


were among the patients treated. 

The figures were revealed at 
a testimonial dinner given in 
honor of the retiring director, 
Dr. Alexander F. McWilliams, by 
the General Staff at the Boston 
City Club last week. Dr. Mc- 
Williams had served continuous- 
ly as the department director 
from the opening of the Hospital 
on March 5th. 1928. An illumin- 
ated parchment scroll expressing 
the appreciation of the staff, and 
certifying to his election as Hon- 
orary Director, was presented to 
him. 


Newton Centre 

Miss Barbara Hoyt, daughter 
of Lieut, and Mrs. Carter H. 
Hoyt, of 83 Sumner street, was 
a member of the program com- 
mittee for the annual House in 
the Pines-Tabor Academy dance, 
held recently at House in the 
Pines, Norton. 


o 

Waban 

Miss Elizabeth Little, 19 Grof- 
ton road. Waban. has been elec- 
ted freshman prom chairman as 
a result of recent voting at Sim- 
mons College. Miss Little is a 


freshman at Simmons. 


have charge. These noon din- Miss Nancy Jane Blanchard, 59 
ners are popular with the work- Wyman street, is a member of 
ers employed in the industries the committee in charge of the 
in Newton Upper Falls. Simmons College Dramatic club 

The Lend-a-Hand ‘Group of the spring production. Miss Blan- 
W.S.C^. will meet in the First chard has been active at Sim- 
Methodist Church parlor on Wed- mons as a member of the New- 
nesday February 27. at 8 p.m. man club and the Simmons 
for their monthly business meet- News. She is a sophomore in 
ing and social. the school of English. 


IT’S A LONG WAY 


from 



to 1946 


T HIS new year of 1946 marks an impor- 
tant milestone for Boston Edison Com- 
pany and its customers — thc completion 
of 60 years of Boston Edison service. 

From the moment the switch was closed 
at the Company’s first generating plant, 
February 20, 1886, Boston Edison has been 
supplying ample electrical energy to meet 
the community’s ever-growing needs for 
light and power, both during times of nor- 
mal progress and during times of war. 

Thc Company’s anniversary takes place 
at a time when thc world stands on thc 
threshold of peace. Behind lie many gruel- 
ling months, indelibly impressed upon 
men’s minds. Ahead stretch the transition 
years, years that shall test this country’s 
ability to maintain production and em- 
ployment, to promote a sound national 
economy, and in cooperation with other 
nations to maintain peace. 

Plans for the Immediate Future 

Against this historic background, Boston 
Edison enters its seventh decade, with 
faith and confidence in the future, manned 


by an organization equipped to meet the 
expanding electrical needs of this great 
industrial, commercial and residential 
community. The Company has now em- 
barked on a five-year program with ex- 
penditures totalling $40,000,000. This 
program embodies further increases in 
generating capacity, extension of trans- 
mission lines, substitution of alternating 
current for direct current in certain 
districts, and other modernization of 
facilities and service. 

On the occasion of this 60th anniversary, 
Boston Edison Company customers will 
also be interested in the recently an- 
nounced rate reduction beginning next 
month, which will effect a yearly saving of 
$1,200,000 to residential and commercial 
customers. In 1SS6 electricity was a luxury. 
In 1946 it is a low-priccd commodity avail- 
able to everyone. 

Thc men and women of Boston Edison 
pledge their continued devotion to the wel- 
fare of the community and take this oppor- 
tunity to thank the Company's customers 
for their cooperation in creating present 
cordial relations. 



The first electric generating station in Boston was placed 
in sen ice on February 20, 1886. in a stable at the corner of 
Havnaarket Place and Bumstcad Court. 

Thc little station of :886 generated sufficient capacity to 
light 800 lamps. These lamps were the hand-made, carbon- 
filament type . . . dim, short-lived and expensive compared 
to 1946 standards. 



HOST O \ KOI SOX COM PAX Y'S 

I 

GEX EKAT1XG ST ATI OX S ... l»46 



Electricity in the lirrloM, truitwortiiy servant of 
ihe modern home. It is instuiitly available. It eosta 
little to use. Vet think of all the duties it performs! 

It provides adequate light . . . cooks the meals 
(dtliciouslyl) . . . protects food by refrigeration... 
mixes the batter ... toasts the breakfast toast... 
makes the coffee. . . browns the waffle* . . . does the 
family laundering . . . vacuum cleaning dish- 
washing . . . sewing . . . water heating . air condi- 
tioning. . .entertains by radio (and in the not-foo- 


distant future, bv television as well).;. runs the 
children’s sun lamp . . . Susan’s hairdryer and all 
thc other labor-saving electrical appliances that 
are available or soon will be. 

Yes, for true home comfort, for lilc-long con- 
venience, for leisure and for safety ... in short, tor 
better living now and in the years to come, you can 
depend on Boston Edison sen ice. 

Electricity doc* more ami cost* lea* than any 
other item in the family budget. 


BOSTON EDISON'-— 


t)0 Years of Service Behind Vs. . . and a Brilliant Aeu* Era Ahead 


L Street Station. South Boston. 
250,000 kilowatts of generating capacity. 



Charles L. Edgar Station, Fore River. North Weymouth. 
1 60,000 kilowatts of generating capacity. 



Boston Edison’s newest station on Mystic River, Everett. 
100,000 kilowatts of generating capacity. 

. . . 11 Ur and Total of 510,000 kilowatts of generating 
capacity, prov iding ample electrical energy for all residential, 
commercial and industrial needs in the territory served by 
Boston Edison Company. 








PAGE FOUR 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


THURSDAY, FERRUARY, 21, 1946 


| MAY LUCAS | 

ft Cosmetic Consultant | 

{} dintrihutor l.uuirr't ( onmetirn ll 
B and Perfumrn 1 

*5 ADAMSON ST. 


RECENT WEDDINGS 


f ALLSTON 


Tel. ALG. 2404 


DR. FRANK A. JASSET 

Podiatrist — Chiropodist 

Now LocntPd At 

R!*« CENTRE STREET 

NATIONAL BANK RLDQ. 

Npwtnn Cornfr 

For AppoIntinfnU — Call BIO. 41MW 


Curtains 



i 


• COTTAGE SETS 

• DINETTE SETS 

• LUNCHEAN SETS 

• BRIDGE SETS 

• BUREAU SCARFS 


The 

LAWRENCE 

SHOP 

1300 WASHINGTON STREET 
WEST NEWTON 

Tiro doom from 
Went Netcton Theatre 



s4nd lie 
bride 


a 


tooje 

The Bcaconsfield for her WED- 
DING RECEPTION. Why? Be- 
cause she knew her every wish 
would be carried out . . . her 
Wedding Reception . . . that 

gay, social part of her Wedding 
Day . . . would be correct in 
every detail. 

We shall be glad to suggest un- 
usual decorations and delectable 
food combinations, cr if you have 
your own special ideas for Your 
Reception . . . tell us about 
them . . . we'll take pride in 
following them so the occasion 
will reflect your own charming 
personality, have all the glamour 
you've dreamed about. One of 
our seven beautifully decorated 
party rooms will furnish a perfect 
background for your Reception 
May we shoy/ them to you? 

The OVAL DINING ROOM is 

popular for Luncheon and Dinner 
The food is de icious, and you'll 
like the friendly, grocious atmos- 
phere. 

Luncheons are from 80e to $1.25 
Dinner from $1.25 to $1.75 

Tolephone ASPinwoll 6800 
ROBERT B. STOCKING, 

General Manager 

Hotel Beaconsfield 

A Sheraton Hotel 


Dodge - Lees 

— o — 

On Sunday afternoon, Miss 
June E. Lees, daughter of Mrs. 
Margaret Lees of 1241 Walnut 
street. Newton Highlands, be- 
come the bride of Wilford E. 
Dodge Jr., son of Mr. Wilford 
E. Dodge of 31 Wade street, 
Newton Highlands. The four 
o'clock ceremony was performed 
by the Rev. Morrison Russell 
Boynton. D.D.. in the First Con 
gregational Church, Newton 
Centre. Mr. D. Ralph MacLean 
was the organist. 

Wearing a gown of white bro- 
caded satin and tulle, the bride’s 
fingertip veil of tulle was caught 
to a heart-shaped crown. She 
carried a cascade of white glad- 
ioli and sweet peas. Miss Edna 
Lees’ was the maid of honor. She 
was gowned in aqua lace and 
tulle and carried pink gladioli 
and sweet peas. Raymond Pal- 
mer was the best man for Mr. 
Dodge. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dodge were both 
graduated from the Newton High 
School. After March 4. when 
they return from New York, they 
will live in Newton Highlands. 
o 

Cheney - Bjornson 

— o — 

On last Saturday afternoon in 
the Second Church in Newton, 
West Newton, Miss Beatrice 
Alice Bjornson. daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Herman R. Bjornson 
of 19 Webster place. West New- 
ton, became the bride of Paul 
Daniel Cheyney, son of Mr. Earl 
H. Cheyney of Honolulu. T. H. 
The four o’clock, double ring 
ceremony was performed by the 
Rev. R. Clyde Yarbrough. Ph.D. 

With her gown of white slip- 
per satin, the bride wore a veil 
of nylon net and carried gar- 
denias. Miss Emma A. Bjorn- 
son of Trenton, New Jersey, as 
maid of honor, wore light blue 
jersey. 

Richard Battan of New York 
City was the best man and the 
ushers were Robert Taylor, also 
of New York and George Bjorn- 
son of West Newton. 

Mrs. Cheyney was graduated 
from the Newton High School 
and Framingham Teachers' Col- 
lege. Mr. Cheyney was gradu- 
ated from Roosevelt High School 
in Honolulu and attended the 
University of Hawaii, Colgate 
University and Boston Univer- 
sity. After April 15. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cheyney will be in Honolulu 
where they will make their home. 


Brookline Social Crater 

The Grand ball room was the 
scene of a wedding reception on 
Sunday following the marriage 
of Miss Mary Byrne to Joseph 
Bongiorno. 

Phi Sigma Sigma, Boston Uni- 
versity, held a get-together with 
dinner on Monday. 

The Ladies of the Guild of 
Saint Francis and the Men’s club 
of Sacred Heart parish of Newton 
held a St. Valentine’s dinner 
dance on Tuesday in the Grand 
ball room. 

Tau Beta Beta sorority held 
their regular monthly meeting 
and tea on Tuesday In the Gold 
room. 

Young Republican Club of 
Brookline held a meeting with 
dinner on Wednesday at the Boa- 
consfleld. 


rauBy 

COChTAlLSDINNERj 

assr 

OPEN FROM 5RM.: SUNDAY I PM 
MUSIC BY MUZAK <Z5 



'731 BEACON STREET JR 


Flanagan - Coty 

White flowers and Woodwardia 
fern decorated the First Uni- 
tarian Society in Newton. West 
Newton, on February 15th, for 
the marriage of Miss Ethel Ade- 
line Coty and Carroll Glenn Flan- 
agan, son of Mrs. Beulah Flana- 
gan of Blytheville, Arkansas and 
Mr. William E. Flanagan of 
Corpus Chrlsti. Texas. The eight 
o'clock candlelight service was ' 
performed by the Rev. Herbert 
Kitchen, D.D. in a double ring 
ceremony. Southern smilax, pink 
snapdragon and carnations, with 
blue delphinium decorated the 
home of the bride’s mother. Mrs. 
Woods Coty of 99 Highland 
street. West Newton, for the re- 
ception. 

The bride wore a period style 
gown of ivory brocaded satin 
styled with a hoopskirt and 
bustle back on basque lines, with 
a sweetheart neckline trimmed 
with lace. Her full length Ivory 
veil of illusion was caught to a 
headdress of ostrich tips, and she 
carried a cascade of Eucharist 
lilies, stephanotis and an orchid. 
She was given in marriage by 
Mr. James Wallace Craig, of 
North Marshfield, a cousin of the 
bride's mother. Mrs. Edwrd T. 
Davis fShlcla Hitchen) of West 
Newton was the matron of honor 
and Miss Doris Louise Leschke j 
of West Hartford. Connecticut, i 
was the maid of honor. Mrs. j 
Davis wore a gown of blue bro- 
cade and Mlsa Leschke wore pink 1 
Their gowns were also styled on 
basque lines with yokes of mar ' 
quisette. They wore headdresses 
of ostrich tips with matching 
mitts and carried fans of pink 
carnations and blue delphinium. 
The bridesmaids, three In pink 
and three irvblue, wearing similar 
gowns and accessories and also' 
carrying fans were Miss Mariory 
Plummer of Sfnneham Miss Tsa- 
hollo Rovce of East .Taffrev. Now 
Hampshire, Miss Lu Hitchen. ! 
Miss Barbara Ann Smith and : 
Miss Jean Worth, all of West I 
Newton, and Mrs. John W. Read- 
ing fAnne Weston' of Boston. 
Mrs. Cotv was gowned in Ameri- 
can beauty rose velvet, com pi l- ' 
mentod by a headdress of two- 
toned roses on a matching cap, 
gloves of eggshell and her flow- 
ers were Eucharist lilies. 

Russell Carter, of West Somrr- 
, ville, was the host man and the 
ushers included Albert Louns- 
bury of Everett. Clarence Hans- 
berrv of Waltham. John Devine 
of Hyde Park. Lt. Edward T 
Davis. William Hudson. Warren 
Young and Wendell F. Smith. .Jr., 
all of West Newton. William El- 
lis Weston, of Boston, was the 
organist. The bride sang a group 
of love songs at the reception 
where a trio furnished the music. 

Mrs. Flanagan Is a graduate of 
House In the Pines. Mr. Flana- 
gan received his discharge from 
the Navy last fall. Following a 
wedding trip to New Hampshire 
Mr and Mrs Flanagan will make 
their homo temnorarilv at 99 
l Highland street, West Newton. 


Burt - Webster 

— o— 

Mr. and Mrs. Otis P. Thack- 
ston of 49 Charlbmont street, 
Newton Highlands and Sarasota. 
Florida, announce the marriage 
of their daughter, Martin T. 
Webster to Kenneth C. Burt, son 
of Mrs. E. B. Heed of Miami. 
Florida. 

Miss Blanche Webster, of Or- 
lando. Florida, was the bride’s 
attendant at the ceremony 
which took place on January 26 
in the patio of the First Pres- 
byterian Church in Sarsota. The 
Rev. B. L. Bowman performed 
the sendee. 

Gardner - Lopas 

— o — 

A reception at the Hotel Bea- 
consfleld. Brookline, followed the 
marriage of Miss Margaret Mary 
Lopas and Lt. William Everett 
Gardner. A. U. S.. which took 
place in St. Bernard’s Church. 
West Newton on Saturday. Feb- : 
ruary 16. The nine o'clock. I 
double ring ceremony was per- 
formed by the Rev. Francis -M. 
Falsey of the Church of Our Lady 
of Sorrow. Hartford. Connecti 
cut. a cousin of the bride. 

The bride's gown of white 
satin was styled with a net yoke, 
fltted bodice and full skirt. Her, 
fingertip veil was caught to a 
coronet of white satin and she 
carried white orchids. Her thro" 
sisters. Miss Catherine G. Lopas. 
Mrs. Anne Gailunas and Miss 
Veronica Lopas. were the at- 
tendants. They wore gowns of 
chenille and nylon taffeta and> 
carried roses. 

John J. Lopas. brother of the \ 
bride, was the best man and J 
the ushers were Captain John 
Burke of Springfield and Her- 
bert Gardner of Maine. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. John Lopas of 4 Edgewood 1 
road. West Newton and the 
groom is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lyle Grant Gardner of 
Ashland. Lt. and Mrs. Gardner 
will live in Belmont, after Feb- 
ruary 25. when they return from 
a trip to Lake Placid. New York. 

Gardner - Woodward 

— o — 

Miss Eloise Cleveland Wood- 
ward and Frank Hale Gardner, 
son of Mrs. Marjorie Hale Gard- 
ner of 127 Homer street. New- 
| ton Centre, were married on 
I February 14 in St. Mary of the 
Harbor Episcopal Church. Prov- 
rincctown. White lilies and spring 
! flowers decorated the church for 
the two o’clock ceremony per- 
formed by the Rev. Stanley War- 
ren Ellis of Wahan and the Rev. 
William L. Bailey of Province- 
town. A reception followed at 
the homo of the bride’s parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Cleveland Landon 
Woodward of Truro. 

The bride wore her grand- 
mother's gown of white satin 
brocade and rosepoint lace. She 
' carried an old fashioned bouquet 
of stephanotis and lilies of the 
valley. Miss Nancy Crawford of 
Edgewood, New Jersey, was the 
maid of honor. Miss Crawford 
wore white and carried a heart- 
shaped bouquet. 

Robert Fuller Gardner of New- 
ton Centre and Truro was the 
best man for His brother and 
the ushers were Ralph Crosby 
Woodward of Truro and Ralph 
W. Crosby of Rumford, Rhode 
Island. 

Thn bride was graduated from 
St Mary’s Hall School ( Epis- 
copal i in Burlington. New Jersey 
and the Cambridge Hospital 
School of Nursing. The groom 
was graduated from Browne and 
Nichols School in Cambridge and 
the Dublin. New Hampshire 
School. Mr. and Mrs. Gardner 
will live in Boston. 

JMEW CITIZENS 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren L. Hu- 
ston of 63 Otis street. Newton- 
ville, announce the birth o$ a 
daughter on February 19 at the 
Newton- Wellesley Hospital. They 
have another daughter. Barbara, 
age four. 

Grandparents are Mrs. W. B. 
Farnsworth of Springfield and 
Mr. and Mrs. Llewellyn E. Hu- 
ston of Court street. Newton- 
ville. 

— o — 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Francis 
Benoit of 97 Morton street. New- 
ton Centre announce the birth of 
a daughter, Catherine, on Febru- 
ary 15 at the Newton-Wellesley 

Ml. 

Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Park N. Condi t of Newton Cen- 
tre and Mr. and Mrs. Alex J. 
Benoit of Newton. 

— o — 

A daughter, Marilyn, was born 
at Newton-Wellesley Hospital, 
Newton Lower Falls, on Friday. 
February 15th, to Mr. and Mrs 
James M. Mosely, 35 Richards 
road, Watertown, and Waban. 
Her father is president of Mosely 
Selective List Service. Boston, 
and her mother, a former art 
supervisor, recently was a cadet 

nurse at thi ho pital 

She is tiu- granddaughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. Edward P. Star bird. 
Dorchester, and th<* late Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur C. Mosely of West- 
field. 

o 

A Michigan service • station 
operator, retailing a diversified 
line of merchandise, sells soap, 
which in the past four years has 
increased to 50 per cent of his 
1 total sales. 


ENGAGEMENT^ 

Mr. Weston B. Haskell of 
West Newton announces the en- 
gagement of his daughter, Miss 
Helena Zoe Haskell to Robert 
Pennlman Marsh Jr., of Brook; 
line, son of Mrs. Robert P. 
Marsh of Springfield, and the 
late Mr. Marsh, 


CHURCHES 


RECENT DEATHS 


COMMUNITY CHURCH 
OF BOSTON 

— o — ■ 

"Planning for Jobs, Security, 
and Freedom" will be the sub- 
ject of the address to be given 
by Dr. J. Raymond Walsh at the 
Miss Haskell, daughter of the , morning service of the Commun- 
late Pauline Derby Haskell, at- ity Church of Boston at Jordan 
tended Dana Hall. Connecticut 1 Halli Sunday, Feh. 24th. at 10:30 
Collate for Woman, and the _ ‘ . „ h n . 

Katharina Gibbs School. a Dn Walsh 15 R "' rBrch D1 ' ; 

Mr. Marsh recently returned rec * or °f the C.I.O. and has been | 
from serving three years over- j loaned by the National Office to 
seas in the Mediterranean area the Political Action Committee, 
as a capta in in the U . S. Army, j He has spo g on over national 


Mr. and Mrs. Stanley F. Walden 
, of Greenville, Maine, formerly of 
i Newtonville, announce the on- 
J gagement of their daughter, Miss 
Winifred Walden to Lt. Charles 
F. Hill, USNR, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Philip A. Hill of Chicago. 

Miss Walden was graduated 
| from Wheaton College. Lt. Hill 


radio networks under the aus- 
pices of the Town Meeting of the 
Air. His most recent participa- 
tion was on Jan. 24th. 

For seven years Dr. Walsh was 
a member of the Economic Fac- 
ulty at Harvard and he also j 
taught at Williams College. 
While at Harvard he was Prcsi 


was graduated from Armour Col- dent of thp Ten cher 3 ' Union, 
lege of Engineering of the Illinois Consultant to the Federal Re- 
Inshtute of Technology. ser ve Board, the National • Re- 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Gor- sources Committee on Social Sc- 
rfian of 41 Gardner street. New- curity, he served for a year a3 
ton. announce the engagement of Trial Examiner of the National 
their daughter. Miss Duane E. j Labor Relations Board. 

Gorman to Richard C. Schluter, Widely known as the author 
son of Mr. and Mrs. August C. ; of "CIO — Industrial Unionism in 
Schulter of 26 Whlttemore road, j Action", he collaborated with 
Newton. other scholars In the Taussig 

Mr. Schluter. who served as a memorial volume, "Expl i ations 
Lieutenant, was recently dis- : in Economics". He conV'ibutes 
charged from the Army Air ' to the New Republic, The Nation, 
Forces following three years of the Survey Graphic and the 
service. Quarterly Journal of Economics. 

Mrs. A. L. Cormay of 29 
Charles street. Auburndale. an- 
nounces the engagement of her 
daughter, Miss Doris M. Cormay 
to Clayton Hall Eamcs, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Eames of 
Worcester. 

Miss Cormay was graduated 
from the Newton High School, 
the Paramount School of Dancing 
and Bryant fr Stratton Business 
School. Mr. Eames was gradu- 
ated from the Worcester High 


School. 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Jump 


CENTRAL CONG. CHURCH 
OF NEWTON 

Newtonville 

Rev. Randolph Seaman Merrill 
Minister 

Mrs. Robert L. Monroe, 
Director of Education 
Sunday, February 24 

9:30 a. m., Church School. 

10:50 a. m., Morning Worship 
with sermon by Rev. Raymond 
Calkins, D. D., Minister Emeritus, 
The First Church, Congregation- 
al. Cambridge. 

5:00-7:00 p.m. Junior High So- 


»n„™.nl C Th. hlre r ° ad ' an ; wil > hold lts regular month 

announce the engagement of 

their daughter, Miss Marcia 


Elizabeth Jump to Nathaniel 
Woodbury Currier, Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Wood- 
bury Currier of Amosbury. 

Miss Jump, who is a graduate 
of Buffalo Seminary. Syracuse 
j University, and the New Eng- 
land Conservatory of Music, is 
1 flow a violinist in the St. Louis 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Mr. Currier is a graduate of 
Dean Academy and attended the 
i New England Conservatory ot 
Music. He is now a member of 
j the orchestra of the New York 
Metropolitan Opera Company. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry S. Cross- 
man of 11 Mandalay road, New- 
ton Centre announce the engage- 
! ment of their daughter. Miss 
Phyllis Bernice Crossman to 
George G. Goldberg, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank C. Goldberg of 
Brookline. 

Mr. Goldberg was recently dis- 
, charged from the Army Air 
i Forces after serving in Europe 
| more than two years. 


ly meeting. Bring your own sup- 
per. 

7:00 p. m., The Young People’s 
Society will use their meeting 
to pack overseas cartons for the 
"American Youth for European 
Youth" movement. 


Dr. Park to Speak 
At Second Church, 
W. Newton, Feb, 27 


THE FIRST CHURCH OF 
CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

“Mind” is the subject of the 
Lesson-Sermon to be read in The 
Mother Church, The First Church 
of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, 
Massachusetts, and in all of its 
branches, on Sunday. February 
24. 

The Golden Text, "Teach me, O 
Lord, the way of Thy statutes; 

. . . Give me understanding, and 
I shall keep Thy law” is from 
Psalms 119:33.34. Other Bible ci- 
tations include, "The prepara- 
tions of the heart in man, and 
the answer of the tongue, is from 
the Lord. . . . Commit thy works 
unto the Lord, and thy thoughts 
shall be established" (Proverbs 
16:1,3). 

The Lesson-Sermon also in- 
cludes the following passages 
from the Christian Science text- 
hook, "Science and Health with 
Key to the Scriptures" by Mary 
Baker Eddy, "Hold thought stead- 
fastly to the enduring, the good, 
and the true, and you will bring 
these into your experience pro- 
portionably to their occupancy of 
your thoughts . . . When mortal 
man blends his thoughts of exis- 
tence with the spiritual and 


DJI. J. HERBERT YOUNG 

Dr. J. Herbert Young, who re- 
retired from practice in 1941, 
died on monday, February 18, at 
his home. 223 Park Street, New- 
ton. 

Dr. Young was In his 64th 
year. He was born In Amesbury, 
the son of Dr. Benjamin H. and 
Harriet (Cheney) Herbert He 
was graduated from Phillips 
Exeter Academy. Harvard Col- 
lege and Harvard Medical 
School. He interned at the 
Massachusetts General Hospital, 
Boston Floating Hospital and the 
Children’s Hospital; was a dip- 
lomat of the American Board of 
Pediatrics, and a member of the 
American Medical Association, 
the New England Pediatric As- 
sociation and the Massachusetts 
Medical Society. 

From 1910 until he retired he 
practiced at 330 Dartmouth 
street, Boston and was a con- 
sultant in pediatrics at the Mass- 
achusetts Eye and Ear Infirm- 
ary and the New England Bap- 
tist Hospital, physician to the 
Children’s Medical Service of the 
Massachusetts General Hospital 
and physician and chief of de- 
partment of the Cambridge Hos- 
pital. 

He • is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Irene (Hamilton) Young, 
a son, Hamilton Young of Chest- 
nut Hill and a daughter, Mrs. 
David W. Williams of Boston. 

Funeral services were held this 
afternoon at 2:30 in ,the Bigelow 
Chapel, Mount Auburn Ceme- 
tery, Cambridge. 

FRANK D. MURDOCK 

Funeral services for rrank D. 
Murdock, husband of Eva 
(Ward) Murdock were held Fri- 
day morning from the Doherty 
Chapel, 327 Watertown street, 
Newton. A high mass of re- 
quiem was celebrated in the 
Church of Our Lady, Newton by 
Rev. Daniel J. Taglino. Burial 
was in Calvary Cemetery. Wal- 
tham with prayers by Fr. Tag- 
lino. 

Mr. Murdock, a former resi- 
dent of Newton, died on Mon- 
day. February 11, in a Boston 
hospital following a brief illness. 
He was born in Valley Farm, 
Conn., the son of William and 
Catherine (Cassidy' Murdock. 
Before moving to Waltham two 
years ago he had resided In New- 
ton for more than 30 years. 

Besides his wife he is survived 
by three daughters, Mrs. John 
Miller of Hartford, Conn., Mrs. 
Morton Dickey of Newtonville 
and Mrs. Olive Feuchtinger of 
Waltham, a son James Murdock 
of Waltham and two brothers 
David of Waltham and William 
Murdock of Watertown. 


JOSEPH C. FULLER 

— o — 

Funeral services for Joseph 
Cheever Fuller, vice-president of 
the Northern Industrial Chemi- 
cal Company, were held Tuesday 
afternoon at 3:15 In the Second 
Church In Newton, West New- 
i ton. Dr. R. Clyde Yarbrough of- 
i fleiated with Mr. Clendenning 
! Smith at the organ. Burial will 
be In the Newton Cemetery. 

Mr. Fuller died on Saturday, 
February 16. He was in his 57th 
year and was born In West New- 
ton, the son of J. Cheever and 
Mary (Symonds) Fuller. He was 
graduated from Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology in 1911 
and was a member of Delta Kap- 
pa Epsilon fraternity. For many 
years he was active in the work 
of Norumbega Council, Boy 
Scouts of America. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Ruth (Brodhead) Fuller, 
two sons, Garrett B. Fuller of 
West Newton and David R. Ful- 
ler, U. S. Navy, also by two 
brothers, George S. Fuller of 
West Newton and Alfred E. Ful- 
ler of Newtonville. 


Dr. J. Edgar Park. President 
; Emeritus of Wheaton College, 
and minister of The Second 
Church in Newton from 1907 to 
1926. will speak Wednesday. Feb- 
ruary 27. at 8 p.m. in the main | works only as God works, he wi 
1 church under the sponsorship of; no longer grope in the dark and 
the Altar Guild. Dr. Park,! cling to earth because he has not 
through whose vision and lead- tasted heaven (pp. 261, 263). 

ership this beautiful Gothic o 

church was built in 1916, wisely 
incorporated in it many religious 
symbols and beautiful aids to 
i worship. Ho is eminently quali- 
fled, therefore, to speak helpful- 


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
Newton Centre 

Rev. Charles N. Arbuckle, D.D. 

Rev. E. Spencer Parsons 
Worship Service, 11:00 a.m.; 
l.v on the subject, "Religious Sermon by Dr. Arbuckle, Sub- 
Symholism." Everyone is cordial- ject, "The Soul’s Approach to 
ly Invited to attend this inspira God.” Church School, 9:45 a.m. 
tional meeting. 


Mather Class Forum. 9:45 a.m.; 
Leader, Dr. Kirtley F. Mather. 

NEWTON CORNER 

METHODIST CHURCH THE ELIOT CHURCH 

Everett L. Farnsworth, .41 inis ter 1 OF NEWTON 

Laymans Sunday Service of Or. Ray A. Eusden, .Minister 
Public Worship at 10:30 A. M. Sunday — 9:30, Primary and 

Guest speaker, Dr. Carl S. Ell, Junior Departments of the 
President of Northeastern Uni- ! Church School, 10:45, Morning 
! versity, Subject of sermon ad- Service of Worship with sermon 
dress, "A Living Faith.” Church by Dean Vaughan Dabney. 10:45, 
School for Bible Study at 11:50 Nursery and Kindergarten De- 
A. M. Youth Fellowship Group partments of the Church School, 
at 6:45 P. M. Young Married 12:05, Young People’s Division. 
Couples Club at 8 o’clock. A pro- Junior High, High School, and 
gram of movies. Social and re- Eliot Round Table. Rabbi Leo 
freshments. Trepp, formerly of Germany and 

now Rabbi of Temple B’nai Brith, 
Official Board Meeting of the Somerville, will speak on "One 
Newton Corner Methodist Church God, One Brotherhool.” The lead- 
will be held in the church par- ers will be Elinor Airth and 
lors, Monday night at 8 o'clock. Betty Ann Finnello 6:30, Four- 
I Fold Club meeting at the Church. 
Tin Otyokwa Class of the New- Two motion picture Mims, "The 
ton Coiner Methodist Church Negro Soldier” and "Wealth of 
will hold their February meeting the Andes,” will he shown. Re- 
in the Trowbridge Room, Tues- freshments and a social period 
•lay night at 8 o'clock. Hostesses, will follow in the Club Room. 
Mrs McFarland, Mrs. McPhee Monday — 10 : 00-4 .00, Rod Cross 

and Mrs. A. T. Cass. Sewing Unit. 

Tuesday 10:00-0:30, Institute 
The Good Will Circlo of the on Audio-Visual Aids held at Old 
Newton Corner Methodist Church South Church, 
will meet Tuesday afternoon at Wednesday — 9:00-5:00, Contin- 

1:30 in the Trowbridge Room. nation of Institute on Audio- 

Visual Aids. 3:30, Junior* Choir 

The Annual Family Night pro- rehearsal. 5:00, Junior High Choir 
gram of the Mens Club of the rehearsal. 7:30, Church Choir re- 
Newton Corner Methodist Church hcarsal. 

will be held Thursday night at Friday 8:00 P. M... Pilgrim 
7:45, in tin- church vestries. Hon. Hall Meeting. Dr. Eddy Aslrva- 
Edwin O. Childs will be the guest than) will speak on "The Chris- 
sprain i Refreshments will he tian Task in India” and Dr. Her- 
served and a social hour will bert Gezork will speak on "The 
l follow the address. | Christian Task in Germany." 


Memorial Service 
For Geo. D. Haigh 

A memorial service was held 
Sunday evening at 8 o'clock in 
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 
Newton Highlands for George 
D. Haigh, aviation machinist's 
mate, second class, U. S. -N., son 
of Mr. and Mrs* George H. Haigh 
of 24 Roland street, Newton 
Highlands. 

A graduate of the Newton 
High School in 1939, Haigh en- 
listed in the Navy four years 
ago. He was a member of the 
Naval Air Corps Torpedo Squad- 
ron 5 of the Carrier Yorktown 
and was first reported missing 
in action on January 29, 1944 
when his plane which was last 
seen five miles from the carrier 
is presumed to have been lost in 
a storm over the Marshall Is- 
lands while the carrier was en- 
gaged in a r^id on Maleop Atoll. 

His brother, Edward A. Haigh. 
is a member of the Merchant 
Marine. 

Reception for 
Mr. and Mrs. Nystrup 

Mr. and Mrs. Albion M. De- 
Long of 27 Hickory Cliff road, 
Elliot Heights, Newton Upper 
Falls, held a wedding reception 
at their home on February 15, 
in honor of Mrs. DeLong's daugh- 
ter and husband. Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter L. Nystrup. 

Mrs. Nystrup, formerly M. 
Dorothy Galvin was married in 
August 30, at Marysville, Calif- 
ornia to Corporal Walter N. Ny- 
strup, USA,‘ son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Nystrup of Weathersfield. 
Conn. Cpl. Nystrup has received 
his honorable discharge after 
serving with the Army of Oc- 
cupation In Manila. 

The home was decorated with 
American Beauty roses and mix- 
ed spring flowers. The dining 
room table had a center piece of 
white sweet peas and two white 
wedding rings between white 
candles, arranged by Mrs. Thorn 
as Jess of White Pine road. The 
happy couple received many 
beautiful and useful gifts from 
their friends and neighbors on 

Billot mu. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nystrup left 
Sunday for Weathersfield, Conn., 
where they will reside following 
a wedding trip to New York. 


COL. FRANK B. STEVENS 

— o — 

I Col. Frank B. Stevens, well 
| known advertising and news- 
paperman, died Sunday, Febru- 
ary 17, at his home, 20 Park 
Place, Newtonville. He was in his 
86th year. 

He was born in Dover. N. H., on 
Feb. 28, 1861, and graduated 
from Exeter Academy in 1879 
and from Yale University in 1884. 
While at Yale he was editor of 
the Yale Critic and Yale Ban- 
ner. He entered the newspaper 
field when he went to work for 
the Troy Telegram of which he 
became editor. Later he came to 
Boston and worked on the night 
news desk of the Boston Globe 
until he was transferred to the 
reportorial force. While in this 
latter position he made a re- 
markable hit with one of the 
Globe’s advertisers and a few 
months later entered the adver- 
tising business. 

As head of the Frank B. 
Stevens Advertising Company 
with offices in the Globe Build- 
ing he attracted country-wide at- 
tention for his unusual advertis- 
ing ideas. The company was later 
combined with the Van Clove 
Advertising Agency of New York, 
j In the meantime Col. Stevens 
j had become part owner of the 
' Boston Journal and the Boston 
Evening Record, and for six 
years was business manager of 
the Boston Herald under E. B. 
Haskell. Col. Stevens acquired his 
military title through appoint- 
ment to the staff of Gov. Roger 
Wolcott in 1893. 

In 1891 Co. Stevens was mar- 
ried to Mary Priscilla Sears, and 
two children, a son and daugh- 
ter were born to them. Only the 
son, Frank B. Stevens, Jr. of 
Washington. D. C. survives. In 
1935 Col. Stevens married Car- 
lotta Brandt of Boston who sur- 
vives him. He is also survived 
by a brother, Herman W. Ste- 
vens. 

Funeral services were held at 
his homo Wednesday afternoon 
at 2:30. Rev. Hamilton Gifford 
of the Newtonville Methodist 
Church officiated. Burial was in 
the Newtoh Cemetery. 


MAX STARR 

— o — 

Funeral services for Max 
Starr, of 142 Hobart road, Chest- 
nut Hill, founder and president 
of the Boston Show Case Com- 
pany, were held Monday morn- 
ing at Temple Mishkan Teflla, 
Roxbury, at 11 o’clock. Burial 
was in Mjshkan Tefila Cemetery, 
West Roxbury. 

Mr. Starr died on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 17. at his home following 
a long illness. He was in his 
57th year. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Sarah (Paretsky) Starr 
and four sons, Milton, Erwin, 
Leonard A., and Jason Starr^ 

DR. THEODORE F. KLEIN 

— o — 

Dr. Theodore F. Klein of 19 
Whittier road, Newtonville, dean 
of the Massachusetts School of 
Optometry, died on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 15. 

Dr. Klein was in his 68th year* 
He was the founder of the Massac 
chusetts Optometric Clinic which 
opened in Boston in 1941. He was 
a member of the American 
Optometric Association, thd 
Massachusetts Society of Opto* 
metrists and the New England 
Council of Optometrists. He also 
was a fellow of the Distinguished 
Service Foundation in Optometry. 
The Massachusetts School of 
Optometry was founded by his 
father in 1895. 

He is survived by his wife. Mrs. 
Gertrude (MacDonald) Klein, 
three daughters, Miss Theodora 
and Miss Barbara Klein, and 
Mrs. Lewis fi. Huntington, and a 
brother, Herman L. Klein. 

Funeral services were held 
Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at 
the Mann & Mann Funeral Home, 
Jamaica Plain. Burial was in thd 
Newton Cemetery. 


DEATHS 


CLARK — On Feb. 15 at Newton 
Highlands, Eleanor Sigourney 
Clark of 320 Lake Avenue. 

FULLER— On Feb. 16 at West 
Newton, Joseph Cheever Fuller, 
husband of Ruth ( Brodhead X 
Fuller, of 33 Foundtain Street, 

GORNEY— On Feb. 18 at Chest* 
nut Hill. Ellis Gorney, husband 
of Hattie (Zonn) Gorney, of 
125 Ward Street. 

KLEIN— On Feb. 15 at Newton- 
ville, Dr. Theodore Frederick 
Klein, husband of Gertrude 
i MacDonald) Klein, of 19 Whit* 
tier Road. 

MALONEY— On Feb. 20 at West 
Newton, Margaret A. (Ryan), 
Maloney, widow of Michael H. 
Maloney, of 250 River Street. 

MEEKER— On Feb. 21 at West 
Newton, Esther K. Meeker, wife 
of Charles H. Meeker of 20 
Adella Avenue. Funeral serv* 
ices Saturday. Fob. 23 at 4 P. 
M., in the Newton Cemetery 
Chapel. 

MURDOCK— On Feb. 11 at Bos* 
ton. Frank D. Murdock, hus* 
band of Eva (Ward) Murdock, 
formerly of Newton. 

POWERS On Feb. 20 at Chest* 
nut Hill, Henry A. Powers of 
66 Commonwealth Avenue. 

STARR— On Feb. 17 at Newton 
Centre, Max Starr, husband of 
Sarah ( Paretsky) Starr, of 142 
Hobart Road. 

STEVENS -On Feb. 18 at New- 
tonville. Frank Stevens, hus- 
band of Carlotta (Brant) 
Stevens, of 20 Park Place. 


CATE 

Mineral Service 


Distinctive Flower 
Arrangements for Funerals 

K. O. MAQNUSON 

Florin! 

2020 Commonwealth Avenue 
Auburndale - Tel. LAS 0215 

Serving Thin Community 
Since 1861 

TeL BIG. 0170 ! 

1251 Washington St. 

West Newton 

MRS. GEORGE P. Fl.OOD 

PAUL R. FITZGERALD 

Res Embalmer 

JOHN 

FLOOD 

FUNERAL 

DIRECTOR 

T*L LA Ball 01 M 

>47 Wa-hlniton St.. Nawtas 


AX-RFILINOEFI -V.P. MACKAV ' 


Years of training and experience have enabled this 
organization to capably direct funeral services 
which meet the highest tradition of the profession. 

Rich f^|^Bellinger 

SUCCESSORS TO BURT M. RICH > ^ 

26-30 CENTRE AVE.- NEWTON, MASS. 

usu f f * 


SAY IT 

mm 


Flowers 


from 

Eastman's 

FLOWER SHOPS 


Ncwronvillo 
BIG 6781 


Wolloilov Hill* 
Wll 4440 


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mmiq Mg-uo^ 





PAGE riVE 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY. 21. 1946 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


Mrs. Brown- 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Mrs. Matt Jones, Jr., Mrs. Joseph 
H. Jamieson, Mrs. Richard L. Ken- 
ney, Mrs. Horace Kidgor, Mrs. 
Thomas H. Lanman, Mrs. Rich- 
ard H. Lee, Miss Caroline Lovett, 1 
Mrs. C. Russell Mason, Mrs. E. ' 
K. Mentzer, Mrs. Elmore I. Mac- ! 
Phie, Mrs. L. H. Marshall, Mrs. 
Elmer Pllsbury, Mrs. Henry S. I 
Plimpton, Mrs. Wm. A. Phil- 
crantz, Mrs. Duncan A. Reid, Miss 
Mabel L. Riley, Mrs. Leverett 
Saltonstall, Mrs. Frank P. Scho- 
field, Mrs. Charles E. Spencer, 
Jr., Mrs. Leslie P. Thompson, Mrs. 
Samuel F. Tower, Mrs. Clinton 



Dining With Jane and Bill 


Jane, thanks to you, we’re pretty good 


Bill — You know 
breakfast eaters. 

Jane — What do you mean, Bill? 

Bill — Well, yesterday at the office we lmd a discussion about 
breakfast. The number of men who don’t eat any breakfast is 
W. Tylee, Mrs. Phillipo L. War- 1 really surprising. 


Jane — A lot of us housewives skip breakfast, too. Then 
we nibble all morning. That’s why we get fat, you know. But 
why did you men discuss “breakfast”? 

Bill — Most of the fellows in our office go out about 9:30 
or 10:00 o’clock to get a cup of coffee, so yesterday we decided 


ren, Mrs. George W. Wyman, Mrs. 

Joseph F. Wogan, Mrs. Quincy 
W. Wales, Mrs. Chas. J. A. Wil- 
son, and Mrs. Worthing West. 

Reports of chairmen of Com- 
mittees indicated that the work , 
of the women connected with the asE w ' , y 
District Nursing Association Jane — Yes? 

plays an important part in the Bill — Some said they didn't eat any breakfast, and some 

life of the community and Miss , said they only had toast and coffee. All of them said they were 
hungry by the middle of the morning and needed a cup of coffee 
to “pick them up.” 

Jane — Did you tell them what you cat for breakfast? 

Bill — Those of us who eat, breakfast regularly told them 
what a good breakfast is and how much it helps out through 
the morning. We suggested they try it. 

Jane — What did they say to that? 

Bill — I think they were impressed. We ought to get some 
converts. 

Note — A good breakfast contains citrus fruit, whole grain 
cereal or egg, toast, butter or fortified oleo, and coffee. 

Newton Nutrition Center, 

1357 Washington Street, West Newton. BIG. 4911. 
Citizens are welcome to come in for food and budget in- 
ky the doctor, and was instructed f ormat j on on Wednesday? from 10 to 12 a.m 

in the part he had to play as a r 

good sport. 

With the help of the doctor, 
district nurse, visiting teacher 
and his mother he finally gained 
his health without any serious 
heart complication even though 
It meant months in bed. 


Hilga S. Nelson, executive di- 
rector emphasized the fact, that 
none of the patients have suf- 
fered for want of care due to 
the acute nursing shortages. 

A most illuminating film 
"Jimmy Beats Rheumatic Fever” 
was shown to indicate the need 
for greater knowledge in respect 
to this dread disease of children. 
Jimmy had had a bad sore throat 
and In a few days developed 
swelling with pain in one knee 
and considerable temperature. 
He was immediately put to bed 


Dr. Hitchen- 

(Continued from Page /) 
May Eliot, president of the 
American Unitarian Association, 
gave the invocation. The meet- 
Since rheumatic fever and j n g was preceded by an organ re- 


heart disease has a higher 
death rate among young children 
than any other disease, it be- 
hooves us not to overlook the 
seriousness of acute infections 
of the nose, throat or ears and 
seek medical supervision early. 


Mayor - 

( Continued from Page 1) 


cital by William Ellis Weston. 

Dr. Hitchen emphasized a 
growing secularism among Brit- 
ish people that he observed on 
his first trip back to his native 
England, since before the war, as 
well as the adamant attitude of 
the British Council of Churches 
against the admission of liberal 

and free church groups to its i "ision is’ to 'be~made‘ by the au- 
council, in its ecumenical pro- dlence as to which one is best 
gram. As a result of their ex- ■ thoy rea , izc thcy must oach fee 
new city engineer as compared perlences in the war, he was told : g00c j. Originality of presents 
with the former salary of $4,500. by the council, the tendency now, i tloni costume or anything amus- 
The budget requests are in ad- is not to strengthen the heart of lllg to put over the barber shop 

*" »*<""•= .lreeriv i quartet idca Qf th( , gay n [ net ,^ 


have had in his development, 
but because thoy feel he meas- 
ures up in every respect to the 
long list of talented artists the 
Club has presented to their 
sponsoring members. The Club 
feels sure that the music loving 
public in Newton will be 
proud as they are to welcome 
one of our own Newton boys as 
an accomplished artist, 

Finally as a novelty and espe- 
cially for those who long for the 
"Gay Nineties,” there is to be 
a contest of three quartets pick- 
ed from the Club. There will be 
great rivalry and since the de- 


dition to appropriations already Christianity, but to strengthen 
made, aggregating $434,155, the shell and not the core, the 
which includes $380,000 for the institutions of the church rather 
15 per cent bonus for all city than the free spirit. The idea that 
employees. The budget recom- .it is the heart of Christianity 
mended by the mayor for the that matters is now considered 
Water Departnu|it, which is seg- all wrong. 

regated from the other depart- With the globe squeezed to- 
ment figures, was $367,858, in ad- gether, making the distance 
dition to $24,373 already appro- from Great Britain not 3000 
printed thus far this year. j miles but 15 flying hours away, 


The budget figures were re- 
ferred to the finance committee 
for study. 

The Mayor's appointment of 
Willard S. Pratt, as city engineer 
was confirmed by the board at 
Monday night’s meeting. Action 
was again deferred on confirma- 
tion of the appointment of Harold 
F. Young as street commissioner, 
the appointment being held in 


"geographically we are one 
world, to use the phrase crystal- 
ized by and to the Immortal 
memory of Wendell Willkie. But 
unless spiritually, intellectually 
and understandingly, we can 
cross those 3000 miles to reach 
the hearts and minds and feel as 
close as we do to New Hamp- 
shire, there will be no world at 
all. It is up to us to help in 


committee to come up at the next spreading that understanding.” 
meeting of the Board. j "People are turning away from 

The Board confirmed the ap- ! traditional religion,” he said. Yet 
pointment of Alexander Standish despite war weariness and eco- 
as trustee of the Chaffin Fund nomic troubles, and a lowered 
and of George M. Lovejoy as a morale and physical resistance 
member of the Public Welfare caused by six years of under- 


Board. 

It was voted to reconsider the 
action taken at the last meeting 
at which the application of 
George McLaughlin and How- 
ard Kosroflan for a permit to 
operate four bowling alleys at 
1207 Chestnut Street, Newton 
Upper Falls was rejected by the 
board. The matter was referred 
back to the license committee. 


feeding and rationing of clothes 
now worn shabby even in the 
house of Lords, Dr. Hitchen paid 
tribute to the indomitable spirit 
and stickitability of the Birtish 


will be as important as the mu- 
sical qualities. Prizes wiH be 
given immediately after the con- 
test by the judges who will be 
swayed purely by the enthusiasm 
of the audience. It looks like a 
good time will be had by all 
except perhaps the men in the 
quartets who expect to take a 
terrible ribbing. 

Thus it looks like a resplen- 
dent musical evening for all 
tastes — glee club music by one 
of New England's outstanding 
male singing clubs, two piano 
groups by the soloist, Alan 
Booth, and a touch of the gay 
nineties by the quartets which 
should give a lot of amusement 
and pleasure to all those who 
don't want to be too serious. 

The Club gladly welcomes new 
sponsoring members, or single 
tickets for the concert on the 
19th of March may be bought at 
the door. Anyone wishing fur- 
ther information should write to 
Mr. Walter H. Sears, 27 Brooks 
avenue, Newtonville. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
-MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex ^. PROBATE COURT 
Stephen John Boylan. Donald H 
•• ' r Boylan. Richard E. 


people and their continued sense 'BH^ryTr 'Boyi^SJor^' 

of humor reflecting their inner EI !? a '> Pt 1 1 ' Boylan Sullivan, j. Don- 
neI Katherine A. Boylan 


courage. 

Despite published reports of 
war aamage, Dr. Hitchen was 
still shocked to see acre after 


The appliction of Kenneth J. acre leveled .in bomb-scarred 
Ridgway of 18 Bends Road, Ward London.. He spoke of the "Wilder- 
2, for two first class taxi licenses j ne ss around St. Paul’s Church” 
was rejected by the Board, also where once buildings and homes 
the application of Louis Peter had been, and all the evidences 
of Boston for a sound truck on still remaining of the "incredl- 
California Street, the application ble flaming hell” that the people 
of James A. Lowell and Lucy Q f London endured. Yet he was 
Lowell for the change of district “utterly amazed at the tidiness 
zoning boundaries from single Q f London.” Sixty per cent of 
residences and general residence Unitarian property in London 
to business district at Boylston was destroyed or damaged, he 


and Hammond street Chestnut 
Hill, was granted. 


STONE INSTITUTE and 
NEWTON HOME lor 
AGED PEOPLE 


This Homs Is sntlrelp aupportsd By 
ihs generosity oi Newton citizens and 
we solicit funds for endowment and 
enlargement jot the Home. 

DHUECTORB 
Mrs. Arthur M Allen 
Mrs. George W Harnett 
Mrs. Stanley Bolster 
Albert P Carter 
Mrs Albert P Carter 
William P. Chase 
Howard P Converse 
Marshall B Dalton 
Mrs. M. B. Dalton 
Mrs. James Dunlop 
Mrs. W V M Kawcett 
Mrs. Marjorie M Gardiner 
Mrs. Paul M Goddard 
Prank J Kale 
Mrs. W. E Harding 
Mrs Fred H. Hayward 
T. E. Jewell 
Seward W Jones 
Mrs. Arthur W Lana 
Robert >1. Loomis 
Mri. Elmore J MacPhle 
Donald D McKay 
Metcalf W Melcher 
Mrs M. W Melcher 
John E Peakes 
Mrs. John E Pcekoa 
Ueorgn E. Hawsou 
Mrs George E tiaweon 
William H. Klee 
Mrs. Prank L. tUrhardson 
Miss Mabel L Riley 
Mrs. Charles A. Sawln 
Mrs Charles L Smith 
Mrs. Oeorge S Smith 
Clifford H Wslker 
Thomas A. West 

METCALF W MELCHER. President 
147 Lske Ave . Newton Centre 
ROBKK1 H LOOM lb. Treasurer 
tuO forest Ave.. West Newton 


reported. 

There is need for the churches 
to recognize the needs of today. 
He deplored the fact that In 
Britain, "the land of the free,” 
where the Church of England 
is the state church and subsi- 
dized by the state, no minority 
religious voices as such 7 Uni- 
tarian, Quakers, spiritualists or 
others, can be heard over the 
British Broadcasting Company 
airwaves. 

o 

Gay Nineties 

( Continued from Page 1) 
audiences have heard before and 
which pleased them. 

The soloist is to he Alan Booth, 
a talented young pianist who the 
Club, through its Scholarship 
Fund, has assisted in carrying 
on his musical education at 
Obrrlln College. He is to grad- 
uate this spring and this will be 
his first opportunity to make a 
professional appearance in the 
East. Under Mr. Maclean's 
teaching and while a student at 
the Newton High School, young 
Bootli showed such decided tal- 
ent thut it was felt that with 
the proper training, he would 
develop into one of that grow- 
ing group of Negro artists who 
are rightfully taking their place 
in the cultural life of America. 
The Club is proud to present him. 
not only for the email part they 


nell Sullivan, 

Boylan Blrtwoll and David 
Blrtwell. all of Newton, in sal-1 
County, and Maty L. Boylan. of said 
Newton. Individually, and ns she Is 
administratrix of the estate of 
Stephen J. Him Inn. 
late of said Newton, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court by Daniel J. Boylan, 
praying that a specific performance 
of an agreement for the conveyance 
of an interest in real estate entered 
Into by Stephen J. Boylan late of 
Newton In .said County of Middlesex, 
deceased and said petitioner may ho 
decreed, and the administrator of the 
estate of said deceased be ordered 
to convey certain real property sit- 
uated In WInthrop tj 1 the County of 
Suffolk to said petitioner agreeably 
to the terms of said agreement. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file 1 written 
appearance In said court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on t lie twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary lOlfi. Hie return day of this 
cltntlon and also die an answer or 
other legal pleading within twenty- 
one days thereafter. 

Witness, John C. T.cggnt, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
first day of Kohruary in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and forty-six 
BORING F*. JORDAN, 

(N) f7-14-21 Register. 


First Church of 
Christ, Scientist 
of Newton 

391 Walnut Street 
Newtonville 

SERVICES 

Sunday 10:45 A.M 

Sunday School 10:45 A.M 

Wednesday Eveniner —.8:00 P.M 

READING ROOM 
287 Walnut St.. Newtonville 
Open Daily • All Welcome 

Weekdays, except Wodnee- 
daya and Holidays.... 9 to 9 

Wednesdays 9 to 7 :30 

Sundays and Holidays.... 2 to 5 

r r«« Lauding Library mciudaa (ha mbit 
iKlng Jama* vtralon), all (ha writing* 
of Mari Baker Eddy, and har auUion- 
tie blographlaa. 


Elks- 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Arthur L. Stevenson and John J. 
Donahue. Replacement 25-year 
buttons were given to Edwin O. 
Childs, George W. Johnson, Fred 

A. Cahill, Timothy Regan, Wil- 
liam F. McGrath, John W. House, 
James K. Cooney, Frank P. Man- 
ning, Frank P. Kneeland, Wil- 
liam Higgins, Albert T. Stuart 
and Clarence F. Hughes. 

Among the visiting guests were 
the following past exalted rulers: 

John P. Phalon of Watertown, 
George E. O'Connell of Fitchburg, 
Daniel March of Cambridge, 
David J. Alvah of Marlboro, John 

B. Sullivan of Lewiston, Me., 
John T. Whalen of Waltham, Wal- 
ter J. Rooney of Marlboro, Hu- 
bert B. Twohoy of Providence, 
R. I., Eugene E. Hearn of Phila- 
delphia, Penn., and Albert B. 
Blackman of Boston. Also a guest 
was Warrant Officer Stanley Col- 
ontuono, a Navy veteran of both 
World Wars and the holder of 
seven battle stars. 

Taking over the various offices 
were the following past exalted 
rulers of the lodge: Ernest J. 
Bleiler, exalter ruler; John J. 
Kecffe, esteemed leading knight; 
Matthew J. Hurley, esteemed 
loyal knight; Carl A. Eschelbach, 
esteemed lecturing knight; D. 
William Kearns, treasurer; Wil- 
liam N. Noone, tiler; Edwin O. 
Childs, chaplain; Robert B. Dris- 
coll, esquire; Thomas L. Ryan, 
organist; Hugh S. Boyd, inside 
guard, and Douglas Furbush, 
trustee. 

Initiated into membership were 
William P. Sullivan, William H. 
Rafferty, Frank J. Thibet and 
Clifford L. Perry. Reinstated 


wore Frank Generazzo, James P. 
Murphy and Gilbert Burns. Ac- 
cepted for membership were Ed- 
mund Gately, Donald W. Iyjgan, 
i Albert Minot Chandler and Alex- 
ander J. Chanson. Proposed for 
membership were John J. Glynn, 
John J. DelMonte, Peter War- 
nacek, and Robert T. Fitzgerald. 

Esteemed Leading Knight 
Nicholas Voducclo reported for 
the social and community wel- 
fare committee that plans were 
being completed for remodelling 
the home. He also told of the in- 
1 stallation of the fire alarm sys- 
tem by the lodge at the Newton 
Highlands Working Boys Home. 
Past Exalted Ruler Carl Eschel- 
bach reported for the inter-lodge' 
activity committee that Wake- 
field will be at Newton on March 
1, and Melrose will be there on 
March 7. Plans are being made 
for the annual inter-lodge ban- 
quet, he reported. 

Appointed a committee to pro- 
cure an honor roll plaque of mem- 
bers in the armed services in both 
World Wars were William E. 
Earle, chairman; Nicholas Veduc- 
cio, George Delaney, Martin E. 
Conroy and Wilfred Chagnon. 

Past Exalted Ruler John Phal- 
on of Watertown recited the 11 
o’clock "Toast.” A letter was read 
from Grand Exalted Ruler Wade 
H. Kepner urging subordinate 
lodges to assist in the housing 
problem. The lodge noted the 78th 
birthday of the organization 
which was founded on Feb. 16. 

Bernard T. Haffey is chairman 
of the committee arranging "Past 
Exalted Ruler Kecffe Night" in 
honor of John J. Keoffr for the 
meeting, on Feb. 28. The com- 
mittee also Includes D. W. 
Kearns, treasurer; William U. 
Fogwill, John F. Feeney, Mar- 


Eve. School- 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Dressmaking, tailoring, foods, 
rug making, jewelry, furniture 
repair, tray painting, knitting, 
slip covers, shorthand, typewrit- 
ing, salesmanship, small business 
organization, office machines, 
drafting, auto mechanics, and 
welding. 

The attendance for the first 
half of the term was most grati- 
fying and it is hoped that these 
pupils along with new members 
will enroll for the second half. 

This: division of the evening 
school into* two terms of eleven 
weeks each is a new procedure 
for Newton, and is being tried 
for the purpose of determining 
the advantages over a continu- 
ous term which has been the 
practice heretofore. 

These classes are free to resi- 
dents of Newton. For further 
information call Bigelow 2193. 


Synthetic oils have been devel- 
oped that will continue to flow at 
temperatures as low as 121 de- 
grees below zero. They are for 
use In airplane hydraulic systems. 

tin E. Conroy, Ernest J. Bleiler, 
Nicholas Veduccio, John Bibbo, 
Dan Foley, Mathew J. Hurley, E. 
Edwin Josselyn, John F. Cobb, 
Francis Lombardi, Frederick Jas- 
sett, Wallace McPherson, Joseph 
Plevack, Jeremiah J. Crowley, Ed- 
ward. F. Callahan, Joseph H. Jas- 
sett, David Cummings. Carl 
Eschelbach, Nicholas Bibbo. Pat- 
rick H. Donahue, William Hig- 
gins, George Delaney and Fred 
W. Burns. 


Federation- 

(Continued from Page J) 

President, Massachusetts State 
Federation Women’s Clubs. 
Greetings— Mrs. J. L. Blair Buck, 
First Vice-President General 
Federation of Women’s Clubs. 
Address- "Up to the Minute Leg- 
islation"— Hon. Arthur Coolidge, 
President Massachusetts Senate. 
Tv*> speakers on the Barnes Bill 

Clarence Barnes, Attorney Gen- 
eral. Gommon wealth of 'Massa- 
chusetts. Kenneth I. Taylor, Rep- 
resentative of A. F. of L. 

< Second Session '2:00 P. M.) 

1 Hotel Statler, February 27, 1346; 

Boston Herald-Traveler 

Master of Ceremonies— Neal 
O'Hara, Author of T. I. F. M., 
Columnist Herald Traveler, Ad- 
dress— “The Press as a Force in 
Current Affairs” — Ray Kierman, 
News Editor and Commentator, 
Boston Traveler. Music — Alice L. 
Farnsworth, soprano; Franklin 
G. Field, baritone; Harry Rogers, 
Accompanist. Address — "Post 
War Europe" — Catherine Coyne, 
< Just returned from Europe'. 

'Third Session )— 10:00 A. M.) 
'Shubert Theatre, February 28, 
1946.) 

Christian Science Monitor 

Address— "An Eye Witness in 
Central Europe.’ ’ — Joseph G. 
Harrison, Christian Science Moni- 
tor Rome Correspondent and Au- 
thority on South-Eastern and 
Central Europe. Address — 
China’s Future in a World Com- 
munity — Herbert Nichols, Chris- 
tian Science Monitor. Science 
Editor, just returned from China 
after five years as Capt. in U. 
S. Army, in charge of Press P.e- 


Newton Boys Score 
For Tilton School 

Robert. A Maltz, son of Mr. 
Benjamin Malt.z, 24 Quincy road. 
Chestnut Hill, and Mr. Marshall 
Reinstein, son of Mr. Walter 
Reinstein, 15 Crosby road, have 
recently been awarded by Tilton 
School, Tilton, N. H., special in* 
signia for their respective 
achievements In junior varsity 
football and soccer. 

o 

As a result of improved high- 
ways and motor transportation, 
attendance at county, farm meet- 
ings jumped from a total of 12 
million annually in 1920 to 46 
million in 1940. 


lations under General Acwede* 
meyer. Music — "Varsity Club 
Quartette,” Earic Weidner, pian- 
ist. Address— "Unfinished Busi- 
ness” — Erwin D. Canham, Radio 
Commentator q,nd Christian Scl« 
ence Editor. 

' Fourth Session) — • 2:00 P M.) 
'Shubert Theatre, February 28, 
1946. ) 

Boston Globe • 

Address — "The Situation in the 
Home” — Elizabeth Woodward, 
Boston Globe, Author of "Column 
for Teens.” Address — "The Situ- 
ation in the Nation "—Doris 
Fleeson. Washington Correspon- 
dent and Boston Globe Column- 
ist. Music — The Lewis Elliot 
Chorus.— Address— "The Situa- 
tion In the World" — Dorothy 
Thompson. Columnist on* World 
Affairs and Author. 


Health and Liberty ( 
are Priceless! 




THE PRICELESS HERITAGE OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE 


In this nation there are vital issues which transcend all partisan- 
ship. The American people have a Priceless Heritage. It is not 
shared by the people of any other nation. It belongs exclusively to 
the people of the United States. 

This inheritance sets the American people apart from all other 
peoples in the world. It has given us advantages so great that 
most minds fail to comprehend them. This heritage stems from a 
tradition and sensing of freedom which antedates by centuries 


the establishment of this nation and the adopting of its written 
Constitution. Its tangible expression is embodied in the Private 
Enterprise System. The essential to its preservation is the sanc- 
tity of the human personality — the supremacy of the individual 
and the subordination of the State. 

This priceless inheritance is now being dangerously menaced 
by moves to turn over to the Federal Government the task of pro- 
viding medical care for all the people. 


WHY AMERICAN MEDICINE IS BEST IN WORLD 


In the short span of one hundred fifty years American Medicine 
has moved forward to a position of universally recognized world 
leadership. It has provided a more effective and a more widely 
and evenly distributed medical care than ever has been made avail- 
able anywhere at any time. If analyzed and understood, the 
achievement is without parallel in the history of the progress of 
mankind. 

In the successful treatment and cure of disease, medical care 
must be considered as having two separate yet closely related 

parts : 

Firtt: There is ditease — disease as such. There 
are many diseases. Each disease is ceaselessly, re- 
lentlessly seeking a human body to destroy. And 
each disease affects each human body in a differ- 
ent way. 


Second.* There is the patient— a human be- 
ing — who, by accident, misfortune or coincidence , 
contracts a disease. 

American Medicine has conquered many diseases— controls 
many others. However, the basic factor responsible for the un- 
equalled effectiveness of the practicing physician is that the 
whole of his effort always is concentrated on treating and curing 
the patient — the human being who is sick. Incidentally, only, is 
he concerned with conquering the disease. The basic tenet of 
American medicine is that where there is a sick patient — a lif • 
is the issue. It matters not whether prince or pauper is involved. 
The one concern is that of saving the human life which is in 
jeopardy. The task is exclusively a matter between the patient, 
the doctor, and their God, 


KEEP YOUR DOCTOR A FREE MAN! 


The doctor is a human being, a person — a personality. His tra- 
dition, knowledge and experience make him more sure and more 
confident than his fellowmen. The new Wagner-Murray-Dingell 
Bills now before Congress would rob him of his freedom of action 


and decision and make him subordinate and subservient to the 
bureaucrat. Beaucratic direction would destroy the intangible, 
indefinable essence that is the secret of the American doctor’s 
effectiveness. 


THIS ADVERTISEMENT IS CONTRIBUTED VS A PROTEST VGYINST THE \\ VGNER-Ml RRVY-D1NGELL BILLS 
UY WILFRED CHAGNON. CHAIRMAN OF THE N VTIONAL COMMITTEE ON SOCIALIZED 
PHARMACY VNI) MEDICINE VN1) PROPRIETOR OK 

in 11 11 aii nun: stoke 

AN ACCREDITED PHARMACY, AMERICAN COLLEGE OK CPOTH EC ARIES 

425 Centre Street (o PP o,iu Library) Newton 

This Issii** Must be Decided by the Congress oi the ( iiilfd States. Members of t ongress 
are Entitled to Know tl hot the People of Their Districts Think About These Proposals. 
To Ik or ll rite at Once to Your Senators and Congressmen. 





PACE SIX 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY, 21, 1946 


Peace Gardens 


Millions of homo pardoners are debating this spring how large 
a vegetable plot to sow. now that peace has come. Victory gar- 
dens saved the nation from food scarcity. Is that danger over? 

Whether it is or not. high costs seem certain to continue in 
commercial production. Leisure hours spent growing food will 
probably pay a high return for years to come. The home veg- 
etable plot will go far to hold down the cost of living. 

And another reason will influence many. The quality of 
vegetables fresh from the garden has become known to millions 
who never before realized how delicious they could be. They have 
enjoyed luxury food of such supreme flavor and tenderness, that 
vegetables assumed a new importance in their diet. This, nutri- 
tionists tell us, is to be desired. 

For garden-fresh vegetables are not only delicious, but nutri- 
tious. Science has developed many new facts about the loss of 
vitamins when vegetables grow stale. It has long been known 
that the sugar content of sweet corn, peas and several others 
rapidly change to starch after they are picked, with consequent 
loss of flavor. 

"Holding freshly picked peas in a warm room for 3 to 4 hours 
will materially toughen the skins." says Extension bulletin 244 
from the University of Michigan. And one to two-thirds of their 
original Vitamin C. the bulletin continues, may be lost by veg- 
etables in 24 hours at room temperature. 

The quicker they are eaten, frozen or canned, after being har- 
vested, the more delicious vegetables are, And the time is brief. ; 
indeed, before the keen edge of their flavor begins to grow dull. 

Paul W. Dempsey of the Massachusetts State college says in 
his excellent book Grow Your Own Vegetables: "Vegetables should 
be used as soon after picking as possible. Time is one of the 
elements that favor the home gardener uncooked vegetables on 
the table in less than fifteen minutes, and cooked vegetables in 
less than thirty minutes from the time they were growing!" 

That seems an extreme view. For those whose gardens are 
not close to the kitchen door it would make harvesting a foot- 
race. But authorities agree that, to be truly "garden fresh," 
vegetables must be served within an hour or two of harvesting: 
so that to cat them is an experience which few except home gar- 
deners who grow they' own can enjoy. 

America has much to gain from the expansion of home gar- 
dening which seems certain to follow the war. Homes and com- 
munities will be beautified by flowers: and vegetables grown in 
backyards will notably improve the health and contentment of 
those that grow them. 

Wise gardeners follow the advice of The Clapper Co.. 1121 
Washington street. West Newton, which is "Plan before you Plant.” 
Mr. Howden of the Clapper Co., who has had many years of 
gardening experience, and who is a seed expert, will be glad to 
help you plan your "Peace Garden." 


Newton Club Activities 


Lydia Partridge 
Whiting Chapt., DAR 


Newtonville 
Woman's Club 


o 


F. A. Day Junior 
High News 


Auburndale 
Woman's Club 


The Lydia Partridge Whiting 
Chpter. D. A. R. will hold their 
monthly meeting Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 26 at the Newton High- 
lands Club Workshop, 
will be served at 1:30. 

Guest Day every one is urged to ica, were sung. Mrs, 
come. Ferrin at the piano. 


The regular meeting of the 

Newtonville Woman’s Club was by the Ninth Grade was held in 
held on Tuesday, February 19th, the auditorium on Friday, Fob- 
at 2:30 p.m., Miss Estelle G. ruary 15, from 3 to 4:45. The 
Dessert Marsh, president conducted the general committee included Don- 
As it is exercises. Two verses of Amer- Koch. Edward Parsons, Janet 
, y,... „ Martin, Patricia Morrill. Nancy 

m * Shea, and Bruce Peters. In charge 
The mem- n f refreshments were Frances 


The program will be Mildred bers stood in silent remembrance Gentile, Donald Koch. Norma 

Buchanan Flagg, writer and lee* of Miss Margaret C. Worcester, Boule, Betty Marie Peck, Gibson 

turer, who will speak on "Modern the last remaining charter mem- Gardiner, Robert Pettys and Nela 

Marors of History." ber of the club, whose death occ i Fbrsuson. Jack Swartz Russell 

.. . _ Taylor, and Gibson Gardiner 

The hostesses are Mrs. Richard urred recently. Mrs Clifford O. we J e on thc lickct committee . 

Cody. Miss Cora Cobb, Mrs. Mooney, corresponding secretary Thc decorating in a Valentine 

Janies Hemphill and Mrs. Robert read an appeal for volunteer motif was done by Robert Swed- of the Club members. 

Pi How. workers at the Newton- Wellesley berg, Robert Deraney, Jane Wa- The guest speakers of the after- 

The chairman of hospitality is Hospital. Help is especially need- 1 tcrs ’ Robcrt Toh, ’ r - and David noon will be Mrs. Gladys Bucket 


— o — 

The American Home Group of 
the Auburndale Woman's Club, 
with Mrs. Robert Bonner Jr., as 
Day chairman, will have an all 
A valentine dance sponsored day meeting on Tuesday, Febru- 
ary 26th, beginning at 11 a. m., 
when Mr. A. I. Eastman of East- 
man's Flower Shop of Newton- 
ville, will speak on "Flower Ar- 
rangements.” 

Club members and guests will 
bring a box lunch and dessert 
and coffee will be served by the 
Hospitality Committee. At 2 p.m. 
the President, Mrs. Eric J. Ker- 
math, will Conduct the business 
meeting. 

There will be a "Hobby Lobby" 
with an exhibition of "Hobbies” 



: Cravatts. The advertising was ! Jones, President of the Garland 
in charge of Robert Pettys, Nan! School of Boston and Mrs. Kay 


Mrs. Charles Joy and her assisted in the kitchen, dining room 

tants are Mrs. Henry Arnold, and fountain. Thursday is New- j G e ntiTe, 

Mrs. Louis Attwill, Mrs. Arthur tonvillc day at the hospital, any The music was furnished by at the Garland School. 


and Betty-Marie Peck, j Patterson Parker, Director of Art 


George Boule’s orchestra. Facul- 
ty sponsors were Miss Marguer- 
ite -Lougee and Mr. Scott Brent. 

A one-act comedy, Accent on 
Revenge, was presented by the 
Nine Grade Drama Group at the 
February 15 assembly. How 
eight college girls straightened 
out their tangled dates for a 
school dance was thc plot which 
was ablv unfolded by the follow- 
ing cast: Joan Chase, Carol De- 
Veau, Eva Geiringer. Ann Shri- 


Sarah Hull ChaDter 
D. R. 

— o— 

Sarah Hull Chapter. Daughters 
of the Revolution, held the 49th 
annual meeting on Wednesday. 
February 13th, 1946. at 10:30 a m. 
at the home of mrs Charles E. 
Morrow. 70 Arlington street. New- 
ton. 

The Regent, Mrs. Arthu** C. 
Johnson, presided, and after the 
Salute to the Flag, a short busi- 
ness meeting was held. Then the 
annual reports were in order. 
The Recording Secretary, the 
Corresponding Secretary, the 
Treasurer, and Auditor gave the 
records of thc past year, which 
were approved as read. Then 
the Historian. Mrs. Raymond S. 
Fosgatc, gave a very interesting 
report on the activities and pleas- 
ures of the members during the 
past year, winch was very much 
enjoyed. After that the ballot 
for officers for the year. 1946- 
1917 was voted upon, and the 
following officers were elected: 

Regent. Mrs. Arthur C. John- 
son: Vice Regent. Mrs. Albert B. 
Hinkle, Jr.: Recording Secretary, 
Mrs. Walter C. Whitney; Corres- 
ponding Secretary. Mrs. James 
A. Curten: Assistant Correspond- 
ing Secretary. Mrs. Willard L. 
Sampson: Treasurer. Miss A. 
Gertrude Ensign; Auditor. Mrs. 
Francis Murdock: Historian. Mrs. 


Raymond S. Fosgate; Councillors 
for 2 years, Mrs. Annie L. East- 
man. Mrs. Edward Cahill. 

The members then enjoyed a 
box luncheon. Mrs. Morrow, the 
hostess, serving coffee and ife 
cream. A social hour, with 
bridge, was enjoyed the rest of 
the afternoon, and the 49th An- 
nual Meeting was over. 

o 

Newton Highlands 
Garden Club 

— o — 

The February meeting of the 
Newton Highlands Garden Club 
will be held at the Workshop on 
Tuesday, thc 26th at 8 p.m. 

The guest speaker is to be Mr. 
George Graves, associate editor 
of Horticulture. 

The hostesses are Mrs. Walter 
S. Newton, Jr., and Mrs. Albert 
N. Walker. 

o 

Social Science Club 
of Newton 

— o — 

"The Oregon Country" will be 
the subject of a paper given by 
Mrs. Clarence C. Smith at the 
meeting of the club on Wednes- 
day at 10 a.m. Miss Florence 
Baron and Miss Hope Mudg ■ 
will be the hostesses. 


Bcrberian. Mrs. Albion Brown, one who can give a few hours on 
Mrs. Myron Cudworth. Mrs. Jo- (hat or any other day. telephone 
sephine Cushman, Mrs. George Big. 6326, and ask for Mrs. John- 
Eldridge, Miss Madeline Foster, son. 

Mrs. Edmands S. Lingham, Mis. Mrs. Hugh A. McCrea, chair- 
Charles S. Logan. Miss Mercedes man of Ways and Means, an- 
Torr and Miss Florence Torr. nounced her plans for the Cof- 

o j fee-Dessert Bridge to be held at 

T3 /-\4- anr Pink the clubhoftse on March 26th. 

Newton notary UiUD Many attractive features will be 
— o — found, among them, door prizes, 

Speaking on the "Place of an “elephant table" etc. For reser- 
Light in Human History" at the vations, phone, Big. 2973. 
meeting, of the Newton Rotary Several interesting announce- berg. Jean Atkinson. .Tapet Pow 
Club last Friday, Mr. Julius ments were made by Miss Marsh, ell, Ann Morrill, and Gloria An- 
Daniels, Past President of the on February 27th and 28th, the tonellis. Backstage helpers were 
Society of Illuminating Engin- Mid-Winter meeting of the Massa- Betty Ann Stokes. Mary Tean 
eers, outlined thc history of man- chusetts State Federation of Carter. Barbara Green and Ed- 
made illumination from its earli- Women’s Clubs will be held, the ward Parsons, 
est beginning 10.000 vears ago f, rs t day at the Hotel Statler, A sn^ond feature was a Ouiz 
up to the present day. Emphaz- an d the second day at the Schu- Kids Program with Quiz Mis- 
ing our indebtedness to Thomas bert Theatre. On the afternoon : tress. Nela Ferguson: Judge, 
Edison whose 99th birthday will D f the 27th, the program will be - q ally Lord- and Quiz Kids, David 
be observed this month. Mr. sponsired by the Herald-Traveler. Cravatts, Greta Sovland, Janet 
Daniels said that Edison not only Qn Thursday morning by the House and Nancy Shea, 
supplied the inventive genius but Christian Science Monitor, and in Mrs. Lorraine Holmes was in 
also organized financial resourc- t he afternoon, by the Boston eharnre of the program. Cather- 
os to bring about the lighting Globe. Many outstanding speak- ine Marchand was the announ- 
industry as we now know it. In ers w ill be heard. On March 20th, ! cer. 

the last 40. years he said the a t the Copley Plaza Hotel, the an- Nine boxes of food and cloth- 
cost of lighting has been reduced nua j Music Festival of the Feder- in P weighing eleven pounds each 
40 times with the further pros- a ti 0 n will be held. were packed for the needy 

pect of continual reduction in Miss Marsh introduced Mrs. Peonies of Europe by the girls 
the future. Graham Bates who spoke of the of 9 C A and 9 C B. Elizabeth 

Mr. Daniels exhibited vaiious continued needs of the American ' Nastasia broueht in fifty-one 
examples of lamps including the p ef j Gross, which will soon be- items. All packing was done by 


animal-fat. moss-wick Neolithic 


gin its drive for funds. 


fifty Valentine favors were sent 
to a nearby veterans’ hospital. 
Pupils in Miss Tobin's and Mrs. 
Al- Kiloon Murnhv, Rita Viscn. Agnes Hubbell’s home rooms assisted in 


Newton Smith 
College Club 

— o — 

The Newton Smith College 
Club will hold its February meet- 
ing at thc home of Mrs. William 
M. Bassett, 15 Howland road, 
West Newton on Monday, Feb- 
ruary 25th at 2:30 p.m. 

Mrs. John N. Eaton, who re- 
cently attended the Alumnae 
Council meetings in Northamp- 
ton as a delegate from this club, 
will give the Council reports. 

Following the reports, Miss 
Cynthia Brown, an accomplished 
pianist, will entertain.* Miss 
Brown, daughter of one of the 
club members, is an artist pupil 
of Mr. Heinrich Gebhard. She 
has won highest honors four 
times in thn National Federation 
of Music Contests, and she has 
played publicly many times. 
Miss Brown hopes to enter 
Smith next Fg^l where she will 
major in music. 

Afternoon tea will be served 
at the conclusion of the meeting. 


lamp, the Roman lamp in use at though the actual fighting has Boyafian. Mary Ann Whalen, making and packing them, 
the dawn of the Christian Era. on dcd, the continuation of all the Marv Paulino. Anne Uhlman. and ; A United Nations project is 
the whale oil lamp, and Benjamin serv j ces G f the Red Cross, both Dorothv Goodrich. Girls who con- now on display in the glass 
Franklin's two-burner, all of ^ere ancl a b roa d, is of great im- tributed were Anne Uhlman. panels in the art room. Cos- 
which were precursors of pres- por t ancc- Another guest pre- Agnes Bo.vaiian, Rita Visco. Dor- tumes, occupations, and scenes 
ent day methods. sented by Miss Marsh, was Mrs. i othy Goodrich. Bettv McClure, typifying each nation are fea- 

The speaker was introduced by Gharles Kolster, of Somerville, Mary Hough Jean Boudrot. Mary tured in the colored paper post- 

Harold Secord. State Recording Secretary of the Antonellis. Gloria Antonellis. ers which adorn the panels. 

On Tuesday of this week the p 0( jcration, who brought a mes- - T ane Devlin. Lois B’-own. Dolores The clay objects made by 
Newton Rotary Club sponsored sa g C f rom the state organization. Barisano, Eileen Myrphv and. Grade 8 have been taken to the 
the information of a Wellesley ^j rg Kolster is also a member of Marv Paulino. Miss Lougee was I Dorchester pottery to be fired. 
Rotary Club at the Wellesley the Committee for the American in r-harge of the project. The new Student Staff for the 

Country Club. Joseph E. Perry Homc an(l has worked closely Under the direction of Miss, second half of year will begin 



of the Newton Rotary Club was w jtj l Miss Marsh, who in addi- 
the speaker. tion t Q being the State Corres- 

The regular Friday meeting o ponc ij n g Secretary in thc Federa- 
Newton Rotary will be omitted r. . . - »•-*-- 

this week because of the holi- 
day. 

Kiwanis Club 

— o — 

Mr. Robert Cusick. recreation 
supervisor of the Boston Park 
Department, entertained the New- 
ton Kiwanis Club, Wednesday, 


Mary Gianferante. Junior Red ] their duties on Monday, Febru- 
Cross chairman for the school, ary 25. 


If you attend "What’s Cooking 
in our Neighborhood’ Pot?" on 
Tuesday evening, April 30, 1946, 
at the Y. M. C. A. ,you will see an 
interesting demonstration of 
Italian cooking and will have a 
chance to taste all the recipes 
made. 

The Newton Nutrition Center 
is presenting this program to the 
citizens of Newton as an opportu- 
nity to broaden knowledge, pleas- 
ure, and appreciation of many 
different kinds of food and -to 
help get greater understanding 
of the variety of customs in 
American living and eating. 

The recipe below is a sample 
of the type of dish that will be 
prepared at the meting. Have you 
ever tried cooking rice Milanese 
style — or as the Italians say — 
Risotto alia Milanese? 

One onion, U cup fat or oil, 1 
cup rice, water or chicken stock, 
pepper and salt, grated cheese. 

Chop the onion very fine and 
cook it in the fat or oil until it is 
yellow and soft. Wash the rice 
and add it to the onion and but- 
ter. Cook for ten minutes, stir- 
ring constantly. Add salt and a 
small amount of w'ater or chicken 
stock (about cup). Cook slow- 
ly, adding more water or stock 
from time to time as the rice 
absorbs it (about 2 cups in all). 
Total cooking time from 30-45 
minutes. The rice can be used 
separately or as a base for a 
sauce. Sauteed chicken livers, to 
which has been added a half 
teaspoon of grated lemon rind 


Lasell Junior College 

— o — 

The speaker at the Monday 
morning assembly was Mr. J. 
David Townsend who was for 
twenl « five years a resident of 
Algeria and France. His topic 
was "North African Berbers.” 

The Honor Roll for the first 
semester is just announced and 
includes the following: 

, Barbara Adler, Weston; Helen 
Clay, Auburndale; Phyllis Clay, 
Auburndale; Carolyn Coleman, 
Newton Highlands; Evelyn Hill- 
is, Colorado Springs, Colo.; Mol- 
ly Ing, Honolulu, Hawaii; Dor- 
othy Maher, Boston, Mass.; Kath- 
leen Murphy, Chestnut Hill; De- 
borah Newton, Wellesley Hills; 
Phyllis Pagliarulo, East Boston; 
Grace Rayfuse, Allston; Rita 
Riley, Watertown; Nan Somer- 
ville, Quincy; Phyllis Sykes, 
Needham; Anne Valentine, Au- 
burndale. 


and a dash of nutmeg, can be 
poured over the rice just before 
serving. Sprinkle with grated, 
cheese. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesfx, ns. PROBATE COURT 

To all person* interested In th* 
estate of 

Cornelia F. Kntilnann 

late of Newton In said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by Malcolm A. 
Warren of Newton in said County, 
praylns that he be appointed execu- 
tor thereof, without Riving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on the fourth day of March 1916, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. I.eggat. Enquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
eleventh day of Februnry In the year 
one thousnnd nine hundred and forty- 
six. 

LORING P. JORDAN, 

<N) f 14-21-28 Register. 


L. CONTE 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

Expert service to satisfy your desire. Alter or repair your home. 
Playroom re-modeling and cabinet work are our specialties. 
Many Newton and Brookline residents have patronized our services. 

Telephone NEEdham 1309-M 


HERTEL ELECTRIC CO. 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

Franchise Dealer 

WESTINGHOUSE -- BLACKSTONE 
CROSLEY - ROYAL 

1345 WASHINGTON STREET WEST NEW TAN 


tion is also a Counsellor for the 
Department of Fine Arts. 

Mrs. Kenneth A. Bernard, lyric 
soprano, accompanied by Mrs. 
Harold G. Osterland, delighted 
the large number of members and 
guests with a group of songs, 
Voi che Sapete, by Mozart; Si 
mes vers avaient des ailes, by 
Reynaldo Hahn; Lift thine eyes, 



February 13, with movies of the by Logan and the ever delight- 
1945 World Series games between ful Russian song, The Sleigh by 
the champion Detroit Tigers and Kountz. 

the Chicago Cubs. Hank Gieen- The speaker for the afternoon 
berg and company managed to was Mr. J. David Townsend, who 
sink the Cubs, but it required recently returned to this country 
sovo'n full games and a lot of after twenty nine years in Al- 
heads up baseball to do the trick, geria and France. Mr. Townsend 
It was announced that the for many years was the director 
Filth Division Council meeting of the Memorial Centre in Paris, 
will be held at the Hotel Com- an d in that capacity he met many 
mandcr. Cambridge, on Tuesday, Q f the outstanding figures 


February 19th. The Newton 
Service Clubs will meet with the 
Chamber of Commerce in the* 
Normandy Room, Norumbega 
Park, March 20th. Dr. Ernest 
Marcoux announced that nem- 
bers of the Newton Kiwanis Club 
will journey to West Roxbury 
on February 21, attending the 
Kiwanis meeting there as guests 
of the Roslindale-West Roxluirv 


French thought and culture. He 
paid an outstanding tribute to 
the women of France, their 
charm and seriousness, and their 
devotion to their homes and chil- 
dren. Ho described the wide di- 
vision between the wealthj 
classes' who live on the Right 
Bank, and the middle and labor 
ing classes on the Left Bank, a 


Cluh. Pollen ” Chief.'" Nicholas division which was lessoned by 
Vcduccio. inducted Max Hobson the terrible suffering endured by 



into ihe club at this meeting. 
Mr. Henry Gaffney, of the Amer- 
ican Red Cross, will be the speak- 
er at next week’s meeting and 
will show moving picture® of 
various Red Cross activities. 

HMI MllMVHI.ni Oh 
M \ nh \ j ii i si; | | h 

M 'I'll- • x. PIH HJATr! COURT 


t unities now for 


IMPORTANT PUBLIC SFRYICF 

For girls who want more than "just a job"; but 
who are eager for an interesting career in public 
service, there are opportunities now with the 
New Hngland Telephone Company. 

Previous experience isn’t necessary. You’ll he 
paid w hile you learn. And remember, you'll learn 
a skill that will benefit you for a lifetime. 

Girls find the Telephone Company a "friendly 
place to work Ihe surroundings are pleasant; 
your associates congenial. There are opportunities 
for advancement plus compensations in various 
forms. All these go to make telephone work one of 
the most attractive walks of life you may follow. 
Come in and let's talk it over. 

Ati al once. You iua> telephone io inquire 
t Jk S about these po - beiwcen u.JO A.M. and 
1 MK r ii P. M. without charge, hr calling finer- 
• prise 1000. 

k-mptnmtnl Qffitt 244 State Street Hotuia 

NEW ENGIAND TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY 


thirn-Mith 


; linn pro 
hllmvniK i 
nunts. In 


f v..ii <|i-!-ln> to objt'i't thereto 
• .it it-.orm-y aliouhl lil« a wi 
Haninre in wild Until t at t 
litre hrfoi'f HMI o'lloik In til,. 
>t, on the fourth day of .M 
•i. the return day of ihi* vital 

Vitnv John la KIM I, K,.| 

si Judge of Mild * on 1 1 . thi> 

. J l-Vln u II V ill the > II oni t 
id nliu. Imndn-d and fnrly-wix 

I.ORIN'f I I’ IUIIHA' 

1 14-21 Iteg 


IS U I M I II 


II o In* 1 1 I . -Ii. Mo 


OF 


both Classes under the iron boot 
of Hitler. Mr. Townsend was in- 
terested in the effect of the right 
of the suffrage which has recent- 
ly been granted to women in 
France, he gave great praise to 
the attainments of the French 
women, and commented on the 
great number of women lawyers, 
and doctors, as well as teachers. 
In France married women are 
valued highly as teachers, it be- 
ing believed that they have a 
greater understanding of chil- 
dren. 

The next meeting of the Club 
will bo on March 5th. This is the 
annual Bank Day, through Ihe 
courtesy of the Newton-Waltham 
Trust Company. An outstanding 
speaker and musical program is 
planned. This is an open meet- 
ing and all friends of members 
and the Bank are invited to at- 
tend. Tea will be served. 

I ll >i MON \\ I VI.TII OF 
Ml>s\i || | HF.TTS 

I Sit. . X, • mtOHATK t tn.'KT 

all portions Inteicntril In ihe 


. f \.- 


S. NH-, 


Beautify Your Home NOW! 


SAAOO 

mi 

Soli $27, Chair $17 

$125 Weekly 


REUPHOLSTER 

Re-Decorate Your 
Old Living Room Suite 
With NEW FABRIC 

From Our Large Selection including 
Brocalelles — Damask — Tapestry 
Friezes and Novelty Patterns 


up 


★ New Seat Cushions 

H Whdt Ar Flexible Steel Construction 

You’re Sure ' * Spri r?‘ J 

Diamond Tied 
to Get at the * f remes Repaired, 

Retouched and Braced 

BRISTOL SHOPS* N,w .. 1 F « lt °" d L M °»» 

Filling Where Needed 



Your Old Sturdy Framot 
Redocorattd 
To Look tik* Now 


DROP A POST-CARD or 

WALtham 5689-W 

25 Years of Experience Will Rrinp You 
Comfort and Durability to Your Home 
— Within the Price of Your Pockethook 

SMALL DOWN PAYMENT-NO FURTHER PAYMENTS UNTIL 10 DAYS AFTER DELIVERY 

Remember— There Is A Difference 


Our Estimator Will Call at Your Convon- 
ionco with Chair Longth Samples from 
Which to Make Your Selection — 


FLEXIBLE 

STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

Our awn original method. 'File moH vital 
part of ratir living room anile i* the 
■pring ronatrurtion. Our new writhing 
and underalnirtnra prevents spring «*g- 
ging. 



BRISTOL 


100 MAPLE ST„ WALTHAM 


Mmmbmri Dodhmm 

( hmmhcr /» / fnmmrrn 


Certified 

UPHOLSTERY 

0-Year 

Guarantee 



DEDHAM • Factory 


I ( .N ) (7-14-21 


l.un 







PAGE SEVEN 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY. 21, 1946. 




ubVTAun u n n r n i < 


REAL ESTATE 


REAL ESTATE 


HOUSES 

WANTED 


OA8H CUSTOMERS WMTINQI 
List Your Property with a 
REALTOR 

HOWE ASSOCIATES 

Afld Commonwealth Avenue. Newton Centra 

Call mo. 6500 


HELP WANTED 


HELP WANTED 


MORTGAGE SERVICE 

If you arc about to buy, build, or possibly refinance your present 
mortgage, consult a firm with a background of over 100 years 
of dependable service. Interest rates as low as 4 r /e. Construction • 
permanent loans arranged, one title examination for both. Re- 
gardless of what type of mortgage you wish to arrange, be sure 
to consult us first. No commission charged. Prompt attention 
assured. Mortgage loan correspondents for 

PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

REALTORS 

1297 Beaoon Street, Brookline 46 - - - ASPInwall 1504 


SPECIAL NOTICE TO BUILDERS 

FOR SALE L0T OF land located at 


1ft CHARLKS STREET (Rear) 

Auburndale — from VA to VVi acres. Very 
desirable. 

132 BROAD ST., BOSTON 
TELEPHONE HANcock 3966 
Residence — 77 Beaumont Ave., Newtonville-BIG. 7210 


M. J. Odence 


YOUNG MAN 
20-30 Years Old 

TO LEARN GROCERY BUSINESS 
Full Time 
APPLY MANAGER 

27 Lincoln Street Newton Highlands 

(formerly hood’s Creamery) 



Ward Maids — Floor-Kitchen Women 
Laundry Workers 

FULL OR PART TIME 

APPLV BETWEEN 9:80-11 ;00 A. M. PERSONNEL OFFICE 

Newton-Wellesley Hospital — Newton Lower Falls 


WANTED in Wellesley Hills, a 
cleaning woman regularly, 4 to 
6 days a week. A block and a 
third from bus line. Call WEL- 
Icsloy 0413. fl4-3t 

WORK WANTED 


W-A-N-T-E-D 

Old Furniture. China. Brle-a-Bra« 
Richest Prices Paid 

HITCHCOCK HOUSE 

1161 Wsshlmton St.. - West Newton 
Call Vt 4 ft ha m 8IT0-M 


BUILDING CUSTODIAN 

Capable man to operate oil burnlna 
healing plant and to care for Church 
bulldlnr in Newton. Full time, per- 
manent position. License not re- 
quired. Married man preferred. Write 
elvln* qualifications, age. and tele- 
phone number. Earlr appointment 
arranged. 

Write GRAPHIC BOX F. G. 


FOR SALE 


WANTED 

Clerk-Typist 

FUI.I. TIME 

Apply 9:110 to II A. M. Personnel Office 

Newton-Wellesley Hospital 

NEWTON LOWER FALLS 


For . . . 

NEWTON 
REAL ESTATE 

. . . See 

Paul Harris Drake 

626 Commonwealth Ave. 
NEWTON CENTRE 

DECatur 1020 


For Real Estate Service 

NEWTON ESTATES 

BIGelow 1280 

Spccialitts in Neal Estate 


LOW RATE MORTGAGES 

If you are paying more than 4'j r c 
Interest on your mortgage, we can 
save you hundred* o' dollars. No 
lee — confidential aervlce. Call, 
write., phone. 

N. BUTLER 

R0 Boylstnn St.. Boston HAN. 1088 


WANTED TO Bl’Y: Two- fam- 
ily house in Newton Corner with 
oil heat, breakfast nook and ga- 
rage. Good location near church- 
es. $500 cash, and substantial 
payment when I dispose of my 
property. Address Gra- 

phic Office. 


TURNISHED ROOMS 

FOR RENT: Large, pleasant 
furnished bedroom. Near trans- 
portation. Gentleman preferred. 
Call Big. 2035 after 6:30 p.m. f21 

ROOM in Newtonville, warm 
sunny room in private family. 
Best location. Gentleman pre- 
ferred. Call Big. 4216 after 6 
P-m. f21-2t 

TO LET: Newtonville, large, 
sunny, furnished room, nice and 
warm for winter. Private home 
with home comforts. Otis St., 
near Christian Science Church. 
Rent reasonable. Tel. BIG. 7033. 

f21-tf 


APARTMENTS WANTED 



LOST AND FOUND 


LOST SAVINGS BANK BOOKS 

Sarlnga Bunks Books as listed below 
are lo>t and application has been made 
for payments of the accounts In ue* 
rordance with Sec. 40 Chap, 66# of the 
Acts of 1008 and amendments. 

Newton- Waltham Bank & Trust 
Co. No. 5387. 

Newton-Walthani Bank & Trust 
Co. No. H 4593. 

West Newton Savings Bank 
Book No. 19536. 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
84956. 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
88172 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
90119 

Auburndale Co-operative Matured 
Share Certificate No. 1668 
Newton National Bank Book No. 

4055 

Newton Co-operative Bank Book 
No. 15341 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
76732 

West Newton Savings Bank Book 
No. 22543 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
72157 

Newton-Walthani Bank & Trust 
Co. No. V- 12 184 

Newton-Walthani Bunk & Trust 
Co. No. V 119911 
Co. No. VI-19911 
Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
9132ft. 

Newton Savings Bunk Book No. 
71685. 


without children or pets. Best 
references; require 2 or 3-room 
apartment on first or second 
floor in residential district by 
April 1. Tel evenings, BIG. 3677. 

j31-4tz 

VETERAN, wife and child 
would like to rent 4 or 5-room 
apartment. Newton or Wellesley. 
Phone LASell 3180. fl4-2tz 

WANTED:, 2 to 4-room fur- 
nished apartment desperately 
needed by young couple in 
school. Ex-navy officer, no chil- 
dren. B. C. Hammerschmidt. 
Phone BEAcon 1022. f21z 


Wonderful Opportunity 

FOLK GIRLS 

WANTED AT ONCE TO TRAIN 
with one ol America’* leading cosmetic 
companies. Some sale* experience ad- 
visable. Highly remunerative. Call 

Orrin White-KENmora 8379 


PERMANENT full time posi- 
tion for young woman in gift 
and yarn shop. Waban Gift and 
Yarn Shop, 1631 Beacon St., Wa- 
ban. fl-l-2t 

WANTED: Gardener - house- 
man • handyman, for par! tfine. 
65 cents hr. References. BIG. 
0215. f21z 

WANTED: Excellent cooking 
for week ends - dinners, serving, 
Saturdays and Sundays. Prot- 
estant. References. BIG. 0215. 

f21z 

WANTED: PART-TIME SEC- 
RETARY to work in private 
home in Waban about 8 hours a 
week. Will pay $1 per hour. 
Must know shorthand. Tel. DEC. 
0996. f21 


FOB SALE 


Foldlnr Screen 
Electric Humidifier 


S.VIHI 
XI 0.00 


WANTED: By junior high 
school girl, work 2 or 3 after- 
noons a week, taking care of 
children. M. N. G., Graphic Of- 
fice. f21z 

CHILD CARE by dav or week 
now, l.i.rni OI . wi |] S | t evenings. Call Lasel! 

Shaker Rocker ° 


HOUSEHOLD SERVICES 


Bargains in Furniture 

SEELEY BROS. CO. 

757 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTONVILLE 
Tel. — BIGelow 7441 


6155. 


f21 


FIREPLACE WOOD, oak, well 
seasoned. Any length. Will de- 
liver during next two months. J. 
C. Walker, WAYland 118, ring 3. 
, nl-tf 


A national firm has an excel- 
lent opportunity to offer to a wo- 
man — cultural background more 
necessary than business training. 
i Hours flexible. Personal inter- 
view required. Call Decatur 1176 
between 9 and 12 a.m. f21 


FOR SALE: Dennis, Cape Cod, 
vicinity Cape Playhouse, short 
distance from Nobscussett Beach. 
6-room cottage and garage, sur- 
rounded by trees; sitting room 
with fireplace; tile bath on sec- 
ond floor; shower with closet on 
first. Comfortably furnished at 
$6500. Phone BRAintrce 0284. 

f 14-tf 

FURNITURE FOR SALE: 

Bedroom pieces, living room 
pieces. 9 x 12 Sahara rug. Also 
a few antiques. All in good con- 
dition. Call BIG. 5386. f21-tf 

FOR SALE: 127 square yards 
pre-war Mohawk Broadloom 
(sand • glow) covering living 
room, dining room, den, lower 
hall, stairs and large upper hall. 
No dealers. Call LAS. 0928. f21 


MISCELLANEOUS 


LINOLEUM REMNANTS 
Suitable for small bathrooms and j 
counter tops. Also large stock 
Armstrong asphalt tile, inlaid and 
Battleship linoleum, and metal 
edging. Call Johnson, STA. 6560. 
25 Market St., Brighton. o5-tf 


WANTED: B’urnished apart- 
j ment, two or three rooms ami 
bath, by mother anil adult 
daughter. Near Newton Secre- 
tarial School. Tel. WAL. 5684-M. 

f21-2tz 

WANTED by teacher, small, 
unfurnished, heated apartment 
in the Newtons. Or would be 
glad to share someone's home. 
Tel. BIG. 3021. f21-2tz 


HOUSEWORKER wanted, 2 
mornings a week. At Newton 
Corner. Call Decatur 8980. f21 

REFINED housekeeper for 
widow, near Newton Corner. 
Scotch or English preferred. De- 
sirable position for right party. 
Las. 8470. f21z 


WANTED in Newtonville, a 
cleaning woman regularly one 
day a week or three or four 
hours a week or once every two 
weeks in small apartment. Call 
Decatur 9044. f21z 


HARVARD Instructor, return- 
ed from Pacific carrier duty, des- 
perate for unfurnished apt. or 
house rental. Wife and baby. 
Car. Best references. Call Need- 
ham 0266 anytime. f21z 


ANTIQUES WANTED 


Earn good income representing 
Avon Cosmetics as advertised 
in Good Housekeeping. Write 
C.A., Graphic Office. f21 


FOR SALE: Inlaid mahogany 
Sheraton dining room set. BIG. 
2186. f21z 

FOR SALE: Two slightly used 
(Oriental) Sarouk rugs, in per- 
fect condition, size 7 ft. 6-in. by 
11 feet. Price $300 each. Tel. 
WELlesley 3602. f21z 

FOR SALE: "DuPont” Deluxe 
finish white enamel ice chest, in 
excellent condition. Tel. BIG. 
9185. f21z 

FOR SALE: Man's Roadmas- 
ter bicycle; new, with accessories, 
$45.00. Can be seen Tuesday, 
Feb. 26, 7 to 9 p.m. Address, 260 
Broadway. Arlington. f21 


RENT a Singer Sewing ma 
chine for ns long ns desired In- 
quire about our special rates. 
Classes in dressmaking, home dec- 
orations, children's clothes and 
make-over now forming; morning 
afternoon and evening classes. 
Singer Sewing Machine Co., 424 
Moody St. Waltham. Tel. WAL 
3331. d2tf 


RADIO REPAIRS at low prices, 
Newton Music Store. LAS. 0610. 

s27tf 

HAVE YOUR Sewing Machine 
serviced bv our bonded service 
men in your own home. All parts 
and work guaranteed. Singer 
Sewing Machine Co., 424 Moody 
St., Waltham Tel. WAL. 3331. 

d2tl 


DRY scrap lumber 1 load $7.50 
sawed for fireplace, $12.50, bag 
wood ‘25c a bag or n for $) taken 
Also a few cords of dry cord wool. 
Marshall C. Spring Co., inc., 15 
River St., Newton Lower Falla 
WEL. 3100 a31-8tz 


Seeley Bros. Co. 

DISTINCTIVE UPHOLSTERING 
Window Shade* 

Matlre** Maker* - Antique* Restored 
Phone BIGelow 7111 • Eit. 1904 
187.4 Washington St., Newtonville 


ANTIQUES WANTED 
Reliable authority will pay highest 
prices for your old furniture, oriental 
V4U*. (last, china, brass, copper, pew- 
ter. bronze, silver, ShelTleld, rliande 
| liers. firearms. Are sets, gold and sil- 
ver jewelry. Write us what you have. 
Wn will appraise for you. 

B. GREGORY 

IHII Hoy Islon St.. Boston - KEN 7HW 


LIBERAL REWARD for re- 
turn of black and tan German 
Shepherd. Cuts on forepaws, tan 
between ears, wearing choke 
chain, name "Barry". Last seen 
vicinity of Newton Upper Falls. 
Call owner, NEW. 2194-M and 
use utmost caution when hand- 
ling. fl4-2tz 


Household Furnltura 
Storage 

Pianos, trunks, etc., in our new ten- 
crate and brick modern warehouse 
individual locked rooms. Separate 
moth-proof rooms for rugs and over- 
stuffed furniture 

LICENSED AND BONDED 

Steffens Storage Warehouse 

197 Webster St.. West Newton 

LASel 2436 


LOST 

IRISH SETTER, answers to 
the name of "Hunter. Wear- 
ing collar marked Paul Mosser. 

GALL LASell 0198 

REWARD 


SELL YOUR 

BOOKS 

TO HALL - BIGelow 2888 

Eighteen \ ears in !\ etc tun 


COM MON WK V I. T|| OF 
M ASS VI III M’ 1 IN 

Middlesex, mv PltOMATi: COURT 
To alt persona hilcrcHtP<l in Out 
Ei«tale of 

John s. heater 

late •>! I’rov lili'licu In the Stale of 
Rhode Inland di-i'cawd, leaving eatuln 
in Raid t’ounly >>f Middlesex. 

A in tlllon Iim* bo< n piv-i-nteil to ' 
>i Id I'ourt. liiaylui: that l'u\ld 1*\ | 
Donnelly at (’ruiiMton In thu State of 
Rhode Inland he appointed miIiiiIiiIn- 
trator of Vault! estate*, without giving 
a surety on hi* bond. 

If you di'sliu to object 'hereto ><>u 
or your attorney should UK* a written 
ippearaiu <• In aaid Court at Cun- 
hrlilga before ten o'clock In 'lie fore- 
noon on the foiirtll da\ of .March 
I D Its the iviuru U->' of lliU cliati.ni 
Wit lie ■«-, .lohu l.eggal . K:<UUil | 
Flint J nd Kit <-r -.ud i’ourt. till:* . 'bull 
day of February in the *,..n one ilv-ni- , 
•and ulna handled «nd forty- i. 

I.ORINli IV JORDAN | 

( N ) f 14 ■ 1! 12 it Reglat. i 


COMMON WFAI.TH of 
M VSSAt III M I I n 

Mtdcilc-ex.es. PRnHATK COURT 

To all pornonii Interested In tho 
estate of 

Henry ile Mniitlgiiy 

Into of Newton In »uitl County, do- 
ceased, 

A petition ha» been presented to 
i*u Id Court for probate of a cml iln 
iindniineiit purporting to lie tin* last 
will oi said dc-nsed by Rosullda du 
Montlgii) of Newton In unlit County, 
praying that nhe be appointed execu- 
trix (hereof, without giving a surety 
on her bond 

If you desire to object tlp-irjo ><>u 
<>r vniir alloi ne,* should tile . t, iitl.-n 
appeal aim* In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o’clock In the fore- 
noon on tli* unli da* of March »’J«. 
tin- i .1 utn day of (Ids cil xt ion 

Wlln.* i*. John c l.egglt. Ks.lll'te 
First .lodge of said i un. 'Ills twolfth 
il l v t.f Febniarv in ih« m- ir one thou 
sand nine hinnlreil and fori- -lx 

i.omxu i* join -an 

IN » flt-’-’l is Regniai 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons Interested In the 
estate of 

Nettle M. Thompson 
late *if Newton In said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition ban been presented to 
said Court for probale of a certain 
Inst nimeut purporting to be the last 
will of slid deceased by Harold 
Miller of Wmvestcr in the County of 
Worcester and William R. Bell of 
Newton in said County of Middlesex, 
praying that they he appointed ex- 
ecutors thereof, without giving a 
surety on their' bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary 1916, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. J.eggnt, Esquire, 
• First Judge of said Court, this 
thirtieth day of January In the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
six. 

LORIXG P. JORDAN. 

(N) 17-11*21 Reglslcc. 


MEDIUM SIZED ICE BOX for 
sale. Cream color, white enamel 
lined. In excellent condition. 
Reasonable. Call DEC. 8980. 

f21z 

TRY OUR FRESH EGGS with 
fine flavor and high food value. 
Call NEE. 1873-J for prompt de- 
livery. f21-2tz 

FOR SALE: Universal electric 
range, practically new. Dec. 9625. 

f21 

FOR SALE: New radio type, 
circulating coal and wood stove, 
with pipe and metal mat. Phone 
Big. 3487. f21z 


NOTICE OF CHANGE OF 
CORPORATE NAME 

We, Marguerite Hastings, 
President, and Gertrude O’Brien, 
a Director of The Alumnae of 
the Newton Hospital School of 
Nursing Inc., a corporation or- 
ganized under the laws of Mass- 
achusetts, located in the city of 
Newton, county of Middlesex, 
hereby give notice that a peti- 
tion executed according to law, 
requesting that the name of the 
corporation be changed to Alum- 
nae of the Newton- Wellesley Hos- 
pital School of Nursing. Inc. was 
submitted to and approved by 
the Commissioner of Corpora- 
tions and Taxation January 14. 
1946, and deposited in the office 
of tiie Secretary of the Common- 
wealth, pursuant to the pro- 
visions of section 11 of chapter 
180 of the General Laws (Ter. 
Ed.), as amended. 

Marguerite Hastings, 

President. 

Gertrude O'Brien. 
AUv«rilMiii#nt Director. 

February 14. .'I. I'-'i* 


FOR SALE: Two Flexible Fiv- 
er sleds, excellent condition; 4 
Perfection oil heaters; 2 Lionel 
train transformers. Phone La- 
sell 1435. f21 • 

FOR SALE reasonable, 12. 36, 
and 40 foot runners. Birdseye 
maple bureau. Porcelain kitchen 
table. Algonquin 3179. f21 

FOB SALE: Well established 
beauty salon in Wellesley. Ad- 
dress LB. Graphic Ofllce. f21 


COMMON WEAL 111 III 
MASSACHUSETTS 

1 Middlesex, ss. PROBATE. COURT 
To all persons Interested In the 
estate of 

Kllxnheth M. Willard 

! late of Newton in said County, de- 
: ceased. 

1 The executors of the will of said 
1 deceased have presented to said Court 
fur allowance their first account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In said Court at Cam* 
i bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
ruary, 194i'>, the return day of this 
■ • 

Witness, John C Legs l Esq 
First Judge f said Court, this 
, thirtieth da> of January in the vex: 
one thousand nine hundred and forty - 
^ six. 

I.ORIXG P JORDAN, 

<S) f 7-1 1-21 Register. 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
'I ASSACHU8E1 1* 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 
To ail persons Interested .n the 
estate of 

Catherine A. Costello 

I late of Newton in said County, de- 
i ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
! said Court for probate of a certain 
i instrument purporting to be the last 1 
will of said deceased by Mary C. 

! Costello of Newton 1 in said County. 

: praying that she be appointed execu- 
trix thereof, without giving a surety 
on her bond. 

i If you desire tu object thereto you 
j or your attorney should file a written! 
i appearance in said Court at Cam- j 
bridge before ten o’clock in the fore- 
! noon on the fourth day or March 131* 
the. return day of this citation. 

Witness, John C. I.eggat. Ksqu -r. 
First Judge of said Court, this 
| seventh day of February in the year 
thousand nine hundred and f<»rty- 


FOR SALE: Hudson Seal coat, 
remodelled in latest style, in ex- 
cellent condition. Size 16. $300. 
Also Stone Marten scarf. $200. 
Tel. Lasel 1 6155. f21 


FOR SALE: Lady’s bicycle. 
Roll-fast Victory model, nearly 
new. All accessories. Tel. Big. 
1135. 121 

FOB SALE In Newton Centre, 
I comb. Glonwood (black) coal and 
gas stove. $25. LAS. 2551 f21z 

i l BNITUBE FOB SALE 

Bedroom pieces, several living 
room pieces, including divan, al* 
son antiques. All in good condl* 
tion. Call Big. 5386. f21 2f 

COMMON \VF. VLTII OF 
M \ss Vl III *1 I Is 

Middle*' \. *s PROBATE COURT 

I In i ha 

r-xtatV of 

A ml raw II. Mar Ken* Ip 
late of Newton in said County. »!• 

COUHCd. 

A petition ha* been pierente.l 
said Court, praying that Mary > 
Lord of Newton in said County .1 
appointed administratrix >f said • 
tale without giving a surety on In 
bond. 

If y«u desire to object thereto 
or your attorney should file a vvnth 
appearance In mid Court at Can 
bridge before ten o’.-l.-.k m the f.-r. 
noon on the twenty -fifth dav of l-’el 
r uar.v 194t>. the leturu day of th 


, six. 

I.ORIXG V. JORDAN. 

(X) H4-21-28 Register. 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSAC lirSf.TTS 

, Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 
I To all persons Interested in the 
: estate of 

Jrmlnin >1. Mekenile 

ilso known as Jemima Maxwell Mc- 
Kenzie late of Newdon In said County, 
deceased. 

A petition lias been presented to 
salif Court. praying that Joseph 
Pierre Belllveau '( Cambridge In aald 
* County, public* administrator, be ap- 
pointed administrator of said estate 
I If you desire to object thereto you 
: or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
I bridge before ten o'clock, in the fore- 
I noon on ihe twenty-fifth day of Feb- 
j rtiary 1946. the return day of this 

w C. Leggat, 1 

l-'irst Judge of said Court, this 
thirtieth day of January In the *e.ir 
j one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
' six. 

I.ORIXG P JORDAN. 

(X) fT-tl-n Register 


Wi 


John 


la 


Ei 


III M MON Mill I It OF 
M \SSAt III Ni l is 

Middlesex. -- PROHA PE COl'l 

To all person* Interested In t 
j estate of 

lleilru in It. Sumner 

late of Newton in said County, . 
i ceased. 

The administrator* with the w 
• annexed of said estate have P'. *. 

to said Court for Allowance th' 
i second account 

i* If you .ic'ii e to able, t thereto v 
■ >r your attorney should file a 
| appearance In said Court at Ca 
bridge before ten - clock tn the f ’ 

I 1 Moon on the tweiitv seventh da\ 
l*‘ebruary EGG, 'tie return day of tl 


VK 


Ks. 


CARPETS 

12 ft. wide 
WILTON fi cured 
tone on tone 

27 inch wide nottle efTeet' 

ORIENTAL RUGS 

Direct from Importer 

Call 

W. H. ROBERTSON 

formerly with Paine 
Furniture Co. 
WATertown 4763 


IT MAY BE that Phe rug on which hg fry 1 * for 

.40 r%, pf-'-lo-. 

■' rhi Pin or 'MO-yv*' nqq 

for ve>f-«xpre*>4io n Though he rr.rjy be poor and illiterate he 

- . - 

’. St"-.*-, hi*. 

triumphs and h s fr*a s, n at .n words but *n jymbai-c design and 

luminous c afar. 


V/hen you oureKcu! ft GREGOP.IAN RUG, vdu veering 

if set t to c - - ■ g t ent both - our 

C'" 1 *' - .* and 

"> yaur chi drer S 


A FEW BKAMPLE8 


3 5 t 5 0 BIDJAR 

$135.00 m 

3.7 x 54 BIDJAR 

- 186 00 ! 

34 x 52 SAROUK 

150 00 

10.8 *14.1 MESHED 

075.00 

5 4 .10,7 KURDISTAN 

225 00 

84 .10,10 SARABAND 

550.00 ! 

4.8 * 66 TABRIZ 

150 00 

10 3 *18 6 KAZVIN 

157500 | 

9 10*1710 KAZVIN 

1500.00 

9.1 *12.2 KIRMAN 

975 00 

9.10x17.10 KIRMAN 

1775 00 

8 0 *20 8 SOUJ-BULAK 

1800.00 

AND IWANY OTHER8 


A Gregorian Rug today is an heirloom tomorrow 

Arthur T. Gregorian 

2306 Washington Street — Newton 

Lower Fat's 

Telephone BIGelow 2553 


( Opposite Groce Street) 




P. E. COWAN 

Carpenter ~ Roofer 
Contractor 

• PAINTING 

• REMODELING 
• MODERNIZING 

• REPAIRING 

181 Parker St.. Newton Centre 

Tel. BIGelow 5357 


Tel, STA. 471 1 All Work Guaranteed 

Conrad A. Tjernstrom 

Interior and Exterior Painting 
Paperhanging. Kalsomining 
19 Montfern Ave. Brighton 


PAINTING - PAPERHANGING 

INSIDE and OUTSIDE 

Ceilings IT hitened — Floors Re-Finished 

DEPENDABLE, EXPERT WORKMANSHIP 

ESTIMATES, samples submitted 

'o Obligation 

SEYMOUR SILVER 

16 Arlington Road West Newton 

Telephone LASell 0496 

ESTABLISHED 22 lEVHS L> THE NEWTONS 


F. A. B. KANGE BURNER 
SERVICE: Burners Serviced and 
| Vacuum cleaned. Prompt Serv- 
ice. Call Dec. 1494. f7-4t 

SPRING CLEANING? Is your 
i home becoming cluttered? Are 
'you short of storage space? I 
I will buy your odds and ends at 
• the current high dollar. Call 
LAS. 0750. K. Mullen. f!4-2t 


PAINTING- PAPERHANGING 
also Ceilings 

FLOORS Rt FINISHED 

EXCELLENT WORK 
ESTIMATES GIVEN • 

W. REYNOLDS 

BIGelow 27 II 


Interior 



Floors Rrflnlshed 
F.ipe rt!> Done 
Prompt Serviee 

HAROLD P. JOHNSON 

2.V Years In Brlmrnt 

Call BELmont 3667 


PAINTING 

PAPERHANGING 


INSIDE and 
OUTSIDE 


Cellinis Whitened 
Floors Sanded and 
Reflnished 


WALLPAPER REMOVED 
by ELECTRIC MACHINE 


first Clan I fork 
Remtenebla Prices 



FRANK E. O’DEA 

400 California St., NewtonviHe - BIG. 9661 


JOSEPH RICHARD 

FLOOR SANDING 
and REFINISHING 

Call WALtham 2821 -W 


Where to BUY IT, RENT IT, SELL IT, 
or HAVE IT REPAIRED 


Antiques 


Painting 


Complete Exterminating 
Service 

termites, ants, insects 

AND RODENTS 

JOS. E. LaGASSE CO. 

KEN. 2181 or BIG 3123 


HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

for antiques, silser. ftrir-a-ftrar 
china, (las*, pictures and furniture 
Cal' day or nl(ht 

M. MARCUS. BIG. 0843 

V.9 WALNUT STREET 
NEWTON VII t.E— or 
1871 Commonwealth Aso Brlibton 
Beacon '>**9* 


PAINTING & DECORATING 

hr 

Oeagle & Aucoin 

BIO. 0753 — LAS 4633 


it,. 1 , 1 * 1 . im i: i.-.-t 



Painting — Paperhangir 

Inside & Oat Floor. & C«ilin 

JOSEPH WRIGHT 

AUBl R.MJALE 
Shop DECatur 1308 
Res BIGelow 5305 

TS CRESCEM STREET 


Prinling 


JAMES F. HL’GHES 

Commercial and 80010(7 Prtaitms 
Istahllshod IS Years 

•*3 WAL.NL T ITRSKT 
NKWTO.NTILUI 
BIGelow I4!« 


I’itiini Funers 


PIANOS WANTED 

COMPLETE PIANO SERVICE 

LOUIS V HAEEER11EHL 

Newton Centre 

Tel Bigelow 1501 Bigelow 196? 


IHANC TUNING 

VAolh - Froofln* and aooaildlua 

J. W. TAPPER 

11 VHKH0EFN srNBCI 
NEtVrON UIGHI A.ND8 

LASell 1306— BIGelow 0443 

Roofers 


\\ p. LEAVITT SONS CO 

An? type uf HOOFING 
installed or repaired 
*9 PE A HI. ST.. NKVYION 
DKt alur 077H 
Newton a Oldeat Koolere 


PAGE EIGHT 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC. 


THURSDAY. FERRUARY, 21. 1946 


Lions Club Observe 
Scout Week 

By Marvin R. Gould 


high regard for your crew and speaker. Dolph Sanborski, Dlrec- 
i for you personally, the Newton tor of Intra-Mural Sports of Har- 
I Lions Club presents to your Ship vard College. Mr. Sanborski rc- 
this stand of color.'' lated some of his many expert- 

The skipper of Ship 18 accept- cnees as Coach, Athlete, and Offi- 
Thursday, February 14. was cd the colors and thanked the cial. As a token of the evening 
the occasion of a successful ban- Lions Club by replying. "King he was presented a bronze Lion 
quet held by the Newton Lions Lion and members of the New- by "the Club. 

Club at the Y.M.C.A. with Sea ton Lions Club, on behalf of the o 

Scout Ship 13. in honor of Scout ships complement. Ser Scout Gray Lady Training * 

w «*’ ,, ship 13 and myself. It gives me Class at Cns h in , 

Asa D. Blakeslce. King Lion great pleasure to accept this 
Aesop opened the meeting with stand of color from the Newton 
the singing of America and the ' Lions Club. I sincerely believe 
Salute to the Flag. The invo- it will long be a source of in- 
cation was then given hy the • splration to our members and 
Reverend Arthur Block of the it will symbolize for the boys 
Lutheran Church of the. New- . the friendship and kindness 
tons. After an excellent dinner, . which our sponsors have given 
Blakeslce introduced Jack Tap- our organization. We will on- 
per and Charlie Hall of the Lions deavor to be worthy of that 
Club who led in the singing of friendship." 
the Lions hymns, "Sailing.” j Cal Brown then introduced the 

"Father and Son Song," “New- 

ton Lions Club." "Mules, Ham com mon wf. ai.tii or 

& Eggs.” "O Lad of Mine." "Now mi.IiIIom x.'l U prohati: corna* Notice is hereby given that the 
Which One Do You Wish," "Li- To all peixMi- intorestr.i in tii. Board of Aldermen will hold pub- 
ons Roar." "End of Lions Day," of s , Knp , 0|#on lie hearings at City Hall, on 

"Don’t You Hear Those Lions i n- of Newt..,, in' v,i.i count. v. de- Monday. March 4. 1946. at 8:00 
Roar," "Ice Breaker Song," "I "a 1 "",', ha , h „„ p „ MnlM o’clock P. M. upon the following 
Want a Girl." and the "Bells of said Court r. r prntvite f a certain petitions under the provisions of 
St. Mary’s." j pl J!! po,t ir !f J° *.T ."'f ,B8 . t the General Laws and Revised 

Blakeslce then introduced the Bcrgiund -f Arlington m said county. Ordinances of the City, viz: 
head table guests who were: 1 pri '- vi ! 1? th . nt >!", bc appointed exo.ii- £88031. Soconv Vacuum Oil Com- 

tor thereof,, without giving n surety 


League of Women 
Voters Meet Monday 


The regular meeting of the 
Newton League of Women Vot- 
ers will be held Monday, Febru- 
ary 25th at 2 p.m. at the home 
j of Mrs. Mark F. Losses. 33 Han- 
, cock avenue. Newton Centre. 
. Guest speakers from the Massa- 
The need fot Gray Ladles to chusetts League Mrs. Moses Lu- 
serve in our government hospl- r j 0 , president; Mrs. Malcolm 
tals is again stressed." says Mrs. Nichols, vice-president: Mrs. Wil- 
P. Edward Eden. Co-chairman i iam Minot, chairman; Miss 
Volunteer Special Services. New- Nancy Evarts, executive sccre- 
ton Red Cross. "In order to more tary. will present their subject: 


CITY OF NEWTON 
City Clerk’s Office 

NOTICE OF BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN HEARINGS 
March 4, 1946 


Marvin R. Gould. Bill Woodruff, 
of International News Service; 
Lee Frazer, of the Lions Inter 
national; Chaplain Arthur Block; 
F. Brittain Kennedy. C&mmis- 
sioner of Scouting of the Norum- 
bega Council: Charles Hall. 
Chairman of Sponsors Commit- 
tee of Ship 13: Calvin R. Brown. 
Zone Chairman of the Lions In- 
ternational; Abbott L. Roden- 
hiser. Skipper of Ship 13; Allan 
McIntyre. Commodore of the 


tr> object thereto yoi 
y should ill- ,i wriltci 


on ills bond. 

If you desire 

or your attorney should life a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- I 
bridge before ten o'cl.vk In the fore- 
noon on the thirteenth dav of March 
1946. the return day ..f this citation. I 
Witness. John I-eggat. Ksquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this six- I 
teentli day of February In the year 1 
ne thousand nine hundred and forty- 


six. 


JORDAN. 

Register. 


CITY OF NEWTON 


Notice is hereby given that 


oNHarvard. and D °' Ph Sanborski the Board of Aldermen will hold 


Ship 
a set 


a public hearing at City Hall, on 
Monday, March 4. 1946. upon pe- 
tition of the Middlesex & Boston 
sponsors, the street Railway Company for per- 

slee who »,H. mU buscs on Al , burn g t 

from Washington St. to Com- 
monwealth Ave., Wd. 4. 

Attest: 

FRANK' M. GRANT. 

City Clerk. 

Advertisement 

21. 1916 


The compliment of 
were then presented 
colors by their 
Lions Club. Blakeslee, who made 
the presentation, stated: 

"Skipper and men of Ship 13: 

You and your sponsors have 
done a lot of sailing these past 
two years. Sometimes the weath- 
er has been pretty thick and 
we have battled heavy seas but Fel,r u 

wc have never been in distress. commonwealth of 

Time has trained your crew and . . m ass \< iii sktt.s 

‘heir experience under a deter- *«•£, P ,S!5 TO 

mined Skipper has brought your truf,; c-tit. under the will of 
ship safely to port with honors, u, „r ’in "Eounty. dr. 

lour sponsors are proud of the * for the benefit of Isabel s. 
Ship’s complement and the fine ] Mld h „ 

seamanship that has been demon- ‘ented m said Court for allowance 
strated. As a token 


pany. for permit to alter exist- 
ing Gasoline Selling Station at 
1100 Beacon Street. Ward 5: to 
demolish present building and 
erect a new building to be 
used for an office and sales 
room, with 2-car garage for 
use as a lubritorium. Also to 
increase storage capacity of 
kerosene, lubricating oils and 
anti-freeze mixtures to 1500 
gallons to be stored in metal 
containers above - ground; 
pumps, lights and driveways 
to be as shown on plan filed 
and made a part of this peti- 
tion. No increase in gasoline 
storage capacity. 

#88032. Harold E. Wilson, for 
permit to erect and operate a 
2-car Lubritorium at 238 Wal- 
nut Street. Ward 2. in connec- 
tion with Gasoline Selling 
Station. 

#88034. Louis J. Leone, for per- 
mit to conduct and maintain a 
Repair Shop. 2-car capacity at 
216 Adams Street, Ward 2. 


•Work of the State and Nation- 
al League in relation to the New- 
ton League." Mrs. William K. 
Wells will be in charge of hos- 
pitality with the following as- 
sisting her: Mrs. Thomas Do- 
Wan. Mrs. George R. Kent, Mrs. 
Walter Hurley, Mrs. Asher J. 
Shuffer, and Mrs. John S Carter. 
Mrs. Earl B. Millard, president 
of the Newton League, will pre- 
side. 


quickly meet this nerd a simpli- 
fied training course is offered to 
women between the ages of 
25-50.” 

A new Gray Lady class starts 
at Cushing General Hospital, 
Framingham, Monday, March 4th 
and continues each Monday and 
Thursday evening thereafter for 
three weeks, from 7:30 to 9:30. 

Personal interviews are re- 
quested and appointment may be 
made by calling the Red Cross 
Chapter House, Lasoll 6000, or 
Mrs. Eden at Big. 3617. 


COMMON WF AI.TII OF 
M ASM AC HUSK I TS 

MUtdloxox, ph. PHOHATK COURT 
To nil pci-HoiiH Interested In »h«* 
estate of 

Mnrviiri'l I'llen Curry 

smuetlinrs known nx Margaret K. 
Carry Into of Newton In said County, 
demined. 

A petition hue been precluded to 
hu I d Court, praying thnt John F, | 
Carey >>f Newton In said County, b- 
appointed administrator of said r- 
tatr, without giving a surety on hi 
bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you i 
or your attorney should file a written ' 
appearance in xald Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the eighth day of March 1946, 
the return day of this citation. 

WltnecH, John C. Uegg.it. Inquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this four- 
teenth day of Fehruafy In the year 
no thousand nine hundred and forty-, 


six. 


(N) f21-2S-ni7 


LORING P. 


FOIt AT OF \ ItM I \ 1ST It A TO It'S 
N OTIC F. TO ( ItF.IHTOItS OF 
INSOLVENT ESTATE 
Estate of John .1. O'Reilly late of 
Newton In the County of Middlesex, 
deceased. Intestate, represented In- 
solvent. 

Til I ! Probate Court for said County 
will receive and examine all claims 
of creditor-' against the estate of said 
John J. O'Reilly and notice Is hereby 
given that six months from the thir- 
teenth day of February A.D. 1946. 
are allowed to creditors to present 
and prove their claims against said 
estate, and that the Court will re- 
ceive and examine the claims of 
creditors at Cambridge, on the eigh- 
teenth day of March 1946, at ten 
o'clock In the forenoon, and at Cam- 
bridge on the fifteenth day of August 
19-16. at ten o'clock In the forenoon. 

CHARLOTTE R O'REILLY, 
<N) f21-28-m7 Administratrix. 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 


Petition to Foreclose Tax Lien 


W. Newton Women 
To Show Work at 
Needlework Exhibit 

— o— 

Mrs. Charles Spencer, J^. and 
Mrs. Quincy W. Wales of West 
NeWton rft-e among those invited 
to exhibit at the 13th Annual 
Loan Exhibition of Contemporary 
Needlework being held at the 
Women’s Educational and Indus- 
trial Union of Boston, 264 Boyl- 
ston street, during the week of 
February 28th through March 


6th. The Exhibit is featuring the 
work of Mrs. Charles T. Crocker 
of Fitchburg whose copies of j 
Audubon prints worked in many 
materials and with many kinds 
of stitches are considered very 
fine, and Mrs. F. Dewey Everett 
of New York City who is sending 
some very beautiful pieces copied 
from Chinese Embroideries. 
Among articles shown are chairs. 


benches, rugs, wall harfglngs, pil- 
lows and pictures as well as 
small cushions, hags and even 
shoes. The Exhibit Is arranged 
by the Needlework Committee of 
the Women’s Educational and In- 
dustrial Union of which Mrs. B. 
Preston Cutler of South Hamil- 
ton is chairman. It Is open from 
10:30 to 5 o'clock, and the admis- 
sion of 30c includes tax. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 
lo nil persons Interested In the 
estate of 

Wllllnni I’. Wallace 

of Newton In said County, a minor, 
an insane person. 

The guardian of said William P. 
Wallace h«s presented to said Court 
for allowance her second account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the eleventh day of March 
UR6. the return day of this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggnt, Enquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this four- 
teenth day of February in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and fortv- 
slx. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

(N) f21-28-m7 Register. 


THE COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 

Petition to Foreclose Tax Lien 


(Seal) No. 27739 

To All Whom It May Concern, 
and to John N. Hodge and Mrs. 
John N. Hodge, now or formerly 
of Newton in the County of Mid 
dlesex and said Commonwealth, 
or their heirs, devisees or legal 
representatives. 

Whereas, a petition has been 
presented to said Court by the 
City of Newton, a municipal cor 


FRANK M. GRANT. 

Advprtisompnt City Clerk, poration, located in the County 

Feb. 21, 1946. of Middlesex and said Common- 


object thereto you 
! or your attorney should file a written 
| appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before fen o'clock in the fore 


COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSAt HI SETTS „ 

< esex, ss. PROBATE COURT noon on the eleventh day of March 


persons interested 


To all 
estate of 

Margaret Ruth Brady Farrell 

late of Albany. | n the State of New 
York, deceased. 

The executors of the will of said 

e presented I 

for allowance their first account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
" r your attorney should file a written 
appearance n said Court At Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
• Boon on :hf twenty-seventh day of 
February 1946, the return dav of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. I.eggat, Esquire, 
Fiiv Judge of sai i Court, this 
thirty-first day of January in the 
> ear <o <■ thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LORING P. JORDAN, 

(N) 17-14-21 Register. 


the return day of this citation. 
Witness. John >' Leggnt. Esquire. 
First Judge of siid Court, this 
eighteenth day < f February In the 
year one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

<N) f21-2S-m7 Register. 


tOMMtiNWKM.nl O 
M ASS Will sKTTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE 

To all persons Interested 
estate of 

Ruth G. Olhausen 

.•ton in said Count 


wealth, to foreclose all rights of 
redemption from the tax lien 
proceedings described in said pe- 
tition in and concerning a cer- 
tain parcel of land situate in said 
City of Newton in the County of 
Committee On Claims and Rules Middlesex and in said Common 
Feb. 18. 1946 wealth, bounded and described 


HEARING NOTICE FROM 
OFFICE OF CITY CLERK 
NEWTON 

CITY OF NEWTON 


WHEREAS, Petition and rec- 
ommendations have been filed 
with the Board of Aldermen of 


in said petition as follows: 

About 590 square feet of land 
on Tudor Terrace, being more 


the City of Newton as defined particularly described in Section 


ted. 


'OL'RT 
In the 

de- 


in list attached hereto for the 
modification of District Bound- 
ary Lines as established by "Zon- 
ing Ordinance. Chapter XXXVIII. 
as amended." and for amend- 
ment of the Zoning Ordinance, 
WHEREAS. Said Board of 
Aldermen intend to grant said 


WELSH 


MAR. 2nd 
6:30 P.M. 

CHIPMAN HALL 
Tremont Temple 

ST. DAVIDS DAY 

Banquet & Entertainment 

Tickets X’l.fMi - Phunr Reservation 
U. J. Brown. Sec'y KEN. 0331-LAS. ACID 


petition has been presented t 
*»<•> " r ' i 1 ""' -bate of a act, in petitions, it is therefore 

Instrument purporting to bc the last 

Will Of t-air) dot-eased by Atlee L. 

Percy ,.f Newton in said County, 
praying that he be appointed execu- 
tor thereof, without giving a surety 
on his bond. 


ORDERED. That a hearing be 
had thereon and that Monday the 
18th day of March, 1946, at 8:30 
o’clock in the evening, at the 

If you desire to object thereto you pi . „ , Mnwtnn ho- 

or vnqr attorney should file a written '-tty Mall in saia iNCWton, ne 
appearance in said Court at Cam- fore the Committee on Claims 

bridge l>«for, t,n o’clock in the for, ; d R ] f th BoaI , d of Aldcr . 

tho same is hereby "'‘i? by or for , you ; your ,^ fau ‘ t 
assigned as the time and place ! , wl11 ^ ported, the said poll- 

, , ,, . . • . , , firm will ho taken as confessed 

for hearing all parties interested 


noon on the twenty-seventh day of 
February 1946. the return day of this men. be and the same 
cititlon. 

Witness. John C. I.eggat. Enquire. 

First Judge <>f said '"our, this 
second day of February In the year 
■ me thousand «lne hundred and forty- 
six. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

(N)f7-!4-21 Register. 


40. Block 1A. Lot 22A of As- 
sessors’ Plans. 

If you desire to make any ob- 
jection or defense to said peti- 
tion you or your attorney must 
file a written appearance and an 
answer, under oath, setting forth 
clearly and specifically your ob- 
jections or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 
the Recorder of said Court in 
Boston (at the Court House), on 
or before the eleventh day of 
March next. 

Unless your appearance is 


tion will be taken as confessed 
and you will be forever barred 


therein. It is further , 

ORDERED, that two weeks frOm , COntesUn , g . Sa , id ,, pCtlU0n or 


previous to said date of hearing, 
due notice of said intention and 


any decree entered thereon. 

And in addition to the usual 


SCREENS 

.Wood or Metal 

Rewired or New 
Porches Enclosed 

Bronze Wire 
Now Available 

Place Orders NOW 
For Guaranteed Delivery 

Home Specialties 
Company 

Newton Centre BIG. 3900 


TH£ BEST 
/S THE CHEAPEST 


of said hearing be given by f rv , lce of th . is notice as required 
notice of the same posted in the by law. it is ordered that the 


/ 




Gives you the best in all three! 

★ OIL BURNERS 
* FUEL OIL 
★ BURNER SERVICE 

Call com. 3400 or 
LAS. 032S 

PETROLEUM 

HEAT & POWER COMPANY 

419 BoylsLon St.. Boston 


vicinity of the proposed change; 
and that further notice be given 
by publication in the Newton 
Graphic on February 22. 1946, Newton Graphic a newspaper 
under the provisions of Chapter published in said Newton. 


foregoing citation bc published 
forthwith once each week for 
three successive weeks in the 


Witness, John E. Fenton, Es- 
quire, Judge of said Court, this 
fifth day of February in the year 
nineteen hundred and forty-six. 

Attest with seal of said Court. 

Robert E. French, 

Recorder. 


AWNINGS 

NEW or RE-COVERED 

II r halt- a lain r atflerliun *»/ pre-trut colon at preterit 
Order now and pay after installation in spring 

SHADES VENETIAN BLINDS 


WEDDING CANOPIES 


WEATHERSTRIPPING 


40ME SPECIALTIES COMPANY 

NEWTON CENTRE BIB:!ow 3900 


wmxm 


^NEWTON EiKIRIC APPLIANCE (0. 


HtY/ 

FRiVATE PPoetlTT t y 




- 

wt *novn rr - i*-' 

AND v-.f. WANT J ‘ 
TO bt PRIVATE.' / 


> the private opt ion nt 



:fS 


jr, T 

iklLi 


sprrn; 

NEWT 0 H ELECT P 1 C 
LAE ELL 4931 





T-V,. . -14 VKILL H' 

TVLfclO bCKOPTa 
TO PLEASE TOO r-r- 




13 



320 of the Acts of the General 
Court of 1941. 

Read and adopted, 

FRANK M. GRANT, 

City Clerk. 

List of Petitions and recom- 
mendations accompanying Order 
of Hearing for Modification of Joseph W. Bartlett, Esq. 
District Boundary Lines and 75 Federal Street 
amendment of Zoning Ordinance Boston. Mass, 
shown below: for the Petitioner 

Petition of United Equipment 'N<fH- 2 i- 2 s 
Corporation & David Nassif Co., 
and recommendation of Commit- 
tee on Claims & Rules of tho 
Board of Aldermen, for chang- • 
ing real estate from Private 
Residence District to Manufac- 
turing District, land on easterly 
side of Needham St., Wd. 5. 
bounded southerly by City of 
Newton Water Works land, west- 
erly hy existing Manufacturing 
Zone, northerly by Columbia 
Ave., easterly by Kenneth St., 
northerly by Jaconnet St., east- 
erly by a line 500 feet from and 
parallel to Needham St., 

Recommendations of Commit- 
tee on Claims & Rules of the 
Board of Aldermen for amend- 
ment of the Zoning Ordinance 
giving the Board of Aldermen 
authority to grant permits for 
the erection and maintenance of 
service buildings and green- 
houses in cemeteries dedicated 
to the burial of the dead, pro- 
vided they are used entirely for 
the private uses of the cemetery 
and not for business uses. 

Attest : 

FRANK M. GRANT. 

City Clerk. 

Notice is hereby given by the 
Planning Board that it will hold 
a public hearing on the proposed 
amendments to the Zoning Or- 
dinance of the City of Newton 
described in the foregoing notice 
land at the same time and place, 
l under the provisions of Chapter 
320 of the Acts of the General 
* Court of 1941. 

Attest: 

\\ 1LLAKD 3. PRATT. 

Clerk, Planning Board. 

I 


(Seal) No. 27860 

To All Whom It May Concern, 
and to Any persons interested in 
the George M. Briggs Construc- 
tion Company, formerly having 
a place of business in Newton, 
in the County of Middlesex and 
said Commonwealth, who have 
not released their interest in the 
land hereinafter described; 
George M. Briggs, formerly of 
said Newton, deceased, and Mary 
E. Briggs, residence unknown, 
or their heirs, devisees or legal 
representatives. 

Whereas, a petition has been 
presented to said Court by the 
City of Newton, a municipal cor- 
poration, located in the County 
of Middlesex and said Common- 
wealth, to foreclose all rights of 
redemption from the tax lien 
proceedings described in said pe- 
tition in and .concerning a cer- 
tain parcel of land situate in said 
City of Newton in the County 
of Middlesex and in said Com- 
monwealth, bounded and de- 
scribed in said petition as fol- 
lows: 

About 148 square feet of land 
on Clark terrace, being more 
particularly described in Section 
25, Block 3, Lot 2 of Assessors’ 
Plans. 

If you desire to make any ob- 
jection or defense to said peti- 
tion you or your attorney must 
file a written appearance and an 
answer, under oath, setting forth 
j clearly and specifically your ob- 
jections or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 
the Recorder of said Court in 
Boston (at the Court House), on 
or before the eleventh day of 
March next. 

Unless your appearance is 
filed by or for you, your default 
will be recorded, the said peti- 
tion will be taken as confessed 
and you will be forever barred 
from contesting said petition or 
any decree entered thereon. 

And in addition to the usual 
service of this notice as required 
by law, it is ordered that the 
foregoing citation be published 
forthwith once each week for 
three successive weeks in the 
Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in said Newton. 

Witness, John E. Fenton, Es- 
quire, Judge of said Court, this 
fifth day of February in the year 
nineteen hundred and forty-six. 

Attest with seal of said Court. 

Robert E. French, 

Recorder. 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Esq., 

75 Federal Street 
Boston, Mass, 
for the Petitioner 
(X) (14*21-28 


tO.M.MOJnVKALTH OK 
M ASS A LIU' SKITS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATES COURT | 
To all persons interested in the ! 
estate of 

William Harrison McLeod 

late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 7 . 

A petition has been presented t<> 
sold Court for probate of a certain | 
Instrument purporting to ho the last 
will of said deceased by Berta Han- 
son McLeod of Newton in snid 
County, praying that she he appointed 
executrix thereof, without giving a 
surety on her bond. • 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the thirteenth day or March 
1946. the return day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. I.eggat. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, tills four- 
teenth day of February in the ycat 
one thousand nine hundred and fortv- 
six. 

LORINO P. JORDAN. 

(N) f21-2S-ni7 Register 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 
To all persons interested in tho 
estate of 

Nellie C. Temple 

also known ns Helen J. Temple hit 
of Newton In said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented t* 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to he the last 
will of said deceased by Thomas F. 
Temple. Second, and Edith Johnson 
Clark of Newton in said County, i 
praying that they be appointed ex- 
ecutors thereof, without giving a 
surety on their bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you . 
or your attorney should file a witten 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on ‘the eleventh day of March 
194C. the return dny of this citation. 

Witness, John C. I.eggat, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this fif- 
teenth dny of February in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
six. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

(N) f 2 l-28-m7 Register. 



Treasure Chests in 
Pigeonholes 

Not- all treasure chests are buried. In fact thou- 
sands of them arc right nearby . . . tucked away in 
the desks of farsighted men and women to whom a 
deposit book from a mutual savings bank now 
means as much as discovering a pirate's cache of 
gold doubloons and precious jewels. 

By opening a savings account and adding to it 
regularly each week or each month, your dollars 
will soon grow and multiply into an amount suffi- 
cient to make many of your dreams come true. Sys- 
tematic saving is thfc key to fulfilling such ambi- 
tions as owning your own home, travel to foreign 
lands, a college education for your children, and 
financial security when you retire. 

As experts in planning budgets — in systematic 
saving — we would bc glad to open a savings ac- 
count for you and help you with financial problems 
such as temporary loans, financing repairs on your 
home, or the possibility of saving money on life 
insurance premiums. 



NEWTON 

Savings Bank 


286 Washington Street at Newton Corner 
Newton's Oldest Bank 


I F#brtnr> :3«S 


WRIGHT-FOSTER 

Incorporated 

DeSOTO- PLYMOUTH 


Dealers 


Or dvr Your !Seto Cur Now — You May Get 
Delivery Much Sooner Than You Expect 

WANTED TO BUY 

USED CARS 


ANY MAKE OR YEAR 

r tirirnlly nrnlril for returning \ptrrana 


IMMEDIATE SERVICE 

Front Wheel Aligning • Jrake Work • Motor Tune-up 
General Repairs 


We are distributors for United States tires — 
Many sizes now available 

A Complete Line of Ualteriet Mobile Cat • Oil • Imbrication 

780 BEACON STREET - NEWTON CENTRE 

Telephone DECatur 0880 


TIRE RATIO 

No more certificates! Once again every 
one is eligible to buy, and soon you'll 

NING ENDS 

be able to drive in and get immediate 
delivery on new tires for your car. 

PRODUCTION OUTLOOK AT 

p. _ — « - Tire manufadurers have been unable to fill the great 

1 WkM C* ET need for new passenger car tires. In case we do not 

Li 1 v Best have the right size tire for your car, we should be able 

to get It soon. Come in for full information. 



HERE’S WHY you’ll want the 

IHSwi' ■ l : 5 } u ■ i H 

\m 1 1 t i PH 

B. F. Goodrich Silvertown 

OUTWEARS 

IM ft. f f if H 

m\ ] CliMSblai MclimbiS Mi 1H 

11 1«WI nisi; if J fl 

PREWAR 

TIRES! 

wd yH 


It has b«en proved. More than 2,000 tests and 
nearly 17,000,000 miles of the toughest kind of 
road service showed that this new B. F. Goodrich 
Silvertown will Outwear Prewar natural rubber 
Tires. 

New, better rubber. B.F. Goodrich has de- 
veloped s rubber that'* far better than ordinary 
synthetics. It helps the new Silvertown wear better 
and run cooler. It has greater resistance to cracking 
— and actually stands bruising and damage from 
accidents better. 

Tire body 35% stronger. An entirely new. 
stronger cord is used, more of these cords are used 
in the top ply, an extra shock-absorbing breaker strip 


is included. The result: a body that if 35% stronger 
for additional resistance to bruises, extra blowout 
protection. 

Flatter tread covers more ground. Called 

the "road level" tread, it puts more rubber on the 
road, permits all the tread to share the wear. Result: 
a further increase in mileage, less scuffing, better 
distribution of weight, better traction, more safety 
oo the turns. 

Plus 3 years 1 EXTRA experience. Three yea. 
before any other manufacturer, B. F.'Goodrich sold 
tires containing synthetic rubber to American car 
owners. The extra know-how piled up in these years 
is reflected in the new B.F. Goodrich Silvertown. 


EXTRA MILEAGE TIRE RECAPPING 

6.00-16 . . . $7.00 

WE LOAN YOU TIRES WHILE YOURS ARE 
BEING RECAPPED 

Service Charge - $1.00 each 

B RAM’S 

Battery and Tire Service 

252 Walnut Street -:- Newtonville 

Call LASell 083S 

Hear "Delect and Collect" every Thursday oh ABC at 9l30 p- IW. BS.T. 


B.EGoodrich 

▼ IRES 



+ 


YOUR Red Cross MUST CARRY ON . . . 


/ 


+ 



THESE WHEELOCK COLLEGE SOPHOMORES, Helen Cous- 
ens of Newton Centre, right, and Dorothy Bone of West 
Roxbury, are learning the mysteries of connecting door- 
bells and electric lights to switches as part of their prepara- 
tion for teaching science to primary children. Wiring a 
doli's house in the schoolroom is a project fascinating to 
boys and girls alike, and through it fundamental prin- 
ciples are readily learned. 

Miss Cousens is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Foster 
Coqsens of 984 Beacon street. On Washington's Birthday 
Wheelock College held an all-day open house with reg- 
ular classes given as usual to girls who plan to teach 
nursery school, kindergarten and the first three grades. 
Dr. Winifred E. Bain is president of the college on Pilgrim 
road and the Riverway. 


Two Noted Speakers 
At Central Club 
Monday Evening 

— o — 

The Central Club will hold its 
monthly meeting, on Monday eve- 
ning at the Central Congrega- 
tional Church, Newtonville. 

Following a catered dinner at 
6:30 the club will hear Norman 
Harris, instructor in Zoology at 
Belmont Hill School. His sub- 
ject will be “Snakes." Harris is 
(Continued on Page 5) 

o 

Rep. Rawson Files 
Rill on Reporting 
Election Returns 

— o — 

Representative George E. Raw- 
non of Newton has filed a new 
bill, House 1530, as chairman of 
the Committee on Election Laws. 
This bill changes the procedure 
for reporting election returns 
from representative districts 
composed of more than one 
town. At present the town 
clerks of the towns in a repre- 
sentative district are required to 
meet to canvass the votes for 
representative and notify the 
% candidate of his election. Under 
this bill the city and town clerks 
shall transmit the election re- 
(Continued on Page 5) 


NO COAL? 
BURN WOOD! 

Slab wood cut in fur- 
nace lengths delivered 
in your cellar. 

Emergency Orders Filled 

i/ 2 Cord $11.00 

Maine Wood Co., Inc. 

TRO. 8226 


EXPERT 

CLOCK REPAIRING 

Electric, apring or weight. 
Any type, foreign or domett- 
tic. Alarm Clocks, (any con- 
dition). Immediate service. 

SINGLETON 

504 WATERTOWN STREET 
NEWTONVILLE 

BIG clow 4647 


Ruth Rums, Area 
Treasurer for 
Easter Seal Sale 

— o — 

Miss Ruth Burns of Newton 
Center has been named area 
treasurer for the Newton, Wal- 
tham areas for the EasteV Seal 
Sales campaign of the Bay State 
Society for the Crippled and 
Handicapped. The campaign for 
the sale of these seals will be 
conducted between March 21 and 
April 21, and Newton-Waltham 
Bank & Trust Company, Newton 
Center, will be the local rep/s 
itory. 

The Bay State Society, whose 
president is Parker Trowbridge 
of Worcester, last year sold more 
than ten million Easter Seals. 
The entire proceeds of the sale 
were devoted to the care and re- 
(Continued on Page 7) 

Police Lieutenant 
Moan to Retire 

Lt. Edward A. Moan, night 
platoon commander of the New- 
ton Police Department, will re- 
tire on a pension on March 17. 
As a veteran of World War I, Lt. 
Moan is eligible under the pro- 
visions of the Veterans Retire- 
ment Law to retire after com- 
pleting 30 years in the service 
of the city. 

Lt. Moan, joined the Newton 
Police Department as a reserve 
officer in 15^15 and was appointed 
a regular patrolman in 1916. In 
(Continued on Page 5) 


Dr. Charles H. Veo 

(D.M.D. HARVARD UNIVERSITY) 

DENTAL SURGEON 

Registered In Mass., Maine, 
and London, Eng. 

— Also — 

Member American Dental Assoc. 

76 Otis St. Newtonville 

HIGelow 1033 


INTERIOR and EXTERIOR 

PAINTING 

and 

PAPERHANGING 


Plan To Enlarge Y.M.CJl.'s Camp 
Frank A. Day in Brookfield 

Plans for nine new cabins at Camp Frank A. Day in Brook- 
field to replace tents for Junior boys, a much enlarged play space 
for campers, and headquarters for the Junior Head Counsellor, 
were among the plans announced for Camp at the Annual Reunion 
Dinner last Saturday evening at the Newton Y.M.C.A. Henry 
T. Dunkcr, chairman of the Camp Committee, was tdast master. 

Frank M. “Doc” Simmons, whof^ 
will start his second year as di- 
rector, was master of ceremonies 
for the evening program. About 
200 parents, campers, and friends 
attended the dinner. The feat- 
ures of the evening included the 
showing of beautiful colored 
slides which were taken by Bur- 
ton Woodward at camp last sum- 
mer, and an entertainment by 
Elliott Smith, outstanding local 
ventriloquist and magician. 

In announcing new plans for 
the cabins and expanded play 
space, Harold B. Gores pointed 
out that this was part of a long 
range program by the camp com- 
mittee to modernize the camp to 
make it one of the outstanding 
boys camping institutions in the 
state. The cabins will be ready 
for the campers for the 1946 
season. 

“Doc" Simmons is surround- 
ing himself with a group of staff 
men and leaders of the highest 
calibre. Reginald E. “Smitty” 

Smith will again supervise the 
waterfront, and Chef and Mrs. 

Fred L. Brown, the popular heads 
of the food department, will 
again be on hand this year. Other 
appointments will be announc- 
ed shortly. 

(Continued on Page 5) 



Newton Man Joins 
Roston Stock Co. 



MRS. VIRGINIA McKINLEY 

Mrs. McKinley to 
Speak in West 
Newton, March 13 

— 0 — 

The story that lies back of Mrs. 
Virginia Peirson McKinley who 
speaks in Newtonville soon, is 
one which few, if any, American 
women can match, for it includes 
the tale of a perilous game of 
hide and seek with the Japanese 
army in the jungles and moun- 
tain reaches of a Philippine is- 
land for over two years, with 
final escape by submarine to Aus- 
(Continued on Page 5) 


EDMUND M. MacCLOSKEY 

The only stock company in 
America, with a professional 
company of New York actors is 
right in Newton's front yard. At 
famous Brattle Hall, Harvard 
Square, for 72 weeks, the Boston 
Stock Company has ben giving a 
new Broadway play every week. 
Hundreds of Newton residents 
have not missed a single show all 
season. 

In order to introduce this well 
known acting company to many 
other Newton theatre-goers, the 
management is inviting many 
prominent Newton people to next 
week’s play. 

(Continued on Page 5) 

Auxiliary Post, JWV, 
Donate Overbed 
Tables to Hospital 

— o — 

The formal presentation of 10 
metal overbed tables donated by 
the Newton Ladies’ Auxiliary, 
Post 211, JWV, was held Wed- 
nesday at the Waltham Regional 
Hospital. 

(Continued on Page 5) 


The Newti 

)N Graphic 

if 

NEWTON'S LEADING NEWSPAPER - ESTABLISHED 1872 


VOL. LXXIII. No. 22. 


NEWTON, MASS., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1946 


Single Copleu 5c; S2..V) per Year 


Nat. Rank's Centre 
Office to Have 
New Quarters 

The Newton National Bank 
announces the completion of ar- 
rangements for occupying new 
quarters for its Newton Centre 
office. 

A long term lease has been 
taken by the bank on the prop- 
erty at 1221 and 1223 Centre 
street at the corner of Pelham 
street. 

Extensive alterations will be 
made to the building including 
a new front. The interior will 
be completely remodeled as mod- 
ern banking quarters. A new 
vault with safety deposit facili- 
ties will also be installed. 

The growth of the Newton 
Centre office of the Newton Na- 
tional Bank has made necessary 
these new and larger quarters. 

It is expected that the remod- 
eling will be completed and the 
bank will occupy the building 
early in 1947. 

Jean Ferguson 
Becomes Exec. Sec. 
Community Council 



JOHN F. KENNEDY 


Changes in Teaching 
i Staff Announced 


Major Walter M. Taylor who 
recently returned to the teaching 
staff of the Newton High School 
after having served wi*th the 
Army has been recalled to duty 
and has been granted further mil- 
itary leave. 

Major Charles Chase has re- 
| turned to the high school as 
1 teacher of industrial arts. Major 
Chase was the second one of the 
Newton High School faculty who 
entered the service. Lt. Col. 
Wheeler Merriam who was the 
first member to enter the serv- 
ice, is still in the Army. 

The School Department an- 
nounces that Barbara R. O’Con- 
nell, a student at the Boston Un- 
(Continued on Page 5) 

‘Capi. Applejack' 

At Central Club 
March 1 and 2 

The annual show of the Central 
Club of Newtonville will be held 
on Friday and Saturday even- j 
ings, March 1 and March 2, in ! 
Woodward Hall of the Central 
Congregational Church. 

The club, is presenting this 
year the immensely popular 
Broadway hit of the early 20’s, | 
“Captain Applejack" by Walter 
(Continued on Page 5) 



PICTURES FRAMED 
MIRRORS RESILVERED 
BROKEN GLASS REPLACED 

NEWTON GLASS CO. 

302 Centre Street, Newton 
BIQelow 1268 


M 


I L L 


N O . 

Buster St.. C. Dedham 
Phone DED. 0530 


2 


REMNANTS 

W oolen, Cotton , Rayon , Drapery 
Open 9-5, Daily j Sal.. 9-12 


MISS JEAN FERGUSON 
Miss Jean Estelle Ferguson of 
104 Eliot avenue, West Newton 
will assume her duties on March 
4 as Executive Secretary of the 
Newton Community Council it is 
announced by Harold B. Gores, 
Chairman of the Council. 

Last October Miss Ferguson 
returned from 15 months over- 
sas with the American Red Cross. 
She was stationed in Perth, Aus- 
tralia serving with the United 
States Navy at the submarine 
base of the 7th ‘Fleet. Previous 
to her service with the American 
Red Cross Miss Ferguson was 
secretary to Lt. Col. Wilhite at 
the Boston Ordnance District. 

Miss Ferguson, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Ferguson, 
is a graduate of the Newton High 
School and The Erskine School 
of Boston. 


Holy Name Society, 
Our Lady's Church, 
To Hear Kennedy 

— o — 

The Holy Name Society of Our 
Lady’s Help of Christians Church 
of Newton will hold its March 
meeting on March 10. The meet- 
ing will be held in the High 
School Auditorium, Newton, at 
8:00 o'clock in the evening. The 
chairman of the Program Com- 
mittee, Joseph A. Callahan, is 
pleased to announce that the prin- 
cipal speaker for the evening will 
be John F. Kennedy, a former 
naval officer of World War 2 and 
the son of the famous former Am- 
bassador to England, Joseph P. 
Kennedy. Mr. Kennedy is a 
graduate IB. A. Cum Laude) 
(Continued on Page 5) 
o 

John F. Brown 
Appointed 
Library Trustee 

— o — 

Announcement was made this 
week by Mayor Paul M. Goddard 
of the appointment of John F. 
Brown of 360 Central street, Aub- 
urndale as a member of the Board 
of Trustees of the Newton Free 
Library to take the place of Dr. 
Guy N. Winslow, president of 
Lasell Junior College, who has 
resigned. 

Mr. Brown has resided in Aub- 
urndale for 25 years, has served 
as chairman of the Auburndale 
Residential Division of the Com- 
munity Chest and as a member 
of the Special Gifts Committee 
of the Red Cross. He is chair- 
man of the Residential Division 
of the Community Chest Drive 
for 1946. He was born in Minne- 
apolis, August 10. 1S91 and is 
a flour and food broker. 

The appointment of Mr. Brown 
will come before the Newton 
Board of Aldermen for confirm- 
ation on March 4. 


1946 Red Cross Fund 

Campaign Starts March 1 

Newton's Quota Is $90,000- 1500 
Volunteers Participate in Drive 

The Red Cross 1946 Fund Drive is ready to start Friday, 
March 1st, with 1.600 volunteers participating. Newton's quota 
is $90,000. $60,000 of which goes to the National Fund and 
$30,000 is for Chapter needs. 

* The National Fund takes care 

| of such service to the Armed 
Forces and Veterans as hospital 
and convalescent service; home 
service assistance; emergency fi- 
nancial aid; morale-building sup- 
plies and special welfare and 

— o recreational service. It sends 

Although the actual fighting is emergency relief and supplemen- 
over there is still much to be done tar Y a ‘^ * n f QrTn °f food, 

for our soldiers, both here and c | 0 ‘| 1 , ln * and raedicaI “ 

. , _ civilians in war-ravang<--d areas, 

abroad. The Amencan Red Cross At n ome in th( , United Statcs thc 

ministers to their needs, and in National Red Cross furnishes re- 


By His Honor 
PAUL M. GODDARD 
Mayor 

A PROCLAMATION 


addition carries on its peace time lief in any disaster — floods, hur- 
activities with which we are all ricanes, fires or epidemic^. 

familiar. The Red Cross stands , The I 30 ;™ 0 ’ r ™ alnin ? ln , New ' 
, , 4 . ton aids the veterans in transi- 

by, ever ready to help in time of tion from ml i itary t0 civilian life 


suffering, for it is one of our 
great humanitarian agencies. 


in such service as consultation 
and guidance in personal and 


As in previous years, the month family problems: financial assist- 
of March will be observed as Red ance on the basis of need during 
Cross month throughout the na- the transition period; help in 
tion. Here in New'ton the fund finding proper agency to meet 


raising campaign will be con- 
ducted from March 1st to March 
26th, and we are asked for our 
support and contributions, in 
order that the work of this or- 
ganization may continue to meet 
all the demands made upon it. 


specialized needs: aid in prepar- 
ing and presenting claims far 
government regulations and laws 
affecting veterans and their de- 
pendents and advice and assis- 
tance in educational • opportun- 
ities available under the GI Bf!l 


The amount needed in Newton °f Rights. 


is $90,000, of which $30,000 will 
be retained for the work of the 
j Local Chapter in our own city. 
Newton citizens will surely re- 
spond to this call, as they have 
done so generously in the past, 
and we again respectfully ask for 
your help in this most necessary 
work of the American Red Cross. 

PAUL M.w. 
Paul M. Goddard 
Mayor 

Newton, Mass.. Feb. 14, 1946. 



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Miss Paolini to 
Attend YWCA 
Convention 

o — 

Miss Viola Paolini of 11 Jasset 
St.. Newton, will leave Friday to 
join some 3000 other delegates 
at Atlantic City for the 17th Na- 
tional Convention of the YWCA's 
of the U.S.A., from March 2 to 
March S. Miss Paolini will repre- 
sent the Beta Gamma Club of the 
Boston YWCA at this first Con- 
vention in six years, which will 
deal with the many momentous 
post-war issues now facing the 
434 communities throughout the 
United States in which the 
YWCA operates. 


(Continued on Page 5) 
o 

Nylon Stockings 
To Be Given Away 

A pair of Nylon stockings will 
be the door prize at the Newton 
Centre Woman’s Club on Friday 
evening. March 1. when the Dra- 
matic Club presents the three- 
act comedy "The Torchbearer," at 
eight-thirty. Previews of the play 
indicate that an uproarious eve- 
ning is in store for the audience. 

Mrs. Henry Ide is in charge of 
tickets, Bigelow 2639. 


To Study School Budget 

o— 

A point meeting of the Newton 
School Committee and the Fin- 
ance Committee of the Newton 
Board of Aldermen will be held 
on March S to study tht budget 
request of the School Committee 
for 1946. 

The total budget requested by 
the School Department and ap- 
proved by Mayor Paul M. God- 
dared is $1,665,914. These figures 
show an increase of $93,096 over 
the 1945 budget for which $1.- 
572.S1S was appropriated and $1.- 
561.205 was expended 


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WESTON 







PAGE TWO 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 21, 1946 


The Newton Graphic 

(Consolidated With Which Is The Town Crier) 
“Newton's l.eadinc and D1dr«t Newspaper” 
F!stabli»hrd 1972 
Published Weekly on Thursdays 


Office 11 Centre Avenue Newton - P O Building 
Mail Address: Bos 20ft Newton ft?. Massachusetts 
Telephone I.ASell 4.154 


John W Fielding. Manager 


PHILIP O. AHLIN 
Editor and Advertising Manager 


Entered as second-class mail matter at the post offic# at 
Boston. Mass, under the Act of March 3 1870 


Color 


Newton Centre 
Girl in College 
Players Production 




■A e^vweAvvvvvvvwAiV^ 


The ''Gimmies” Wreck Socialized Medicine 

The government of New Zealand is seriously considering 
whether that country's free physician service will he continued. 

The record of New Zealand's compulsory health insurance 
reveals that the cost nf disability pensions and medical care 
benefits tripled between 1940 and 1945. The rise was due to 
increasing costs of various classes of benefits, as well as to the 
addition of new classes of medical benefits in 1941 and 1942. 
Sonic types of benefit', namely pernianeAt and temporary dis- 
ability and maternity benefits. >how h fairly constant cost level 
over t tie last few years. On the other hand, hospitalization, 
medical care and pharmaceutical, and supplementary medical 
benefits have shown substantial increases almost every year since 
their inception. 

This shows that New Zealand has been unable to keep the 
costs of operation of compulsory health insurance on an even 
keel, due to factors not strictly of a social nature. One of these 
is t tie human tendency to take advantage of benefits offered 
under a compulsory system; another is the political pressure 
for increases in rates and duration of benefits, ns well as for 
increase in'eoverage. Both these factors arc difficult to evaluate 
in terms of statistics, hut they exist. 

New Zealand has had compulsory health insurance since 
1939. and in these years of trial its operation lias become more 
costly with every year that passes. 

This is something for America, now burdened with a Federal 
debt of nearly $300 billion, to think about when it considers 
entering the field of socialized medicine. 


Awning and Screen 
Material Critical 

— o — 

Mr. John M. Walker. President 
of the Home Specialties Company. 
Inc., of Newton Center, having 
just returned from a convention 
in Hartford. Connecticut of the 
New' England Awning & Tent 
Manufacturers’ Association, was 
interviewed by a reporter of this 
paper and advised him that the 
awning situation is critical due 
to the O.P.A. ceiling on cotton 
goods. The manufacturers of cot- 
ton are not allowed to weave 
enough goods for the suppliers 
to paint into awning stripes. He 
advised that if there are any cus- 
tomers interested in recovering 
their present frames or obtain- 
ing new awnings, to place their 
orders immediately while there 


Real Estate 

Alvord Bros., report the follow- 
ing recent activity: Sale of the 
two-family residence at 37 Cryst- 
al and 51 Newbitry street, New- 
ton Centre, for Miss Marguerite 
Flanders. Trustee, to Mrs. Gert- 
rude S. Locke: the modern Co- 
lonial home at 1958 Beacon street, 
Waban, for Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
J. Lukrns to Mr. and Mrs. Mich- 
ael J Hueston: and an older type 
two -family dwelling at 21 Hill- 
side road, Newton Highlands, for 
A. R. Derdcrian. et al, to Mr. and 
Mrs. Mason H. Stone, Jr. 

is a sufficient supply of material 
available. 

The same situation applies in 
the screen business. There is to 
be a limited supply of copper 
wire available for the recovering 
of screen frames and for the sup- 
plying of new window and porch 
screens. 


PARAMOUNT 


I: «» 

s»t Mat. . _ . 

i.vipm. Newton Centre 




I.ASell 41 SO 


4 Dayi — March 3-4-3-ft 

Sunday thru \T ndneidu 
Errol Flynn - Alexia Smith 

“SAN ANTONIO” 

In Technicolor 

Sidney Tolar in 

"RED DRAGON" 


3 Day* — Match 7-8-9 

T fill raday thru Saturday 
Don Ciimeron - ft vonne De Carlo 

“FRONTIER GAL” 

In Technicolor 

Charles Laughton in 

"CAPTAIN KIDD" 


Saturday 1 latinrc 

“THE PHANTOM RIDER” 


WEST NEWTON 

WF.57 VEWTON SQUARE 

LASell 3540 


•loan Leslie • Robert Hutton 

‘Too Young To Know’ 

Morgan Conway-Anne Jeffreys 

“Dick Tracy” 

Wfdne-day-g'hureday-FridA: -Sat urday 
4 Days March 6-7-8-B 

Rosalind Russell 
Lee Bowman 

She Wouldn’t Say Yes 

Nina Foch-George Mac ready 

“My Name 

Is Julia Ross” 


(Tht opinion* exprestca in thi* 
column art tht tenter’* uum. ana 
do nut ritcc Manly reflect tht vtewt 
or policy of (hit neu-epaper. — Edi- 
tor's Note). 

Warning 

Let us not become too excited 
about the various votes passed 
by the lower branch of Congress. 
Remember that what counts is 
the final result. If and when the 
upper branch, the Senate, join3 
with the House in passing one of 
these vital bills, such as the Case 
bill or the bill which drastically 
curbs the arrogant power of 
Czar .Tames Caesar Petrillo. then 
and then only can we breathe a 
sigh of relief. 

Take the Case bill, for exam- 
ple. The House passed it by a tre- 
mendous majority. It is current- 
ly before the Senate, where there 
seems to be every liklihood that 
it will be very much emasculat- 
ed. It may be watered down to 
the same extent as the Presi- 
dent’s full employment bill. The 
same fate may be awaiting the 
Petrillo bill, which passed the 
House by the huge margin of 
223 to 43. In other words, why 
not write or wire our two Unit- 
ed States Senators. Hon. Lever- 
et t Saltonstall and David I. 
Walsh and tell them in on uncer- 
tain terms just what you would 
like to have them do? The Case 
bill may seem somewhat drastic . 
and some argument may be ad- ! 
vanced fcfr toning it down a bit. 
However, it must NOT be 
toned down too much. The ! 
1 same holds true of the Petrillo, 
| bill, tho' there would seem to 
less necessity here for any dra- 
l Stic revision. 

Got. Tobin 

It may seem a tempest in a 
teapot, but for a short time it 
looked as tho’ His Excellency 
had pulled a boner. Later oh it 
developed that the Governor 
had not intended to cut the Lt. 
Governor off from his custom- 
ary priviledge of standing in 
the receiving line at the State 
House at the Washington Birth- 
day reception. Incidentlv, the 
reception this year turned out 
to be more or less of a frost.. 
As the Herald stated, however, 
why should we get exbited 
about going all the way in town 
on a holiday to shake hands 
with our state officials when 
they are not passing out nylons 
or butter! 

Speaking of these two men, it 
will pay to watch developments 
rather closely during the next 
few months. The battle is on 
and both men are already spar- 
ring’ for openings. Several ast- 
ute observers with whom I 
have chatted recently have 
stated that a great deal will 
depend this fall on the national 
situation, especialily as it per- 
tains to the general business 
situation and the trend of in- 


NEWTON 
in The 
Past 


.MI RIEI, EDISON 

Miss Muriel Edison, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Edison 
of Newton Center, has been cast 
in one of the lead roles in the 
forthcoming Marietta College 
Players’ Club production, "The 
Man Who Came To Dinner,” 
which will be presented March 
5-9, at the college’s Little The- 
ater. Miss Edison, a sophomore, 
has been active in dramatic work 
since coming to Marietta last 
year. In the current production 
she has been cast as Maggie, the 
long-suffering secretary of Sheri- 
dan Whiteside. 


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It’* a nice feeling for a mother to know that her 
daughter is working in safe, wholesome and con- 
genial surroundings. 

Here at the Telephone Company, young girls can 
be sure of these pleasant working conditions 
besides good pay, interesting public service and 
opportunities for regular advancement. 

Why not suggest that your daughter talk things 
over with us today. 


An at once, You may telephone to inquire 
about these positions between 8:40 A M and 
1 1 I*. M. without charge, by calling Enter- 
prise loot). 

hmf/itamtni Office 24 S State Street Boston 

KEY. ENG* AND Tfl c PH0NE AND TF.I.E0PAPH COMPANY 




Making Theatrical History! 

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Now In Its 72nd WEEK! 

These Famous Stage 
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Boston Stock Company 

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Broadway's Comedy Hit 

"THE FAMILY 
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BRATTLE HALL 

THEATRE 


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< \MlimiH.r. < nrlwin II TO 


ternational affairs. In other 
words, if President Truman 
succeeds in getting order out of 
the current chaos before next 
fall and if the UNO appears to 
be accomplishing something of 
importance, it will make it easier 
for the Governor to turn back 
the Bradford challenge. In the 
meantime, if the G.O.P. Is 
smart, it will spend a great 
deal of time in currying favor 
with the so-called labor vote 
and with the great middle-class 
vote. There is always a tend- 
ency on the part, of the Rep- 
ublicans to spend too much 
time on the business vote and 
tho vote of the relatively well- 
to-do. Nowadays, this is ex- ' 
tremely foolish, for the simple 
reason that these elements now 
comprise a minority of the 
grand total vote. Think that 
over. 

Board ol Aldermen 

When I was driving home 
late the other night after a pro- 
longued business banquet in 
Boston, I saw lights in City 
Hall and stopped. Sure enough, 
our Board of Alderman were 
still at it hot and heavy at 1:30 
A.M. Seems to me I heard : 
something about a special com- 
mittee having been appointed to 
ascertain if there was not some 
way in which the work of the 
Board could be organized to 
allow the distinguished Aider- 
men a chance to have a bit 
more sleep on the first and 
third Mondays of the month. 

I wonder what became of that 
committee. Our Aldermen are 
not all young and they do need 
more sleep. After all, they are 
giving freely and most gener- 
ously of their time and they 
should not he expected to sacri 
fice their health. 

Weekly Quiz 

The so-called “Solid south” 
consists of the following ten i 
states: Virginia, North Caro- 
lina. South Carolina. Georgia. 
Florida. Alabama, Mississippi, 
Louisiana. Texas and Arkansas. 

This week's question is; What 
gave the Bull Moose Party its 
name in 1912. This you may 
recall, was the party founded 
by the original Roosevelt, <T.R.) 

The Pauley Nomination 

What interests me about the 
nomination of Edwin W. Pauley 
as Undersecretary of the Navy 
is not so much whether or not 
Mr. Pauley can be exonerated 
of the charge, or at the least 
the strong intimation that he 
ever sold oil directly to Japan, 
as it is the stubborn insistence 
of President Truman that Pau- 
ley he voted on by the United 
States Senate. One would think 
that our Chief Executive, hav 


WWVWWSAMAAAVW 

NEWTON IN THE PAST 

55 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb, 27, 1891 

— O — 

Mr. L. W. Cook has taken the 
agency for the Singer Sewing 
Machine for Newton and has 
opened an office at the corner of 
Centre and Jefferson streets. 

— o — 

A mail box has been placed on 
a convenient post at the West 
Newton .depot and is regarded 
as a great convenience. It is 
hoped that is it an intiatory step 
in the direction of free delivery. 

— o - 

The Highland Club are having 
alterations and improvements 
madp in their Club house, and 
will probably have it ready for 
the furnishings about tho first 
of March. A janitor has been se- 
cured and he is novf on duty. 

— o — 

The American cooperative 
union instituted a lodge in Lower 
Falls last evening. 

— o — 

30 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 28. 1896 

On Monday, 1034 books were 
taken out of the Free Library, 
next to the largest number on 
record, 1060, which was reached 
one day last year. 

— o — 

As viewed from Washington 
street, West Newton, the new 
Pierce school building seems to 
be mainly roof, which promises 
to be stil piore aggressive and 
prominent when the thing is com- 
pleted. Possibly the appearance 
may improve, but the casual 
lookeron can not help wondering 
how the young idea can ever be 
taught to rise through such a 
roof as that. 

■ — o — 

The fife and drum corps, known 
as the Garden City Band, organ- 
ized some time ago in this village, 
has recently changed its name to 
the Volunteer Fife and Drum 
Corps. 

— o — 

The public declaration of the 
senior class will take place on 
Thursday, March 12th. Newton 
High will run a team race with 
Cambridge High and Latin at the 
meet of the latter to be held at 
the Cambridgeport Gymnasium 
at 2 p. m. tomorrow. Newton will 
be represented by Cotting. 
Owens, Hollis, Wise and Burdon. 
A number of men have also en- 
tered the open events. N. H. S. 
item. 

— o — 

23 Years Ago 

Newton Graphic, Feb. 25, 1921 

The snowstorm on Sunday was 
the worst of the season and re- 
minded one of the scenes of last 
year. About 16 inches of snow 
fell, and the Street Department 
made its usual good record of 
cleaning the streets. More than 
250 men and 80 horses were en- 
gaged in the work. 

— o — 

Rev. Harry Lutz announced 
last Sunday at Channlng Church, 
Newton, that while deeply grate- 
ful for the action of the society 
at its annual meeting in voting 
not to accept 1 ir. resignation, he 
never-the-less felt that the wisest 
course was to adhere to his ac- 
tion. Mr. Lutz has been in 
Newton nearly 11 years, having 
come here in April, 1910, from 
Billerica, and his connection with 
Channing Church has been longer 
than that of any other minister, 
except the late Rev. Dr. Horn- 
brooke. 


Newton Man General 
Manager S.W.P. 
Corporation 

— o— 

Edward J. Stewart, President 
of the Smaller Business Associa- 
tion of New England, in an an- 
nouncement made today, stated 
that Richard C. Cooke of Newton, 
former New England Regional Di- 
rector for the Smaller War Plants 
Corporation, would become Gen- 
eral Manager of their organiza- 
tion on March 1st. 

Mr. Stewart further stated that 
"our drive for 5.000 new mem- 
bers begins on March 1st. and 
Mr. Cooke will have full super- 
vision over this project. Due to 
his long connection in Govern- 
ment service during the war, and 
his wide acquaintcnceship with 
Small Business throughout New 
England, in addition to his hay- 
ing successfully conducted his 
own business, Mr. Cooke comes 
to us fully qualified to conduct 
the affairs of our Association.” 
In a statement hy Mr. Cooke, he 
said "Small Business generally 
appreciates the necessity for a 
strong organization to protect 
its operations in a peacetime 
period. We do not expect or 
need preferential treatment from 
the Government, but wo will de- 
mand legislation and Government 
regulations that are equitable to 
business, labor and the public. 
The immediate future will de- 
mand forceful action by Small 
Business to clear away the sev- 
eral obstacles that are blocking 
a speedy return to fujl production 
and gainful employment. 

"Small Business does not in- 
tend to sit and wait but will at- 
tack the several forces which are 
blocking and limiting its growth 
and welfare. Specifically, there 
must be first, more equitable and 
speedy distribution of Govern- 
ment surplus materials and com- 
modities. Second, better access 
to critical materials and compon- 
ents needed by the small plants 
of New England. Small Business 
which in the aggregate employs 
the major portion of New Eng- 
land workers, must be accorded 
equitable treatment if the return- 
ihg veteran and displaced war 
worker arc to have their right- 
ful opportunities.” 

Mr. Stewart also announced 
that their new offices were lo- 
cated at 120 Boylston Street. 
Boston. Mass., with a staff of 
trained personnel. 


Flower Show's 
Diamond Jubilee 
March 18-23 

— o — 

Two old-fashioned gardens will . 
feature the 75th annual Spring 
Flower Show at Mechanics Build- 
ing. Boston, March 18-23. 

"Since it Is our diamond Jubi- 
lee,” stated Arno H. Nehrling, 
show director, “we have created 
two gardens of the year 1870— 
when these Spring Flower Shows 
first began. 

"One such garden, staged by 
Sherman Eddy of Avon, Connec- 
ticut, is a grandmother’s garden 
of nostalgic beauty and rare New 
England charm. An old weathered 
farmhouse will be bowered in 
white lilacs and partly hidden by 
thickets of spiraea. The garden 
fence will be all but hidden hy 
flowering almond trees while the 
woodshed will be shaded by a 
grapevine. Hosts of yellow daffo- 
dils will border the well and the 
rain barrel. 

"Another garden of 1870, staged 
,.hy Frost and Higgins of Arling- 
' ton, will he of the suburban type. 
Cast iron fixtures s<\ typicai of 
the period will include urns and 
a fountain. Trees will include 
magnolias, weeping willows and 
lilacs while the typical carpet 
bedding of the period will be car- 
ried out by borders along the 
lawn. 

"A different kind of garden will 
be up to the minute — a living 


Paramount Theatri 
Performance! Now 
At 1:45 and 7:45 

When the management of the 
Paramount Theatre, Newton, can 
make It more pleasant for Its 
patrons, it does It. Many 
requests have been made that 
afternoon performances begin at. 
1:15 and evenings at 7:45. This 
policy of change in hours was 
adopted as of Monday, February 
25th. 

As announced In the Graphic 
recently, the Paramount’s fam- 
ily night policy was changed to 
Thursdays, (Mondays remaining 
the same by popular request). 

Hereafter the feature attract* 
tion will be shown first, and 
Monday and Thursday evenings 
at 8 p.m. 

Thus, Paramount’s new hours 
are as follows: 

Afternoons — 1:45. 

Evenings — 7:45. 

Saturday matinee — 1:30. 

Sundays and holidays, contin- 
uous performances. 


memorial to members of the 
armed forces. This garden, by 
the Bay State Nurseries, North 
Abington, will be both a gorge- 
ous display of evergreens and 
flowering shrubs and trees and 
an example of adequate and ap ; 
propriate design for Its purpose. 

"And, of course," Mr. Nehr- 
; ling concluded, "there will be 
many other gardens and displays, 
from the California hillside 1 
bright with acacias down to halls 
‘ each filled with roses and carna- 
tions.” 


■ 

ijnf-i 


Newton Red Cross 
Production Gets Big Quota 
01 Relief Garments 

Mrs. Charles E. Spencer, Jr., 
Chairman of Production for New- 
ton Red Cross, has just announc- 
ed the acceptance of an emer- 
gency quota of 1000 children’s 
garments. 

"During the war years," says 
Mrs. Spencer, "Our workroom 
volunteers did a job of which 
they can be proud. They perform- 
ed a gruelling, monotonous task 
which entailed for many a real 
sacrifice of time and energy. 
Since V-E Day, there has been 
understandably enough, a mark- 
ed slackening of effort, but I 
feel sure we can count on them 
to help us meet this real need." 

Mrs. Spencer went on to say 
that the question has been asked, 
"Is there a real need?" There is. 
The need is probably greater to- 
day than at any time since the 
war began. Millions of civilians 
have lost all of their possessions. 
They are now struggling to main- 
tain a hare existence in the rub- 
ble of former cities, in unheated, 
damp caves, in crude shacks. 

As soon as material arrives the 
workrooms will be notified and 
more available information will 
be given out at a later date. 


PLAN 

BLFOHL YOU 

PLANT 

PLAN YOUR GARDEN ON PAPER FIRST. Consult 
your seedsman for suggestions as to better planting, 
fertilizing and general care. Also ask him about new 
or more choice varieties of seeds. Eliminate those 
grown not well liked by the family but fill in that 
space with another choice. Increase your variety of 
foods to be selected from 

OUR SEEDSMAN, Mr. Normon Howden, has been in 
this business for 48 years. His record is a proven 
one. You can depend on his advice. 


the CLAPPER co. 

FORMERLY NEW ENGLAND TORO CO. 

NEWTON SEED-GARDEN STORE 

1121 Washington SI., West Newton 65 - BIG. 7900 


difficult to figure out what the 
President has to gain by stick- 
ing to his guns and forcing the 
Senate to take action one way 
or another. Should his unfor- 
tunate nominee he turned down, 
it would be a blow to the ad- 
ministration. Even should he 
eventually win, there would 1** 
a bad taste in the public's 
mouth. The Proesident will 



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I 









PAGE THREE 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1946 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 





Newton Tames 
No. Quincy 31-26 

— o — 

Prepping for the Eastern Tech 
Tourney to be held at Boston 
Garden from March 5th-March 
9th, the Newton High School 
basketball five defeated North 
Quincy, 31-26 at the Newton Gym 
last Wednesday afternoon. It was 
a post-season game; the Tigers 
finishing its regular season with 
a 14-1 win record to cop the Su- 
burban League Hoop title for the 
•third straight year and win its 
third successive invitation to the 
Tourney as a Class A entry. 

North Quincy, by the way, was 
the team which beat the Newton- 
ites in the first round of the Tech 
games last year. The season be- 
fore that, 1944, the Orange and 
Back upset New Bedford Voca- 
tional in a thrilling overtime in 
the opening match only to lose 
out to Brockton in the semi- 
finals. 

Coach Warren Huston intends 
to start the same winning five 
combination which swept thru 
the Suburban league and other 
opposition this year — save a 
startling upset by Waltham late 
in the season. Bob Scanlon and 
George Patterson will hold down 
the forward spots, lanky and 
elusive Rod Jennings will tower 
in the bucket, and husky Art 
Weinstock will share the guard- 
ing duties with Gordy Carlisle. 

In the exhibition with North 
Quincy, the Tigers after a poor 
and dull first half came to life in 
the third and fourth periods to 
break a 13-13 deadlock at half 
time. Two baskets apiece by 
scrappy Scanlon and Streatch 
Jennings, and one each by Wein- 
stock and Patterson put the Hus- 
ton five ahead 25-13 at the close 
of the third stanza. They were 
never headed after that: as Jen- 
nings and Carlisle sank free 
tosses, Jenny plunked in another 
basket, and Weinstock bucketed 
a beauty of a rush dribble 
underhand hot shot. With two 
minutes remaining the Tigers 
played caustiouslv and neither 
side scored. 

HOP SHOTS: 

Coach Huston making sure 
that his offense and defensive 
operations will be in working 
order by Tech Tourney game 
time, played’one substitution and 
that was Brimbleeon. . . . The 
Tigers played in regular season 
form although it didn't seem so. 
Quincy was just surprisingly in- 
different to Newton’s high rating 
and prowess. . . . Weinstock re- 
minds this writer of Harold Peek, 
the star guard of the 1944 Tour- 
ney team. He’s tough, rugged 
and bully. That was some roar 
that went up when he bowled 
over five students behind the 
backboard trying to recover a 
loose ball . . Bob Scanlon is really 
a fast stepper, and a tricky oper- 
ator. ... 15 year old and 6 foot- 
five, Jennings will be the man to 
watch at thp Tourney. If he's hot, 
Newton will be hot, but if Jen 
nings is stopped, the Orange had 
better be perfection in its other 
departments. Under the tutelage 
of Coach Huston this lad should 
become another Tony Lavclli of 
Yale, formerly the ace center at 
Somerville High. . . . Hacker Mar- 
tin the captain and teammate of 
Peck's in the 1944 Newton team 
on the sidelines remarking "a 
grand club and they ought to go 
far in the Tourney.'' This "46'’ 
club is fast, has sharp shooters, 
and stands as a scrappy outfit. 


Army Answers 


Q. I was a World War I 
widow and remarried. Now 
I’m a widow again. Am I en- 
titled to widow's pension again? 
G. M., Montpelier. 

A. No. if you refer to rein- 
statement of a pension based on 
your first husband’s military 
service. 

Q. Is a soldier with two de- 
pendent children eligible for a 
discharge? M.Z., Salem. 

A. No. There must be three 
minor children. 

Q- Does a veteran still write 
to the Chicago address about 
non • receipt of war bonds 
bought while In the Army? 
S.T., Concord. 

A. No. He should write to the 
new address — Army War Bond 
Office. Cemral Field Fiscal Office, 
Building 204. 4300 Goodfellow 
Boulevard, St. Louis 20. Mis- 
souri. 

Q. What Is the amount of 
the Federal Bonus for World 
War n? A.M.. Boston. 

A. There is no World War II 
Federal Bonus at this time. Cer- ’ 
rain proposals are under way in 
Washington. 

Q. Now that commercial 
steamship travel is opening up 
where can a veteran get in- 
formation about travel in the 
British Isles? R.P., Augusta. 

A. Write to The Travel As- 
sociation of Great Britain and 
Ireland. 6 Arlington Street. St. 
James, London. S.W.F.. England. 
Q. Is an officer entitled to 
hospitalization for a service 
connected disability while on 
terminal leave? T.B.. Hartford. 

A. Yes. He should report to 
the nearest Army hospital. 

Q. Where can I. a veteran 
of Worlti War II. write about 
my soldier deposits? A. C.. 
Covington. 

A. Write to Office of Special 
Settlement Accounts. U. S. Army. 
27 Pine Street. New York City. 
New York. 

Q. Where is the Army Re- 
gional Hospital for New Eng- 
land? T. S., Bangor. 

A. The Regional Army Hos 
pital in the First Service Com- 
mand is located at Waltham. 
Mass. 


Newton Residents 
To Attend 
Conference 

Mrs. F. Reed Estabrook. Jr., 
of Chestnut Hill, Mrs. J. B. 
Jamieson of Newton Centre, and 
Mrs. L. Sumner Pruvne of New- 
ton are among those planning to 
attend a conference on "Popula- 
tion Problems In a Free World’ 1 
on Monday evening. March 4th, 
at the Harvard Faculty Club in 
Cambridge. 

The conference, which is spon- 
sored jointly by the National 
Council of Jewish Women, the 
Planned Parenthood League of 
Massachusetts, and the Public 
Health Division of the Massa- 
chusetts State Federation of 
Women's Clubs, is under the 
chairmanship of Karl Sax. Pro- 
fessor of Botany at Harvard. 

Speakers will be Professor 
John D. Black, Agricultural 
Economist. Harvard University; 
Dr. Robert C. Cook. Editor of 
the Journal of Heredity: and 
Professor Frank H, Hankins. So- 
ciologist. of Smith College. 

Professor Sax. in commenting 
on plans for the conference, stat- 
ed that "the population problems 
of the world are complex, con- 
troversial. often paradoxical. Yet 
they must be solved if there is to 
be any hope of establishing the 
Four Freedoms everywhere in 
the world.’’ 

The conference Is open to the 
public. 


No man ever likes to admit 
that he has been wrong — women 
escape this embarrassment bv 
never being wrong. 

This notice was posted in the 
Lingerie Department of a Den- 
ver store; "During the fiu epi- 
demic. we will not change under- 
wear.’’ 


They’re about the best in New 
England when they all play 
heads-up ball and click all at 
once. We hope they show the best 
in the Tourney . . Newspaper men 
at the game commented on the 
lack of long shooting by Newton. 
More shots at the basket mean 
more points but then maybe Hus- 
ton ordered them to save these 
shots for the big games next 
week. The first half was close 
since Newton didn’t figure on 
North Quincy's dogged offense 
nor stubborn defense. The first 
basket wasn't made until 4 min- 
utes terminated. . . . Sid Cedrone, 
the Quincy play maker, should 
make the South Shore All Star 
Team . . he’s a cool and collected 
ball- handler and a crack shot 
player. 


Newton Girl Active in 
Red Cross Work in Guam 

— O — 

Evelyn G. Grey. American Red 
Cross worker from Newton. 
Mass., is one of nine Red Cross 
girls who are learning history 
the easy way from 6000 veterans 
of the Third Marine Division 
"sweating it out’’ in Guam. 

"Just listening we have learn- 
ed first-hand why Iwo Jima was 
important to our Pacific cam- 
paign. " Miss Grey explains. "Es- 
sential as an air base to shorten 
the bombing runs to Japan, it 
had to be taken, although from 
the modest personal accounts 
you would never realize the 
bravery incurred by Marines 
here. Instead they credit every- 
thing to he 20,000 men who 
died. ' 

Miss Grey, with eight other 
Red Cross girls, daily starts out 
for the Marine Corps Red Cross 
Club which operates from 3 p.m. 
to 10 p.m. At the conclusion of 
their day's activities, the Red 
Cross girls usually return to 
headquarters through the green 
battle-scarred hills to enjoy a 
foot soaking session. "Those 
heavy boots necessary to slog 
through the volcanic sands here 
can be awfully wearing for danc- 
ing." Miss Grey comments. 

Miss Grey is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Greenspan 
of 175 Waverly street, Newton. 
She is a graduate of the Lelaiui 
Powers school of the Theater and 
was employed as an assistant 
buyer for the Jordan Marsh Co. 
before joining the American Red 
Cross September. 1944. Miss 
Grey also played summer stock 
with the Boothpy Co., in Massa- 
chusetts. 


Confucius did not say; "Boy 
who drive car must keep mind 
on brake , . . not clutch." 


1910 FUND CAMPAIGN — $99,000 . 


21 FOVrEII STIIIIl-MMIOV Villi - MEtnlur I'll 

Prepared by ibt Adcerlising Council in Cooperation uilb the American Red Cron 


Prison Association 
Supervisor to Speak 
At N. Centre Church 

Miss Mary Elizabeth Cole, Su- 
pervisor of the Women’s Division 
of the United Prison Association 
of Massachusetts, will address 
the Women’s Benevolent Society 
of First Congregational Church, 
Newton Centre, at a luncheon 
meeting Tuesday, March 5. The 
meeting was arranged by the 
Social Relations Committee. 

Miss Cole, who has had wide 
experience in social work, re- 
cently returned to the United 
States from Newfoundland 
where for three years she was 
Director of the U. S. O. Club at 
St. John’s. Before the war she 
was for seven years Director of 
Women’s Activities at Franklin 
Settlement, Detroit, Michigan. A 
graduate of Cornell College at 
Mt. Vernon, Iowa, Miss Cole also 
served as a rural county social 
worker in southern Iowa. 

The United Prison Association 
Is an Incorporated social agency 
affiliated with the Boston Coun- 
cil of Social Agencies. It is en- 
gaged In combating crime by 
aiding In the rehabilitation of 
men and women discharged from 
State, county, and federal pris- 
ons and jails. The Association 
also sponsors and supports pro- 
gressive penal legislation and 
conducts a program of public 
education on penal and crime 
problems. 

o 

Arthur C. Whitney. C.S., 

To Lecture at First 
Chnrch, Newtonille 

— o— 

Arthur C. Whitney, C.S., of 
Chicago, Illinois, will give a lec- 
ture on Christian Science in 
First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Newton, Friday, March 15, at 8 
p. m. His subject will be, "Chris- 


T wenty-nine years agt>, in 1917, your Red 
Gross was given the proud title, “The 
Greatest Mother In The World.” Today after 
the greatest struggle in history, that title has 
been retained. The list of services your Red 
Cross has given our Servicemen — your Ser- 
viceman — is almost endless. 

Blood plasma made the difference between 
life and death to many thousands of our men. 

Food parcels packed by the Red Gross 
meant survival to many of our men in prisoner 
of war camps. Medical kits and capture par- 
cels were provided wherever possible. Red 
Gross workers distributed release kits to 
thousands of prisoners as soon after their 
liberation as possible. Red Gross Glubs have 
sprung up by the hundreds all over the world 
, . . wherever the Armed Forces went . . . sup- 
plying a warm touch of home for lonely, home- 
sick lads. 


Red Cross hospital workers talk to the men 
— laugh and play games with them — provide 
amusement and recreation facilities to shorten 
long, dreary days. The cheerful smile of an 
American girl helps banish loneliness and 
boredom . . . helps a man keep his chin up when 
things look pretty dark. 

And on the home front, wherever fire, flood 
or other disaster strikes, the Red Cross is 
ready with relief for the suffering. 

Yes, your Red Cross is literally mother to 
many millions . . . friend of the friendless . . . 
comrade in time of need. And its work must 
go on. Hundreds of thousands of our men are 
still overseas. They need the Red Cross, and 
they need it now. 

It is your Red Cross. The gift you give is 
its only income. Without you, the Red Crops 
can not carry on. Don’t put off giving to the 
Red Cross. Give today! 


YOUR Red Cross MUST CARRY ON . . 


RED CROSS 




Still 


fredt 65 ' 


thw 


S.P.C.A. Photographic 
Conteit Announced 

— O — 

Eric H. Hansen, President of 
the Massachusetts Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to Ani- 
mals, 180 Longwood avenue, Bos- 
ton, yesterday announced its an- 
nual, nationwide photographic 
contest which will close June 
30th. Cash prizes amounting to 
$95.00 and ten additional prizes 
of subscriptions to Our Dumb An- 
imals, official monthly publica- 
tion of the Society, are offered 
for clear, outstanding photo- 
graphs of wild or domestic ani- 
mals and birds. 

All contestants are urged to 
submit pictures that tell a story 
— for Instance, pictures of wild 
life feeding or building homes, or 
of domestic animals in surround- 
ings showing care and thought- 
fulness for their comfort. The 
Contest is open to professionals 
and amateurs alike, but entries 
will be accepted only from those 
who have actually taken the 
photographs. 

Information concerning the 
rules of the competition may be 
obtained by writing to the Con- 
test Editor, Our Dumb Animals, 
180 Longwood Avenue, Boston 15, 
Massachusetts. 


Genevieve Tocci 
loins Staff of 
Dancing School 


We do not mind zero tempera- 
tures much ... as long as they 
are confined to some other geo- 
graphic location. 


tian Science: A Religion of 
Answered Prayer." 

Mr. Whitnew is a member of 
the Board of Lectureship of The 
Mother Church, The First Church 
of Christ, Scientist in Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

The church edifice is located at 
381 Walnut street, Newtonville 
and the public is cordially invited 
to attend. 


GENEVIEVE TOCCI, profes- 
sional dancer and teacher of 
Waban recently added to 
the staff of Kiralfy's School 
for the Dance in West New- 
ton. 

Kiralfy’s, School for the Dance, 
recently opened at the Neighbor- 
hood Club, West Newton, an- 
nounces through its Director, 
Nona K. Leonard, that the school 
staff had been augmented by 
the addition of Miss Genevieve 
Tocci. Miss Tocci, a native of 
Waban, has had extensive train- 
ing and experience in the dance 
since she was a child of three, 
j emminently qualifying her to as- 
j sist in bringing the Kiralfy tra- 
| dition of the dance to the par- 
ents of Newton's children. 

Starting as a child dancer of 
three, Miss Tocci performed in 
many of the Boston theatres and 
shortly joined a weekly radio 
program over a local station. At 
twelve, she toured the RKO 


Squanto District of 
Norumbega Council 
Holds Join} Meeting 

— o— 

Joint meeting of Cub Scout 
Pack 6 and 22 was hold Thursday 
night February 21, at the New- 
tonville Women’s Club, to view 
the film entitled "Cub Scouting." 

Cub Chairman for Cub Scouts 
in Squanto District, Robert G. 
Toher, was in charge of the meet- 
ing which was attended by Cub 
Scouts and their parents of 
Squanto District. 

These films are being used as a 
basis for instruction on how to 
conduct a Cub Scout Circus 
which is the theme for the 
month of April for the Cub 
Scouts of Norumbega Council. 


Keith circuit a3 a member of the 
Dolanettes. With the outbreak 
of the war, Miss Tocci joined the 
USO with her brother as a dance 
team and they entertained the 
members of the armed forces 
until her brother himself entered 
the service, leaving his sister to 
carry on alone. 

As a member of the Stage 
Door Canteen and the American 
Theatre Wing, Miss Tocci contin- 
ued to dance for the servicemen 
until the cessation of hostilities. 
A graduate of Newton High 
School and trained at the Bishop 
Lee Dramatic School, Miss Tocci 
has just returned from New 
York where she completed the 
Teacher Training Course of the 
Dance Educators of America. 
With this training in ballet, mu- 
sical comedy and tap dancing, 
she and Nona Leonard offer a 
wefl founded program in teach- 
ing children the rudiments of 
the dance. Classes are held each 
Saturday morning with separate 
classes for various age groups. 


T Swimmers 2nd in 
Championship Meet 

— o — 

In the annual Mass.-R. I. 
Y.M.C.A. Championship Swim- 
ming Meet held last. Saturday 
afternoon at. the Charlestown 
Army-Navy "Y" the Newton "Y" 
Midgets < boys 13 years of age 
and under) placed 2nd in a field 
of 8 teams entered. The Newton 
•swimmers were nosed out. by 
Charlestown, with 16 and 17 
point totals respectively. Last 
year the Newton swimmers won 
the rhanipionship. 

For Newton. William Gray won 
1st place in the 20 yard breast 
stroke, and the local Medley Re- 
lay team, comprised of Richard 
Whelan, William Gray and An- 
thony Amendola. won 1st place 
in that event. Richard Whelan 
took 2nd place in the 20 yard 
back stroke. 

The Midget team will close it’s 
season with a dual meet against 
Melrose "Y” next Saturday after- 
noon at the Newton “Y” pool. The 
meet is scheduled to start at 3 
o’clock, and is open to the public. 

The "Y" Junior swimming team 
is now in training for the Junior 
Two-state Championships, which 
are scheduled for the Boston 
"Y” pool ion Saturday. March 9th. 


Nurses Association 
Meets March 13 

— o — 

Members of District Number 
Five of the Massachusetts State 
Nurses Association will meet on 
March 13, 1946. in the Audito- 
rium of the Both Israel Hospital. 
Boston. The Private Duty Nurses 
Section will hold their business j 
meeting from 7 to 8 p.m. Dis- 
trict Number Five meeting will 
follow from 8 to 9 p.m. At 9 p.m. 
Dr. Jacob Fine will address the 
entire group on "Recent Advanc- 
es in Surgery." 


DRASTIC REDUCTIONS ON ALL BABY CARRIAGES THIS WEEK I 

"fialnfland tore A Club" 
Pthe utimerA 

U Vf rwe r. . ... 


Horn* nf Fin* 

Ilnhy Furniture, 
Carriages and Toys. 

MASTER olive WILSON 


R'Rteey 


.. ru„. •' 

Clive and Patsy are the First Prize Winners of 1 BABYLAND STOPJS Sister and Brother* Club” of NewtoovUie lire 
Evelyn Ostrow. who Is treasurer and aupervisor of THE BABYLAND STOP.ES,, will be «iad to have you come to the ator- 
so she can tell you more about the ciub. The February Prize Winner will oe announced soor. in -he v«w»or. G*»nhv' 
We are specialty shops of flr.e nursery f.miture and tors, and carry a full line of Cr:b«. Wardrobe*.' Ch»s' of Drawe-s 
Youth Beds, and a full assortment of Mattresses, all nationally advertised Baby Carriages. High Cha'-« ’ p'sy Yards 
and Pads. We guarantee everything we sell you. as our busines Is built on recommendation trade a-*" x» service .1 
carriages. Bassinettes tn wicker or enamelled wood, in pink, white or blue. * 

Be ready for Spring. Full selection of all types of strollers, si! metal and wicker. leather and chromium We a-» *ak 
ing order, for them now. Hobby Horses. Tricycles. Scooters. Metal Car:.. Do'.. Carriage •- t %ze . " 

tlonal Toys. Nursery Chairs ar.d Toldy Seats Baby Swings and Sand Boxes SAVES HOLT’S OF SKO B P''.T, »«,"*.> i\4‘ rvm 
THE8E ITEMS ARE VERY SCARCE TODAY. A VISIT WILL CONVINCE YOU. ^ 

WE WOULD BE VERY GLAD TO HAVE VOL COME IN AND LOOK AROUND 
“// IPs Hard to Get — Call BIGeloic 1692 99 

BABYLAND STOBES Inc. 

NEWTONVILLE 



PAGE FOUR 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28, 1948 


Highland Glee Club Spring 
Concert AtH. S., March 19 

Will Present Alan Booth, Former 
Newton Youth, As Guest Artist 

The Spring Concert of the Highland Glee Club will be held 
At the High .School \uditorium on Tuesday. March 19. present- 
ing as soloist Alan Booth, who graduates from Oberlin College 
this spring, where he has majored in music. The Glee Club has 
shown an individual pride in presenting Booth to their audience 
and there is bound to be a splendid turnout to hear this talented 
lad who has grown up in the Newtons. 

Their increasing list of Spon-*-- 

soring Members will be interest- for themselves in the city, which 
ed to know that the club is glv- has been due in no small measure 
ing concerts, in addition to their 1 to the efforts of the men within 
regular spring concert, in Brock- 1 the organization. Mr. Walter H. 
ton. Boston and Lexington. In Sears, chairman of the Sponsor- 
fact. they are quite pleased that ing Membership Committee, has 
the appearance in Lexington is rendered yoeman’s service the 
the second given in that town past three years toward accom- 
this spring. plishing this coveted objective. 

The club is endeavoring to Rehearsals go on with much 
bring before the citizens of New- fervor and no little excitement 
ton as modestly as possible that, not only in presenting Alan 
as a singing organization, they Booth hut likewise a unique and 
have continued through the years tuneful program. 

due. in a large measure, to the o 

faithful following of compara- 1 
tively few supporters. There are 
too many instances where male j 
choruses not only have the en- 1 
thusiatic following of the com- 
munities with which they are 
identified but are considered a 


Hunnewell Club 

— o— 

On Saturday night, March 9th, 
The Hunnewell Club is having a 
Mask and Costume Prom. In ad- 
dition to dancing, they are plan- 


definite part of the community, ning to have some of the old-time 
which could not always be ap- features such as prize waltzes 
plied to your Highland Glee and two-steps, novelty dances, 
Club. etc., including a grand march. 

It really begins to look, how- Music will be furnished by Ken 
ever, that they had at last sue- Reeves’ Orchestra, and a buffet 
ceeded in establishing a place will be served at midnight. 


Newton Community 

Club 

— 0 — 

Don’t Buy Your Easter Bonnet 
Until you see the Newton Com- 
munity Club’s Hat & Accessory ; 
Show at the Hunnewell Club, 
April 3. at 1:30, following which, 
Club members and guests will 
play bridge and other games, 
such as Chinese checkers or gin 
rummy, for table prizes. Mrs. 
Herbert Dwight and Mrs. Alban 
Rosene head the committee for 
dessert. 

A Hat, Bag & Accessory Show 
will be presented by Young’s Mil- 
linery Shop, 188 Harvard avenue, 
Alston, under the direction of 
Mrs. Ronald Jones. Thirty now 
and attractive Spring styles will 
be modeled by Club members. 

The hooked rug class will ex- 
hibit its work also. 

Club members are especially 
urged to bring friends from other 
clubs and bridge groups to this 
party. 

The directors and officers of the 
Club are meeting Friday morning 
March 1, at 10:30, at the home of 
Mrs. David Black, the president, 
to . formulate further plans for 
this affair. 

Social Science Club 

— o — 

Due to the postponement of 
the regular meeting of the So- 
cial Science Club on February 
27, an extra meeting will be held 
at 10:45, March 6, at the Hunne- 
well Club, when Mrs. Samuel Cut- 
ler will read her paper on the 
“Mexican Cession." 


Newton Club Activities 


The Early American House 


Newtonville 
Woman's Club 

— o — 

On Tuesday, March 5th. at. 2:30 
p.m., the Newtonville Woman’s 
Club will hold their annual ob- 
servance of Rank Day. present- 
ed through the courtesy of the 
Newton-Waltham Bank & Trust 
Company. This feature of the 
Club was originated by Mrs. Irv- 
ing O. Palmer, of Newtonville, a 
former president of the club and 
a member of the Women’s Ad- 
visory Committee of the Bank. 
Officials of the Bank will be 
among the special guests of the 
afternoon. Mrs. Palmer will in- 
troduce the distinguished speak- 
er, Dr. Thomas P. Brockway 
author and lecturer, who will 
speak on “Prospects for Peace.” 
Dr. Brockway has held profes- 
sorships at Dartmouth and Yale 
Universities and is the author of 
"Battles Without Bullets." and 
"A Peace that Pays.” Musical 
selections will be given by 
Madam Nina Spaulding, violinist, 
accompanied by Mrs. Rachel L. 
Gilmour. 

Bank Day at the Club is an 
open meeting and all friends of 
the Club and the Bank are cor- 
dially invited to come and enioy 
the afternoon program. Mrs. 
Ralph G. Swain. Fourth Vice- 
President of the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Women’s 
Club will be a platform guest. 

The exhibition of paintings 
done in the Aleutian Islands by 


Lieut. Warren Beach, which were 
lo have been on view in Decem- 
ber, but which were delayed by 
the blizzard, will he displayed in 
the Social Hall. Several large 
oils of the Islands and Alaska, 
and many smaller water colors, 
are in the exhibition. Lieut. Beach 
is a graduate of the Yale School 
of Art and spent several years 
in and about Alaska. 

Pourcrs at the tea will lie, Mrs. 
A. Perry Martin. Mrs. Alfred N. 
Miner, and Mrs. Perez B. How- 
ard. 

o 

Auburndale 
Review Club 

— o — 

“Our Nation’s Libraries” is the 
subject of t,he first paper, to be 
presented by Mrs. Walter R. 
Amesbury, at the meeting of the 
Review Club of Auburndale, at 
10 a. m., on March 5. Other fea- 
tures of the program are as fol- 
lows: "Edgar Hoover and the 

F. B.I.," a paper by Mrs. James 

G. Patterson: "The Iron Horse In 
America,” by Mrs. C. H. Bierman. 
The hostess for the day is Mrs. 
E. J. Wilson of 41 Aspern avenue. 

A new member of the club who 
has just been elected is Mrs. E. 
W. Kingsbury of 526 Auburn 
street. The membership is limi- 
ted to forty women residing in 
Auburndale, each of whom, with 
the exception of the president 
and secretary is expected to 
prepare a paper once a year. 


W. Newton Women's 
Educational Club 

— o — 

The regular meeting to be held 
on Friday, March 8, in the Sec- 
ond Church Parish House. Des- 
sert at 1:00 p.m., will be followed 
by a reception for n$w members. 
At 2:00 p.m. Mrs. Frank Ogilvie, 
president, will conduct the busi- 
ness meeting after which Mrs. 
Charles Gibson, Program Chair- 
man, will present. Ranzy, who 
will speak on “What the Stars 
Hold ‘for You.” Each sign of the 
Zodiac is completely covered, 
everyone’s birthday is analyzed 
in a fascinating artd humorous 
manner. Miss Estelle Marsh, 
Corresonding Secretary of the 
Masachusetts State Federation 
of Women’s Clubs will be the 
special guest. Mrs. Malcolm War- 
ren is Hospitality Hostess. 

The American Home Class will 
meet on Wednesday. March 6 at 
12:30 p.m., at the home of Mrs. 
C. David Gordon, 35 Lindbcrg 
avenue. Mrs. S. R. Williamson is 
luncheon chairman. Miss West 
of the Middlesex Extension Ser- 
vice will speak and the movie 
"Spinach" will be shown. 



PICTURE AND TEXT FROM ROOK OF HOMES 
Published by The Co-operative Banks of Massachusetts 



i l 4 — , 




> 

r-j~L ••j- ) J 



What your RED 


CROSS Chapter does in 

NEWTON 


Junior Mothers 
Rest Club 

— o — 

The Junior Mothers Rest Club 
of Newton Centre will meet on 
Wednesday, March 6, at the home 
of Mrs. Robert F. Cordingley, 38 
Lake avenue. Before the busi- 
ness meeting luncheon will be 
served at 1:15 by Mrs. John W. 
Merrill and Mrs. Robert F. Mil- 
ler assisted by Mrs. Willis B. 
Clough. Mrs. Albert N. Thomp- 
son and Mrs. Cordingley. 


Y OU know what the Red Cross 
has done overseas in World War 
II. The World knows it. Another 
glorious page in the history of your 
Red Cross is being written. 

Each of the 3,754 chapters in the 
nationwide Red Cross network . . . 
just as our local chapter . . . did its 
full share to make possible all the 
help and comfort given our fighting 
men. But that is only half the story. 
Here is what vour Red Cross chapter 
is doing now and will be doing for 
years to come. 




Home Nursing. The Red 

Cross teaches the funda- 
mentals of home nursing to 
many citizens. They learn 
how to care for simple ill- 
nesses. under the doctor'* 
direction. 


Junior Rod Cross. Boys 
and girls learn first aid, 
accident prevention, water 
safety, nutrition, and 
home nursing in order 
to become citizens of 
tomorrow-. 


Volunteer Special Services. Your 

neighbor next door or just around the 
corner is probably a member of one of the 
many Red Cross Volunteer Corps. She may 
sew or knit for our hospitalized men; she 
may drive for the Motor Corps; she may be a 
Nurse’s Aide or a Gray Lady. Perhaps she’s 
a Staff Assistant, or a Home Service worker 
. . . but whatever corps she serves . . . what- 
ever she docs . . her time and effort help 
stretch the Red Cross dollar. 


Disaster Relief. In the United Stares 
last year, the Red Cross gave relief in 
260 disasters. Experience has shown 
that no community is immune. Our 
local chapter has a disaster committee 
set up and ready to act at the initial 
warning of catastrophe ... to provide 
emergency shelter, food, clothing, and 
medical care for the helpless victims . . . 
to save lives and relieve suffering. And 
after the first shock has worn away, 
comes the long job of rehabilitation. 


Home Service. The Red Cross Home 
Service worker is a home town trouble- 
shooter for the serviceman and his 
family. Our Red Cross chapter has 
Home Service workers available for 
duty day or night . . . trained, practical 
people, equipped to act in emergencies. 
The Red Cross two-way communica- 
tion system reaches around the world, 
so that in a sense the serviceman is no 
further from his loved ones than our 
Red Cross chajster. 


First Aid. A crash on the highway . . . 
a slashed wrist... severe shock without 
proper attention, all can produce seri- 
ous results. Our chapter in cooperation 
with individuals and organizations 
maintains mobile first aid units and 
highway first aid stations manned by 
trained first aiders, who help care for 
the victims of traffic accidents until the 
doctor arrives. First aid, water safety, 
and accident prevention classes are 
conducted throughout the country. 


T HINK of the man) thousands who look to our Red Cross for aid and comfort 
in lonely hours of desperate need. Think what its many services and safe- 
guards can mean to our town ... to you, and your loved ones. Then remember 
that vour voluntary services, backed up by your contributions, make it possible 
for Red Cross to carry on in our community. Your individual gifts are its only 
source of income. Without you and your neighbors, there would be no Red 
Cross. Give to the Red Cross today. 


Home Crafters Club 

— o — 

The next meeting of the New- 
ton Homecrafters Club will be 
hold Monday evening, March 4, 
at 7:30 p. m., at the shop of 
Russell V. Mead, 56 Halcyon 
road, Newton Centre. 


The architecture of the early 
Seventeenth Century Colonial 
Hou?e is mainly distinctive for its 
simplicity. It was based mostly on 
economic necessity and therefore 
ihc rooms were small and iow- 
studded. Construction was simple 
and the principal framing was of 
the most easily obtainable wood 
which would stand the test of 
time. These houses were generally 
devoid of modeling or ornament, 
hut their fine outlines and good 
composition arrest the eye today. 


The house shown is of this early 
type, with a 2-story front and a 
1 -story lean-to at the rear. It has 
an exceptionally good plan. This 
general type lends itself to the 
utmost economy. 

It has a good living-room, dining- 
room. kitchen and study on the 
first floor. The study is located 
next to the lavatory and can be 
used quite well as an extra bed- 
room. Upstairs there are three 
excellent bedrooms and a hath. 


Newton Kiwanis Club 


YOUR 


Red Cross 



MUST CARRY ON 


This Spare is Contributed by tlio follouin g Hanking Institution a 

NEWTON NATIONAL BANK NEWTON SAVINGS BANK WEST NEWTON SAVINGS BANK 

NEWTON CORNER und NEWTON CENTRE NEWTON CORNER WEST NEWTON 

NEWTON CENTRE SAVINGS BANK NEWTON CO-OPERATIVE BANK 

NEWTON CENTRE NEWTONVILLE 

NEWTON SOUTH CO-OPERATIVE BANK AUBURNDALE CO-OPERATIVE BANK WEST NEWTON CO OPERATIVE BANK 

NEWTON HIGHLANDS AUBURNDALE WEST NEWTON 

NEWTON-WALTHAM BANK AND TRUST COMPANY 

NEWTON NEWTON CENTRE NEWTONVILLE AUBURNDALE W VBAN NEWTON HIGHLANDS 

WEST NEW TON WALTHAM WESTON 


Miss Dorothy Hickie. repre- 
senting the American Youth 
Hostels, addressed the Newton 
Kiwanis Club’s noon meeting, 
at the Y.M.C.A.. last Wednes- 
day. The American Youth Hos- 
tels. Miss Hickie said are open 
to the “young in spirit." One 
member, an infant of six 
months, having used hostel 
facilities recently in the com- 
pany of her parents, while an 
elderly woman of sixty enjoyed 
a South American trip arran- 
ged by the organization last 
year. 

The hostels, with national 
headquarters in Northfield, 
Mass., are dedicated to those 
who would know the country 
better, according to Miss Hic- 
kie, and are usually in charge 
of "House Parents” who enjoy 
helping young people. The 
hospitality of American youth 
Hostels has been enjoyed 700,000 
times by passes during the past 
year, Miss Hickie concluded, and 
the A. Y. H. Magazine is publish- 
ed four times a year giving 
first hand information such 
subjects as trips, clubs, pro- 
jects, travel hints, churches, 
first aid and notes from the 
field. 

Kiwanis News 

. Five members from the Hyde 
Park-West Roxbury Club braved | 
the storm to attend the New- 
ton Club’s meeting. President 
William Sullivan announced 
that Kiwanis will soon complete 
the fire alarm project at the 
New England Peabody Home 
for Crippled Children. There 
will be a board of directors 
meeting at the Newton Co- 
operative Bank. Newtonville, 
March 4. at 7:30 p.m. Leonard 
Baker presented the Club with 
an attractively lettered plaque 
dedicated to the welcome of 
visiting Kiwanians. Edward W. ; 
Gallagher of the Boston Better j 
Business Bureau, will be the | 
speaker at the Kiwanis Club’s 
luncheon at the Y next Wednes- 
day. 

Mather Class 

The Mather class will meet on 
March 13 at 9:45 a.m. in the 
First Baptist Church. Subject 
“Windows O'er the World: China 
among the Powers." 

Mothers' Rest Club 

On Wednesday, March 6, at 
tiie home of Mrs. George Graves, 
891 Beacon street, Newton Cen- 
tre, the members of the Mothers 
Rost Club will meet to complete 
plans for their annual spring 
bridge luncheon. Before the 
meeting and the afternoon of 
sewing, Mrs. Graves will serve 
lunch, assisted by Mcsdamcs 
Charles Estabrook, Ilermon Holt 
Jr . E. F. Rockwood, Harry M. 
Sutton and Charles W. Wallour. 
-o 

Opportunity lor 
Aspiring Authors 

New writers wishing to sub- 
mit material for consideration 
for use oil “The Carrington Play- 
house" to start over WNAC and 
Yankee-Mutual stations on next 
Thursday, from 8 to 8:30 p.m., 
should write for entry blanks to 
"Carrington Playhouse," Post 
Office Box 140, New York, N. Y. 


Art Exhibit at 
Centre Woman's Club 

— o — 

The Art Committee of the New- 
ton Centro Woman’s Club will 
present the annual All-Newton 
Art Exhibition in the Club Gal- 
lery from March 8 through 
March 22. Any resident of New- 
ton may exhibit. 

Oils, water-colors, pastels, 
prints, drawings, and sculpture 
will be accepted. There will be 
no jury. A fee of 25 cents will be 
charged for each entry. 

I Work will be received at the 
Gallery on Tuesday, March 5, be- 
I tween ten a. m. and four p. m., 
and may be called for on Satur- 
day, March 23, during the same 
1 hours. 

' The Gallery will be open to 
visitors from two to four-thirty 
p. m., except Sundays. 

A Tea for the artists and their 
friends will be given by the Art 
. Committee in the Gallery from 
three to five p. m. on Saturday, 
March 16. 

Mrs. Ralph G. Hudson, Big. 
i 7331, and Mrs. Martin J. Connel- 
j ly, Big. 4336 are co-chairmen of 
I this exhibition, and will be glad 
to furnish further information. , 
' At the regular meeting of the 
; Club on Friday afternoon, March 
| 8, Arthur Moulton will present 
I “Quaint Quebec,” a colored mo- 
' tion picture with synchronized 
musical sequences. Preceding the 
program will be the usual coffee 
hour and business meeting. I 


Presidents' Day at 
Waban Woman's Club 

— o — 

Mrs. Edwin Troland, Presi- 
dent, Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Women’s Clubs, Mrs. 
Arthur W. Cornell, Twelfth Dis- 
trict Director, and Miss Adelaide 
B. Ball, President, Newton Fed- 
eration of Women’s Clubs, will be 
the guests of honor when the 
Waban Woman's Club meets next 
Monday afternoon in the Neigh- 
borhood Clubhouse. A reception 
and coffee will be held at one 
thirty, with the regular business 
meeting at two o’clock. Mrs. How- 
ard G. Musgrave, President, will 
preside. 

Following the meeting, the 
Music Committee will present 
Mr. Boris Goldovsky who is 
equally well known as a pianist 
and lecturer. Mr. Goldovsky will 
give a concert with comments 
entitled ‘The Romantic Compos- 
ers,’ including Mendelssohn, 
Chopin, Brahms, Schuman, and 
Liszt. 

At this meeting the Art Com- 
mitte, through the courtesy of 
Mr. W. H. Burnham, will exhibit 
a stained glass window in the 
main auditorium of the club. 


Peiice School P.T.A. To 
Sponsor Magic Show 

The Peirce School P.T.A. is 
sponsoring a magic show by Pro- 
fessor Ben, the magician, in the 
school auditorium on Monday 
afternoon, March 4. 


+ 


YOU ARE THE 
RED CROSS! 


Y OU, througli your local 
chapter, makeit possible 
for the Red cross to help 
our servicemen, veterans 
and our own here at home. 
Give today! 

YOUR RED CROSS MUST CARRY ON! GIVE! 

This advertisement is 
sponsored by 

Home Specialties Co., Inc. 

John M. Walker, Pres. 
NEWTON CENTRE 


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28. 1946 


_THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 



Dining With Jane and 


A Message to Mr. and Mrs. Citizen Kennedy— 


Bill — Hmm! Something smells good! What’s cooking? 

Jane — Can you guess? 

Bill — Well, it’s something different, I know that much. 

Jane — That’s right. You’ve talked about it so often since 
we had dinner at Tony and Mary’s that I thought you would 
guess right away. 

Bill-*- Say, do you mean veal cacciatorc? 

Jane — Right! 

Bill — Well, at last. It is one of my favorite Italian dishes. 
Junior will be interested; he has been asking about the food 
customs of other countries at school. 

Jane — I decided it was about time I learned how^ to make it, 
so I talked’ with Mary yesterday. She was so helpful and had 
lots of other recipes that we will have to try soon. 

Recipe for Veal Cacciatore: 

I can tomato paste 1 cup water 

1 can tomato soup 1 lb. veal (cut up) 

2 peppercorns 3 onions (diced) 

1 tsp. horseradish 3 green peppers (diced) 

Fried noodles 

1. Make sauce of tomato paste, tomato soup, peppercorns, 
horseradish and water; simmer for three hours. 

2. Braize veal and add to sauce after it has cooked with 
onions and peppers for one and one-half hours. 

3. Serve with fried noodles. Serves four. 

Other Italian recipes will be demonstrated at “What’s Cook- 
ing In Your Neighbor’s Pot?” which will be held on Tuesday 
evening, April 30, 1946, at 8 p.m. at the Newton YMCA. 

Newton Nutrition Center 

1357 Washington street, West Newton. BIG. 4911. 

Citizens arc welcome to come in for food and budget in- 
formation on Wednesdays from 10 to 12 a.m. 


JWV Post - 

( Continued from Page 1) 

The donation of the overbed 
tables is one of the many hos- 
pital activities being carired on 
by the Newton group under the 
direction of its chairman, Mrs. 
Harold A. Levcnthal. 

On Friday afternoon six mem- 
bers of the club will hold a 
weekly diversional crafts class 
for patients at the Veterans’ Hos- 
pital in West Roxbury. Mrs. Na- 
than Joseph is in charge, assist- 
ed by Mrs. Leventhal, Mrs. Paul 
Karol, Mrs. David Sherter, Mrs. 
Stanley Rosoff, Mrs. Morris Ros- 
enberg and Mrs. Louise Cohen. 
The club members assist the pa- 
tient^ in various arts and crafts, 
including metal and leather work 
and finger painting. 


Lutheran Church 
of the Newtons 

(Opposite the High School) 


CRAWFORD DOORS 

(Overhead type) 

for GARAGES 

PREK ESTIMATES GIVEN 

For Information Call 
WATERTOWN 6396 


Rawson- 

(Continued fr^m Page 1) 
turns for candidates for repre- 
sentative to the state secretary. 
The lattv shall transmit them 
to the Governor and council for 
canvass and notification of the 
elected candidates. This is now 
the procedure for certification of 
the records of votes of the state 
officers, and will make for sim- 
plification and uniformity in the 
election machinery. 

This is a change which has 
long been urged by the Mass. 
Town Clerks Association and the 
Mass. City Clubs Association. In 
districts composed of several 
towns it has been a difficult 
process to get in the returns 
promptly. There are districts 
in the western part of the state 
which consist of from 10 to 18 
towns. 


The Newton League of Women Voters 

CALLING ALL WOMEN 

The League of Women Voters is not only open to all women 
but eager to have as many as possible join. No woman needs 
l<» wait to be invitvl to become a member. Any woman may 
take the initiative herself and ask to become a member. The 
flues are maintained at $2.00 a year in order that no one may 
be barred on financial grounds. Application for membership 
may be made to Mrs. William R. Mattson, 28 Brookdalc road, 
Ncwtonville. 

A membership in the Newton League makes one automat- 
ically n member of the Massachusetts and National leagues. 
Indeed, these last are merely the associations of local leagues. 
They function through executive officers and boards, chosen by 
the local League members to carry on the work at the state 
and national levels. 

The work of the League falls into two main divisions, edu- 
cation and the promotion of measures which are deemed in the 
interest of the public as a whole. Interpreted broadly, “educa- 
tion” means the acquiring and spreading of information on poli- 
cies, measures, and candidates for public office. The “promotion 
of measures” attending hearings in legislative committees, writ- 
ing to Congressmen, and, also, sometimes working against harm- 
ful proposals. 

League members belong to all parties and represent all 
shades of opinion. The policies and measures upon which the 
League shall act are determined by the majority vote of the 
members in specific or general directives to the local, state, 
and national boards. Because of its non-partisan character and 
also because of the democratic method of deciding its activities, 
the League does not scatter its effort over every issue but works 
hard for or against those things which its members hold to be 
most vital to the general interest. 

League members have a two-fold satisfaction. First: through 
literature and speakers they receive up-to-date information on 
public affairs, giving them clef r and accurate knowledge which 
is invaluable to them in following the sometimes confused and 
often conflicting statements of press and radio. Second: they 
liave the satisfaction of feeling that they are sharing actively 
in this democratic government of ours, doing all that a plain 
citizen can do for the welfare and advancement of city, state, 
and nation. 


Red Cross- Teaching - 


"The Epidemic of Strikes Does 
Not Alarm Washington” (head- 
line)— of course -not, he's dead! 


430 WALNUT ST. 
Newtonville 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Newton Red Cross trains vol- 
unteers for Veterans’ Hospitals 
and civilian Hospitals — nurses’ 
aides and gray ladies; dietitian 
aides; arts and skills, and edu- 
cational aides to work with sick 
and wounded service men; motor 
corps drivers; home service vol- 
unteers and many others. The 
need for Red Cross trained vol- 
unteers will continue to exist for 
many months to come, for ci- 
j vilian hospitals can expect little 
or no relief until the needs of 
! military hospitals are filled. 

| Red Cross leads in community 
I preparedness — training Newton 
! residents in home nursing, first 
aid, nutrition, life saving and 
water safety. Through the co-op- 
I oration of Red Cross, Newton is 
participating actively in the pro- 
curement and distribution of 
blood plasma for civilian use, so 
that all citizens of Massachusetts 
may receive free of charge, any 
necessary transfusions. 

When your neighbor comes to 
get your contribution please have 
it ready because Red Cross must 
carry on. 



Which of these 13,000 Mortgage Plans 

Will Fit Your Needs Best? 

Should you make a large down payment, 
a small one, or (under the G. I. Bill) none 
at all? Pay off the principal of your loan in 
10, 15 or 20 years— or some other period? 
Make payments monthy, quarterly, yearly? 

Questions like these must be answered 
for each customer, individually — for your 
home financing problems are different from 
any other person’s. That's why it will pay) 
you to consult our bank, which has been 
making mortgage loans for 116 years — and 
which believes it has the most flexible loan- 
ing powers of any kind of lending agency 
in the community. 

We have a booklet showing more than 
13,000 monthly mortgage costs for loans of 
varying sizes, for varying lengths of time, 
and at various rates of interest. Somewhere 
in that wide range must surely be the one 
mortgage combination best suited to your 
needs. Come in and let us discuss your home 
financing problems — today! Or send for 
our free booklet "A Friendly Chat About 
Mortgages". 



NEWTON 

Savings Mank 


286 Washington Street at Newton Corner 
JV tu> inn's Oldest Bank 


Church Service 
10:45 A. M. 




ANIMAL 

HOSPITAL 


Complete Facilities 

DR. R. C. SCHOFIELD 

It mi BEACON ST. — BIGelow 436* 


(Continued from Page 1) 

iversitjf School of Education, has 
been elected a teacher for the 
primary grades effective in Sep- 
tember next. 

A sabbatical leave has been 
granted Lt. Comdr. Russell A. 
Fitz for the school year 1946 and 
1947. He was a mathematics in- 
structor at Newton High School. 

Barbara J. Langdon, sixth 
grade teacher at the Oak Hill 
School, was granted a leave of 
absence until September. She is 
studying for a master’s degree 
at the University of Southern 
California. 

Caroline A. Doonan, teacher of 
English at the Newton High 
School, was given a leave of ab- 
sence until March 25 because of 
illness. 


Camp Day - 

( Continued from Page 1) 

At the reunion last Saturday 
night, in addition to Chairman 
Dunker, "Doc” Simmons, and Mr. 
Gores, at the head table were 
Thomas E. Shirley, Arnold C. 
Barker, and JHarry W. Bascom of 
the camp committee and Clar- 
ence R. Mease, general secretary. 

Registrations for the 1946 sea- 
son are coming in daily at the 
camp winter headquarters at the 
Newton Y.M.C.A. First prefer- 
ence is being given to former 
campers. Other Newton boys 
are invited to make their applica- 
tions immediately. 


ANIMAL CLINIC 
and HOSPITAL 

Free Diagnosis. 9:00 to 4:00 Dallyl 
Saturday. 0:00 to 13:00 
SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 
MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY 
South St.. Waltham • Tel. WAL. US0 


Sunday School 
9:30 A. M. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

from Harvard in 1940. During 
the summer of 1938 he worked in 
th American Embassy In Paris, 
having previously spent much 
time with his father during Jos- 
eph P. Kennedy’s service as Am- 
erican Ambassador in London. 
In 1940, Jack Kennedy wrote 
"Why England Slept,” a study 
of British rearmament policy 
which received wide attention 
and favorable comment through 
out this country. 

In September, 1941, Jack Ken- 
nedy joined the Navy and served 
in motor torpedo boats through- 
out the stormy course of the Sol- 
omon Islands campaigns. He 
commanded a PT boat which was 
rammed and sunk off Bougain- 
ville while attempting a torpedo 
attack on a Japanese destroyer, 
and was picked up eight days 
later. He was awarded the Navy 
and Marine Corps medal for "ex- 
tremely heroic conduct for sav- 
ing three men’s lives and also 
received the Purple Heart. For 
a year thereafter, he was hos- 
pitalized as a result of injuries 
and was retired from the United 
States Navy last April. 

John Hersey, author of "A Bell 
for Adamo” whote a saga of 
the exploits of Lieutenant Ken- 
nedy and his crew in the South 
Pacific which appeared in the 
New Yorker 1944 under the title 
"Courage,” and was later reprint- 
ed in the Reader’s Digest. 

As a reporter, Jack Kennedy 
covered the San Francisco Con- 
ference for the Chicago Herald- 
American and afterwards repre- 
sented International News Serv- 
ice at the British election in 
Ireland and Europe. 

At the present time, Mr. Ken- 
nedy Is serving as general chair- 
man of the 1946 Convention of 
the Veterans of Foreign Wai/j 
which is to be held in Boston 
during the later part of next 
August. 


A. L. Auxiliary 
Sponsors Coffee 
Hour at Hospital 

— o - 

The Newton Unit, American Le- 
gion Auxiliary sponsored a Coffee 
Hour at. the Waltham Regional 
Hospital on Sunday, coffee, can- 
dy, cookies and cigarettes were 
served. The pourers, Mrs. Cath- 
; erine Chandonait. and Mrs. Ruth 
DeManno, were asisted by Mrs. 
Dorothy Paterson and Mrs. Anne 
McPherson. 

Several of the younger mem- 
I bers of the unit served as junior 
: hostesses. The entertainment con- 
! sisted of songs by Miss Peggy 
Lambert, accompanied at the pi- 
ano by Miss Marion Hiltz and se- 
j lections on his electric guitar by 
Herbert Bradbury. Following the 
j entertainment in the recreation 
, room they visited several of the 
wards entertaining patients who 
| were confined to their beds. 

The party was under the direc- 
tion of Miss Margaret McPher- 
son, president of the Newton 
Unit. Miss Anna Mannion, coun- 
ty chairman for the Waltham Re- 
gional Hospital expressed satis- 
faction and pleasure to the New- 
ton group and invited the hostes- 
ses to take part in a dance to be 
held at the hospital on March 8. 


page rivE 


FOR 


MORTGAGE 

MONEY 


Call at 


West Newton Savings Bank 

WEST NEWTON 


A. A. KENNELS 

Mra. Emmett Warbnrtoa 
DOGS TRIMMED 
BOARDED «nd FOR SALS 
S41 Nahanton HI.. Newton Centro 
BIGelow S400 




Lt . Moan- 

( Continued from Page 1) 

1926 he was promoted to sergeant 
and to lieutenant in 1930. and has 
been in command of the night 
platoon since 1930. 

He served with the 301st Field 
Artillery in France in World War 
I- He has four sons, Edvfird A., 
Jr., who is studying for the 
priesthood at the Oblate College 
in Washington; William F. who 
served in the Navy for 40 months, 
attaining the rank of PM 1-c, 
and who recently returned home 
from Japan and received his dis- 
charge; PhM 2-c Robert J., who is 
stationed at Oceana, Virginia and 
Paul D. who entered the Navy 
about a month ago and is now in 
boot training at Bainridge, Mary- 
land. 

The family home is at 9 Par- 
menter terrace, West Newton. 

Central Club 

(Continued from Page .1 ) 

an authority on snakes and has 
lectured at the New England 
Museum of Natural History, at 
the Newton Rotary Club and 
High School. He has made a 
research of New England snakes 
and entered a thesis on this sub- 
ject at Harvard. Harris has also 
contributed articles to "Nature" 
magazine. 

As an added attraction, Robert 
Weiner, regional director of the 
Department of Information for 
France, will speak on the present 
French situation. Weiner is head | 
of the French Press and Infor- 
mation Service, the official 
French Press organ in the Unit- 
ed States. 


L. CONTE 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

Expert service to satisfy your desire. Alter or repair your home. 
Playroom re-modeling and cabinet work are our specialties. 
Many Newton and Brookline residents have patronized our services. 

Telephone NEEdham 1309-M 



Authorized 

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9S1 WATERTOWN ST. W. REWTON LAS.II 9492 


Special Lenten 
Services 

Wednesday 8 P. M. 
Starting March 6 


McKinley- 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tralia. Mrs. McKinley will speak 
Wednesday noon, inarch 13, at a 
luncheon meeting under the aus- 
pices of the Women’s Council, 
Mrs. W. D. Russell presiding. Her 
topic will be "Under The Sea To 
Safety." The women of the New- 
tonville Congregational Church 
will be guests. The meeting will 
be at the Second Congregation- 
al Church, West Newton. 

Mrs. McKinley, wife of Dean 
James F. McKinley of Silliman 
University. Dumaguete, Philip- 
pine Islands, is, like her husband, 
a Congregational educationalist 
under the American Board of 
Foreign Missions. The McKinleys 
first went to the Islands in 1930 
and have had one furlough. 

When word came of Pearl Har- 
bor, the McKinleys were forced to 
decide whether they would flee to 
the mountains in hope of evading 
the enemy, or stay and surrend- 
er. They chose flight, and for 
over two years they lived a life 
of impending disaster, often 
escaping from one hiding place 
after another only a few hours 
ahead of their pursuers. 

What they did. how they man- 
aged to survive on food often 
taken straight from the jungle: 
how their Filipino friends risked 
freedom and even life to protect 
them; how they dwelt with 
pagan tribes: how they tramped 
barefoot over mountain trails or 
shot wild rapids on flimsy bam- 
boo rafts, is only part of what 
Mrs. McKinley can tell. In those 
two and a half dramatic years 
the family lived in no less than 
23 different places and were 
forced to make sudden flights at 
least 11 times. 

Mrs. McKinley, in addition to 
her duties as wife and mother, 
was Assitant Professor of Music 
at Silliman University School of 
Theology. She taught courses in 
the fundamentals of music. She 
showed the young deaconesses 
and ministers’ wives how to get 
real music out of a little folding 
organ and how best to teach and 
sing hymns. 

Her home was a hospitable 
center, with the latchstring al- 
ways out. Prayer groups met 
there and students flocked in for 
advice on personal problems, in- 
cluding love and marriage. The 
undernourished found not merely 
comfort but eggs, milk and 
simple remedies for their ail- 
ments. At the McKinleys' there 
was always access to good music, 
and after church on Sundays 
groups would gather to hear the 


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Victrola and drink in the world's 
best music. 

Silliman University, where the 
McKinleys had been at work up 
to the time of Pearl Harbor, 
trains the vital young Filipino 
pastors and other religious lead- 
ers for the United Evangelical 
Church of the Philippines. It is a 
joint project in which both Con- 
gregational and Presbyterian 
churches participate. 


Applejack- 

(Ccftitinued from Page 1 

Hackett which had a long run 
on Broadway. 

Wallace Eddinger will play the 
leading role. Other members of 
the cast are: Randolph Merrill 
as Lush: Gladys McCullough as 
Poppy Faire; Helen Lonsberry 
as Mrs. Agatha Whatcombe: Al- 
vin Whittemore as Ambrose Ap- 
plejohn: Lorraine Holmes as An- 
na Yalesk; Edna White as Mrs. 
Pemgrad; Harold Lousburg as 
Horace Pengard: Russell Baker 
as Ivan Bowlsky: Sally Pilsbury 
as Palmer, a maid: Loring Kid- 
der as Dennet and Elmer Pils- 
bury as Johnny Jason. 

Coaching the production is 
Miss Louise Wetherbee — assist- 
ed by: Charles W. Peterson and 
John E. Adams. Properties: Mrs. 
Kathryn Abrams. Costumes; 
Chester Hervev. Stage Manager: 
Robert Dailing. Scenery. 

The curtain rises for each per- 
formance at S p.m. Tickets will 
be on sale at the door 


MacCloskey 

( Continued from Page 1) 

Of equal interest, is the an- 
nouncement that a well-known 
Newton man has ben engaged to 
appear with the acting company 
next week. Mr. Edmund M. Mac- 
Closkey joins the company in the 
comedy "The Family Upstairs” 
the Broadway comedy hit, which 
ran two years in New York. 

Brattle Hail is famous not only 
because such stars of stage and 
screen have appeared on its 
stage, but because the nation's 
only stock company is now in its 
72nd week, and selling out every 
night. Night after night, the 
Boston Stock Company has been 
playing to capacity audiences. 

Every great play in the history 
of the American theatre is to be 
presented by this company, rang- 
ing from "East Lynne” and 
"Charley's Aunt" to "Claudia.” 
Some of the plays are so enthu- 
siastically received that they are 
held over for a second and a third 
week. 

Included in the regular acting 
company are Marty O'Brien, pop- 
ular leading woman. Alan Moore, 
Broadway actor, playing the lead- 
ing male roles. Rex King, dis- 
tinguished actor and lecturer. 
Bill Story. Alison Hawley, for 
twenty years identified with the 
theatre. Bill Story. Joan Evans, 
Martha Ladson, and others, com- 
plete the company. Mr. Edmund 
MacCloskey of Columbus Street. 
Newton, wil also apepar next 
week. 


Do you have 
YOUR SHARE? 


r^" L 

’ , LOWEST m 

— COST w 


We Preach 

A Changeless 
Christ for a 
Changing W orld 


com momtk vi th 
.M v>s vc III - 1 I i - 

Middlesex, ss. Pi: ^ 1 

To all persons interest* 
trust ea 

Karle K. l Miwav 
li’e of Newt '!i - i 

< v.ised, for the be 
Conway. 

The trustee of said e- a*e 
sente.l to said Court for 
his first account 

If you desire >’• v : rj 
or your attorney u d - 
appearance in said Court 
2 efora - 

noon on the eleventh day 
the return 


w 


Jo' 




J Udge 

eighteenth day of February n 
year one thousand nitre hundred a 
forty -s.x. 

LORING P. JORDAN. 

Regia 


Somebody Jooling at tbe back of t/ourrreeb? * 




Visit your BARBER re^ularlg 

IT PAYS TO LOOK WETL 


Thrifty Massachusetts people 
now own more than $2(70,000,000 
of Savings Hank Life Insurance. 
.Sow is (he time (o give your family 
its share of (his safe protection, 
sold over-the-counter at lowest 
cost. Remember: no medical ex- 
amination is required for $300 of 
insurance on children in good 
health at ages from one month to 
15 years. You save by being your 
own salesman. 

Coil or t trim 

^NEWTON 

Savings Hank 

W.+u'*. twin it Ni»i»« (mm 



COMMUNITY BARBERS Aawlon 

a suo* up PiwrtsvoN.iL ua> its 


U-i 


vrn If YOU Don’t Need Insor- 
F.milr DOLh! 


STONE INSTITUTE and* 
NEWTON HOME lor 
AGED PEOPLE 


This Homs is entirely supported by 
th* saneroAtty oi Newton cltlsene end. 
«» solicit fund" for endowment and 
enlargement oi the Home. 

DIRECTORS 
Mis Arthur U Allen 
Mrs. Ucorta tv Bsrtiell 
Mis. Stanley Bolster 
Albert P. Carter 
Mr*. Albert P Carter 
William F. Chasa 
Howard P Comers# 

Marshall B Dalton 
Mrs M B Dalton 
Mrs James Dunlop 
Mrs W V M Fswcett 
Mrs Marjorie M Gardiner 
Mrs Paul M Goddard 
Frank J Halt 
Mrs. W E Hardin* 

Mra Fred ft. Hayward 
T. E Jewell 
Seward W Jonea 
Mra Arthur W Lana 
Robert H Loomis 
Mrs Elmore J MacPhle 
Donald P McKay 
Metcalf W Melcher 
Mra M W Melcher 
John E Peakes 
Mra John E Peakea 
George K. Raw eon 
Mrs. Georgs K Kawton 
William IL ftice 
Mrs. Frank L. Kicnardson 
Miss MabrfeL Riley 
Mra. Charles A Bawtn 
Mra. Charles L Smith 
Mrs Oeorie S Smith 
Clifford H Walker 
Thomas A West 

METCALF W MELCHER. Piesldent 
1*7 Lake Ave Newton Centro 
RUBIK l H LOOM ltt. Treasures 
W0 Forest A*e.. Weal Newton 


Sermon Topic for Sun. 

"Behold, We Go 
Up To Jerusalem” 


Hours ior Canning 
In Tin Announced 

— O — 

Beginning in March, the first 
Wednesday and Friday of each 
month from 1:30 to 3 pm. have 
been designated for "Canning in 
Tin by the Nutrition Commit* 
tee of Newton Red Cross. In- 
struction is given at the Chapter 
House. 21 Foster street. Newton- 
ville and cans are supplied at a 
; cost of five cents each. All food 
is prepared at home and brought 
to the Chapter House ready for 
canning. Cookies, candy, jellies, 
jams, peanut butter, nuts, etc., 
.ire readily packed for shipment 
to your servicemen overseas. A 
call to Lasell 6000 stating the 
number of cans needed would be 
helpful. . \ 


7 <, act tU 

Un com 


★ OIL BURNER 

★ FUEL OIL 

★ BURNER SERVICE 

Petro Oil Heating Equipment 
is backed by over 40 years of 
outstanding oil heating instal- 
lations in buildings from bun- 
galow to skyscraper. 

Commonwealth 3400 
LAS 0328 


Coll 1 


PETROLEUM 

HEAT & POWER COMPANY 

419 Boylilon St.. Boston 


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Invitation to 
Worship With US 


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Wood or Metal 

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Bronze Wire 
Now Available 

Place Ordera NOW 
For Guaranteed Delivery 

Home Specialties 
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PAUL MX 


THE NEWTON graphic 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1948 


Introducing 

miM DOWN REALTY AIDS 

J^oveliness 



CREATED FROM 
RARE 

GOATS' MILK and 
OTHER FINE 
INGREDIENTS 


A*" new f idea, new’ lovelier' YOU 1 Hillshire Down 
preparations ere designed to Help make problem-com- 
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in and let our special representative explain the benefits 
of these new.beauty aids." 

If A II \ 

DRUB STORE. Inc. 

Carl N, Alvord, Re*. Pharm. 

President 

105 UNION IT., NEWTON CTR. 

Sk ihhihrj 1<W7 BlOelow 0360 




WEDDINGS 


White - Wiley 

— o — 

A reception In th*' Church Ves- 
try followed the marriage on 
Monday of Miss Barbara E. Wi- 
ley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Sumner K. Wiley of 271 Waban 
avenue, Waban and Ens. Robert 
L. White, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leon L. White of 46 Wyoming 
street, Newtonville. The double 


NEWTON CHURCHES 


THE FIRST CHURCH OF 
CHRIST. SCIENTIST 

— o — 

In The Mother Church, The 
First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
in Boston. Massachusetts, and In 
all of Its branches, a Lesson- 
Sermon will be read on Sunday, 
March 3, on the subject, “Christ 
Jesus." 

The Golden Text. “Behold, the 
ring ceremony was performed by da Y s come, saith the Lord, that 
the bride s uncle, Rev. Walter B. I will raise unto David a right- 
Wiley of the Pilgrim Church in eous Branch, and a King shall 
Pittsfield, and Rev. Joseph S. re ign and prosper, and shall exe- 
MacDonald in the Union Church, j cute judgment and Justlce ln the 

Given ln marriage by her earth ... And this is Hto name 
father, the bride was attended by whereby he shall be called. THE 
Miss Margaret Hughes of Chevy LORD OUR RIGHTEOUSNESS," 
Chase. Maryland, a classmate at | * s ^ rom Jeremiah 23:5, 6. Other 
Simmons College, as maid of . Scriptural selections include,; 
j honor. The bridemaids were Har- I A |? d ,hp " ord was mado 1 

riet Dins moor and Prudence ' * nd d "’ p t amon F us > (and we 
Speirs, also students at Simmons, ^held his glory, the glory as of 
and Dorothy Whittemore of West I lhp °. nl Y be * otten of ,hp Fafh ' 


TINA COSTA, E.D.* 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 
PERMANENTLY REMOVED 

MULTIPLE NEEDLE METHOD 

Consultation Free 

For appointment, cadi ln person or 
TELEPHONE WALTHAM 9041-M 

Lawrence Bldg. — f»Rl Main Si. 
ROOM 14 

Central Square Waltham 

PARKING IN REAR OF BUILDING 


DR. FRANK A. JASSET 

Podiatrist -- Chiropodist 

Now Located at 
S91 CENTRE STREET 

NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 


MAY LUCAS 

jj COSMETIC CONSULTANT 

distributor of f] 

jj LUZIER’S fi 

jl COSMETICS and PER FUMES U 
85 ADAMSON ST. U 

ALLSTON Tel. ALG. 2464U 


Roxbury and Jane Mullineaux of 
Waban. The bride and her atten- 
dants wore satin brocade gowns 
of the same style, with the ex- 
ception. that the bride's white 
gown had a train. She carried a 
! shower bouquet of white sweet 
1 peas with orchids. Miss Hughes 
wore pink brocade satin and car- 
ried her roses and mixed sweet 
! peas while the bridemaids, two 
! in yellow and two in aqua car- 1 (p. 350>. 
ried bouquets of mixed sweet 1 
peas. Barbara Neilson, in pale 
| pink taffeta, was the flower girl. 

! The wedding ceremony fol- 
lowed commencement exercises 
•at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, at which time the 
bridegroom was commissioned an 
Ensign. The best man and ushers 
were all classmates of the groom 
and also received their commis- 
jl } sions as Ensigns. Ensign George 
ll Ley was the best man and the 
ll ushers were Ensigns Kenneth 
2 i Davis, Gene Parrish, Edwin Teb- 
betts and Louis Martin. 


er.) full of grace and truth' 1 
(John 1:14 b 

Also included In the Lesson- 
Sermon will be the following 
passage from the Christian 
Science textbook. "Science and 
Health with Key to the Scrip- 
tures” by Mary Baker Eddy, “Di- 
vine Truth must be known by its 
effects on the body as well as 
on the mind, before the Science 
of being can be demonstrated" 


LUTHERAN CHURCH OF 
THE NEWTONS 

— o — 

Opposite the High School 
430 Walnut St., Newtonville 
Rev. Arthur H. Block, Pastor 

Church sendee, 10:45 a. m.; 
Sunday School, 9:30 a. m. 


COMMUNITY CHURCH 
OF BOSTON 


— o — 

“What I Like about 


Roman 


NEWTON CORNER 
METHODIST CHURCH 

— o — 

Everett L. Fnrnsworth, Minister 

Service of public worship at 
10:30 a.m,: pre-Lenten sermon 
and Holy Communion. Church 
school for Bible study at 11:50 
a.m. Young adult group at 6:45 
p.m.: “Informal Hymn Sing" In 
Fellowship hall at 8 o'clock. Miss 
Elizabeth Winslow will be the 
leader. 

— o — 

Welcome Circle of the Newton 
Corner Methodist church will 
meet in the Trowbridge room 
Wednesday night at 8 o’clock. 

— o — 

The first of five mid-week Len- 
ten services will be hold Thurs- 
day night at 8 o’clock in the 
sanctuary of the Newton Corner 
Methodist church. Guest speak- 
er, Rev. John Bruch of the An- 
dover Newton Seminary. 

— o — 

The World Day of Prayer will 
be observed Friday, March 8th, 
at 2:30 p.m. with a special serv- 
ice in the Newton Centre Metho- 
dist church. 


RECENT DEATHS 


Curtains 



• COTTAGE SETS 

• DINETTE SETS 

• LUNCHEAN SETS 

• BRIDGE SETS 

• BUREAU SCARFS 

• 

The 

LAWRENCE 

SHOP 

1300 WASHINGTON STREET 
W E S T N E W T O N 

Tiro doors from 
t Neicton Theatrt 


NEW CITIZENS 


Mr. and Mrs. F. Lawton Swett 


Ensign and Mrs. White left on Catholics" will be the subject of 
a wedding trip to Maine, after the address to be given by Dr 

which the bride wmre^rne her : John Haynes ^ ^ 

studies at Simmons College and , i 

the groom will be stationed in njoming service of the Com- 
Newport, Rhode Island. They munity Church of Boston at 
both graduated in 1943 from the Jordan Hall, Sunday, March 3, ! 


Newton High School. 


(Jean Brown) of Newton High- ^ 

lands announce the birth of their _ , i 

third child, Janet Benson Swett MarqUardt-bteinberg 
on February 19 at the Newton- ~ 

Wellesley Hospital. | M1 „ CTna T . innea stenberg 


at 10:30 o’clock. Dr. Holmes Is 
the minister of the New York 
Community Church and chair- 
man of the American Civil Lib- 
erties Union. He is the author of 
numerous books which include 
"New Churches for Old," and 
“Rethinking Religion." He is the 
editor of "Unity," a liberal re- 
ligious journal. 

The services will be conducted 
by the minister, Rev. Donald G. 
Lothrop, and the usual question 
period will follow. Charles J. 
Rideout will be at the organ. 


ENGAGEMENTS 



THE OVAL DINING ROOM 
DINNER 

Sunday. March 3, 1946 

Daiquiri 50 Dubonnet 45c 

Old Fashioned 50c 

Fruit Cup 


romato Juice Co 
Fresh 1 
Onion Soup 
Orumtt- am 
Consort 
Fus 

Dinner liol 
Wh 

Roast Prime Ribs of Bee:, i 
Broiled Ciuctcc-n • n.i'.t) 
Currant Jelly 
Roust S'.ulfeci Turkey \ 
Cranberry Sauer 
Frcih Lobster New bur* 
en cassi 


hriinp Cockt 
vith Clierje Crouton* 


Wa 


ar Cured Ham 

■ hire Sauce 
Kin* Salmon, mi 
olel 


Broiled 
de h 
Broiled 
bearnniee Sauce 
Fried Filet or Sole, Tat 
Baked. M milled or Drill 
Urec-n Pm <• Stew 
Hubbard Sou 
Siilud Chlffoi 
Apple Pu 


11 65 
1.63 
1.63 
1 60 
1.35 
1 30 

I 33 
e 1.40 
•Utoes 




Bleu Cheeae. Toasted Cracker* 
Freeh Feu re 

Colire Tea Milk 

Seven beautifully decorated party 
rooms available for Luncheons, 
Banquets Social Affa rs. 

Luncheons arc frorp 80c to SI 25 
Dinner from $1 25 to $1.75 

Telephone ASPinwoll 6800 

ROBERT B STOCKING, 
General Manager 

Hotel Beaconsfield 

A Shmruton Hotel 


— o — 

Grandparents are Mrs. Simeon Miss Elna ^Linnea ----- - 

Brown of Arlington and Mrs. and Arthur charles Marquardt. 

Frank M. Swett of Newton Jr. were married last Saturday 
Centre. : in the Gordon Chapel of the Old 

— o— ! South Church, Boston. White 

Lt. Richard W. Sweetnam USA, flowers decorated the chapel 
and Mrs. Sweetnam (Gretchen for the 4.30 o’clock candlelight 
Lane) of Waban, anounce the ceremony performed by the 
birth of a daughter, Alicia Lane r GVi j jee Delmar Bergsman. A 
Sweetnam on February 19 at the reception followed in the Wo- 
Waltham Regional Hospital. man’s Republican Club in Bos- 
Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. ton. The bride is the daughter 
Herbert D. Lane and Mr. and of Mrs. Frank Oscar Stenberg 
Mrs. A. Harry Sweetnam, all of of 34 Waverley Avenue, New- 
Waban. Great-grandparents are ton and the groom 13 the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Lane Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Marqu- 
of Newport, Vermont and Mr. ardt of 20 Crofton Road, Wa- 
James W. McKay of North Hat- ban. 

ley, Quebec. I With her gown of ivory satin, 

• — q_ : the bride wore a circular veil of 

Born, a daughter, Barbara Ann. net which was caught to an 
to Lt. and Mrs. William J. Healey ivory satin cap. Her bouquet 
Jr., at Vallejo, California. Lieut, combined Eucharist hikes and 
Healey graduated from Newton ' orchids. Miss Jean Marquardt, 

High School in 1942 when he en- ! 3ist , er the groom, was the 
tered the navy. He is at present maid of honor, and the bndes- 
stationed at Mare Island. Cal. maids were M ' ss . Elsi ® , J 
Mrs. Healey is a native of Har- ° A l e 

rishm-tr Pa Miss Elizabeth Ann Kobrock of 

6 ' * Newtonville. The attendants 

wore ice blue taffeta gowns and ly has been stationed at Chanute 

carried bouquets of gladolia. Field, Illinois and after a thirty 

Mrs. Stenberg in royal blue chif- day furlough will report to 

fon and Mrs. Marquardt In rose Greensboro, North Carolina, 
crepe both wore corsages of 1 — o — 

orchids. Mr. and Mrs. Lee Manning 

Bradford Riley, of Needham. Coons of Shaker Heights, Ohio, 

was the best man and the ushers announce the engagement of 

included John Milton of their daughter, Miss Marian Man- 

_ St. Louis, Frank Stenberg. ning Coons to Capt. William Rob- 

wedding reception following the brother of the bride. Theodore . inson Lacy, USA, son of Col. and 
marriage of Miss Betty Kanavof Wools ton of Newton and Fred Mrs. Clive Woodbury Lacy of 261 

to Harry Rodcf of Somerville. C. Wells of Lexington. Nahanton street, Newton Centre. 

The Oval room was the scene Mrs. Marquardt was gradua- Miss Coons is a graduate of 
of a wedding reception on Mon- ted Lom the Hickox Secretarial the L aure i School in Cleveland 

day following the marriage of School in Boston. Mr. Marqu- 

Miss Gertrude DeLary to Joseph ardl rPCen ^y completed his ter- i es j e y 
O'Brien of Brookline. ITlinal leave aftpr s / r X lng . Wlth Clevel 


Lieut. Healey is the son of Wil- 
liam J. Healey of 320 Adams 
street, Newton. 

Newton and 
Brookline Social Center 

On Sunday the Grand Ball 
room was the background for 


Mr. and Mrs. James Goodrich 
Parker of 20 Birch Hill road, 
Newtonville, announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Miss 
Mary Lee Parker to • James 
Stuart Johnson, USAAF, son of 
Airs. Van B. Johnson of 95 War- 
wick road, West Newton and the 
late Mr. Johnson. 

Miss Parker is a direct decen- 
dent of Robert Treat Paine, a 
signor of the Declaration of In- 
dependence. Mr. Johnston recent- 


CENTRAL CONG. CHURCH 
OF NEWTON 
Newtonville 

Rev. Randolph Seaman Merrill, 
Minister 

Mrs. Robert L. Monroe, 
Director of Education 

— o — 

9:30 a. m., Church School. 

10:50 a. m., Worship service. 
“The Fellowship of PrdYer" will 
be Mr. Merrill’s topic for the ser- 
mon. 

7:00 p. m., Young People’s So- 
ciety. 

Monday, March 4, 6:30 p. m., 
Central Club Supper. Following 
Hie super, Mr. Norman Harris, j 
instructor in Biology In Belmont 
Hills Private School, will speak 
on “Shakes." 

Tuesday, March 5, 8:00 p. m., 
Religious Education Committee 
meeting. 

Wednesday, March 6, Woman’s j 
Association. 10 a. m., Handwork. 
12:30 p. m., luncheon. 1:30 p. m., 
Program. Mrs. Alfrieda M. Mosh- 
er, Cultivation Secretary of the 
International Institute, Inc., of 
Boston, will speak on “Yester- 
days in Europe." 3:30 p. m„ An 
Ash Wednesday Communion 
Service will be held in the Church 
Sanctuary. 4:30 p. m., Service for 
boys and girls. 

Thursday, March 7, 8 p. m., 

First Lenten Meeting. “Religion . 
and Life" will be Mr. Merrill's 
topic. 8:30 p. m., Couples’ Club 
dance at Auburndale Club,. 283 
Melrose street, Auburndale. 


The Brookline Junior Chamber 
of Commerce gave an apprecia- 
tion dinner to the town officials 
on Tuesday in the Gold room. 

The Rotary Anns held their 
monthly meeting with luncheon 
on Wednesday in the Gold room 
A wedding reception was held 
ln the Gold room bn Friday fol- 
lowing the marriage of Miss Bar- 
I bara Jean Sweeney to John .J. 

( Costello, both of Brighton. 


the Army. Corps of Engineers 
in both the European and Paci 
fic areas. He was graduated 
from the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, where he 
was a member of Delta Upsilon. 

Corbin - Nevin 


and Pine Manor College in Wei- 
She made her debut at the 
eland 1941 Assembly - Ball 
and is a member of the Junior 
League. 

Captain Lacy, now on terminal 
leave after serving for 22 months | 
in the European theater, is a 
graduate of Phillips Exeter Aca- 1 
demy and Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, where he was 
a member of Beta Theta Pi. 


A wedding of Newton In- 
terest which took place last 
FoilowingThe mTiriagP of Miss Thursday In St. Mary's Chapel 
' Romona Warren of Belmont to of the Washington Cathedral of | daughter, Barbara, to Wesley 
Homer Woolridge on Saturday St. Peter and St. Paul was that Brewster Hill, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
a wedding reception too place in ot - Mrs> Mary Saltonstall Nevin J CJiarles H. Hill of Springfield. 

th ?,?° l i r0C T t-'t u of 50 Tyler Terrace, Newton 

Miss Evelyn King became the c , and wmiam I. 

i bride of Lt. E. 1. Kinchca, AAF, Washington, D. C. 
on Thursday, and a wedding re- Theodore Q. Wedol performed ! Mr. Hill, recently discharged 

I ception took place in the Blue the ceremony which was followed from active duty in the Navy, 

by a reception at the Wardman f 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Morri- 
son of Newton Highlands* an- 
nounce the engagement of their 


Miss Morrison is a student at 
Corbin Tufts College, majoring in occu 
Canon 1 patinnal therapy. 


Setiou . 

[COCKTAILS-DINNERj 

-THE irf< 


hunt 



■lyOT 

OPEN FROM 3PM.: SUNDAY I P.M. 
MUSIC BY MUZAK 



Park Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
: Atwood were the attendants. 

Mrs. Corbin Is the daughter of 
I the late Mr. and Mrs. Francis G. 
Saltonstall of New York and is a 
descendant of Governors John 
I Endicott and John Winthrop of 
Massachusetts and of Governor 
- Guidon Saltonstall of Connecti- 
cut. She is the widow of Charles 
j K. B. Nevin. Mr. Corbin was 
graduated from Amherst College 
and studied at Yah*. Harvard and 
Oxford. He was the husband of 
the late Ethel Olin Corbin. He 
' recently retired after 19 years as 
librarian of the Smithsonian In- 
stitute and Custodian of the 
Smithsonian deposit in the Li- 
biary of Congress. Mr. and Mrs. 
Corbin will live In Washington 
| and Newton Centre. 


was formerly a member of the 
Navy R.O.T.C at Tufts College in ! 
tiie School of Engineering. An 
early summer wedding is plan- 
ned. 

— o — 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Leg 
gotta ol Wllllamaton, North Car- 
olina, announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Miss Naomi 
Raye Leggette to John A. Metz, 
son or Mr. and Mrs. John Metz of 
Newton Centre. 

Miss Leggette is a graduate of 
tin- Miami School of Modeling. 
Mr. Metz attended the American 
Institute of Hanking. He was re- 
cently discharged after four 
years in the Armed Forces and Is 
now employed by Carver and 
Company. 

No date has been set for the 
wedding. J 


THE ELIOT CHURCH 
OF NEWTON 

— o — 

Dr. Ray A. Eusden, Minister 

Sunday — 9:30 Primary and 
Junior departments of the church 
school; 10:45 Communion serv- 
ice of worship with sermon by 
Dean Vaughan Dabney; 10:45 
Nursery and Kindergarten de- 
partments of the church school; 
12:05 Young People’s Division: 
Junior High, High School and El- 
iot Round Table. A service of 
stereoptican pictures, music and 
poetry will be presented by Miss 
Anne Avantaggio and her class 
of ninth grade girls who have 
been studying “The Life of 
Christ in Art.” 

Christ in Art." 4-6 the staff of 
the church school will be "at 
home" to the parents. 

Monday — 10-4, Red Cross Sew- 
ing Unit. 

Tuesday — The Woman's As- 
sociation; 9:30 Sewing and surg- 
ical dressings; 10 Meeting of ex- 
ecutive board; 11; 30, Business 
meeting; 12:30 Luncheon, hostess 
Mrs. Henry R. Condon. Speaker 
Miss Roberta Kellogg, attendance 
supervisor of the Newton School 
department; 8 The Business 
Group will meet with the Misses 
Conway, 2G9 Church street. Mrs. 
Charles D. Kepner will speak on 
"Easter in Bethlehem." 

Wednesday— 3:30 Junior choir 
rehearsal; 5 Junior High choir re- 
hearsal; 7:30 Church choir re- 
hearsal; 8:15 Meeting of the El- 1 
iot Arts Guild in the chapel. 

Thursday Lenten meetings. 3 J 
“All Aboard for Understanding." 
Opening meetingof the Lenten 
program for primary and junior 
boys and girls. 7:45 First in a 
series of addresses on "Some In- 
teresting Books in the Old Test- 
ament." Dr. Eusden will speak 
on “Ruth: A Book of Fiction." 

Friday — World Day of Prayer. 
2:30 Service in the Newton Cen- 
tre Methodist church under the 
auspices of the Newton Council 
of Church Women. Mrs. Leslie 
E. Swain, president of the North- 
ern Baptist Convention will 
speak. 5:00 Rehearsal of the 
Verse Speaking choir. 


EGIDE DEvSORCY 

— o — 

Funeral services for Egide De- 
sorcy, a veteran of World War II, 
who died suddenly on Sunday, 
February 17, were held Thursday 
morning. A high mass of requiem 
was celebrated in St. John the 
Evangelist Church by Rev. Sil- 
vio Barrette. A delegation was 
present from Waltham Lodge of 
Moose. Burial was in Calvary 
Cemetery, Waltham with prayers 
by Fr. Barrette. 

Mr Desorcy was in his 47th 
year He was the son of the late 
Louis and Victorine ( Aubi n) De- 
sorcy of Canada During World 
War II he served with a pursuit 
squadron of the Army Air 
Forces. 

He is survived by his sister, 
Mrs. Harold Boucrfer of Newton- 
ville and two aunts, Mrs. Joseph 
Frechette and Mrs. Philip Rous- 
seau of Newton. 

OLOF OHLSON 

— o — 

Olof Ohlson of 9 Central ave- 
nue, Newtonville, who for 44 
years was master designer at the 
Waltham Watch Company and 
also was the creator of time-fuse 
mechanisms used by the United 
States in both World War I and 
World War II, died at his homo 
on Monday, February 25. Ho was 
in his 82nd year. 

Mr. Ohlson was born in Gefle, 
Sweden where he learned the 
watch and clockmaker’s trade. He 
came to the United States in 
1888 and the following year be- 
came affiliated with the Waltham 
Watch Company, where ho re- 
mained until his retirement in 
1933. During that time he was 
credited with having developed 
all models or the timepieces and 
was considered the watch com- 
pany’s foremost technical de- 
signer. 

At the Panama Pacific Exhibi- 
tion in San Francisco in 1915 Mr. 
Ohlson vyas awarded a diploma 
and gold medal and in 1922 he 
won world-wide recognition when 
he was decorated by King Gus- 
tavus V. of Sweden with the 
Order of Vasa, the decoration be- 
ing conferred at Boston by Swe- 
den’s Royal vice-consul, in recog- 
nition of his engineering and sci- 
entific work. 

A large clock which was re- 
cently displayed in a window of 
the Grover Cronin clock store 
in Waltham in connection with 
the publiation of the book 
"Timing a Centure” was designed 
by Mr. Ohlson for the Crystal 
Palace at the London World’s 
Fair. 

He is credited with having con- 
tributed more to time-fuse perfec- 
tion than any other man in the 
world. Among patents issued to 
him were those for the coupling 
release, setting device and lock- 
ing device for time fuses, the 
time-fuse for artillery projectiles, 
a mechanical time fuse for projec- 
tiles and an improved setting 
lock. 

After retiring from the Wal- 
tham Watch Company, Mr. Ohl- 
son established the Ohlson Metal 
Products Company in Waltham. 
He retired completely from busi- 
ness about ten years ago. 

He was an honorary member 
of the Horological Institute of 
America, a member of the Ameri- 
can Societies of Chemical En- 
gineers, Swedish Engineers, 
Steel Treaters and Applied Phy- 
sics, the American Asociation for 
the Advancement of Science, and 
the John Ericksson Society. He 
was also a 32nd degree Mason, 
affiliated with Isaac Parker 
Lodge, A. F. and A. M., the Royal 
Arch Chapter of Waltham and 
Gethsemane Commandery of 
Newton, and was a member of 
Governor George Lodge, I. O. O. 
F. and Norumbega Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias of Waltham. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Eleanore ( Anderson) Ohlson, a 
sister, Mrs. Lars Olsson of Hede- 
sunda, Sweden, two nephews, 
Rev. George C. Ekwall of Wal- 
tham and Dr. T. Rolnd Ekwall 
of Northampton and a niece, 
Mrs. Thelma E. Beilis of Wal- 
Ihiam. 

Funeral services were held 
Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock 
in Christ Church, Waltham. 
Burial was in the Newton Ceme- 
tery. 


MARGARET A. MALONEY 

— o — 

Funeral services for Mrs. Mar- 
garet A. Maloney, widow of Mich- 
ael H. Maloney were held Satur- 
day morning from her home, 250 
River street, West Newton. A 
solemn requiem mass was cele- 
brated In St. Bernard's church 
by Rev. John J. Crane, S.T.L., pas- 
tor, assisted by Rev. George F. 
Mulcahy, deacon and Rev .John 
A. Saunders, sub deacon. A group 
of members of the Ladies’ Aux- 
liary, A.O.H., attended the serv- 
ices, also a representation from 
the Newton Police Department. 
Burial was in Calvary Cemetery, 
Waltham with prayers by Fr. 
Mulcahy. 

Mrs. Maloney, who was ln her 
87th year, died at home on Wed- 
nesday, February 20, following 
a short illness. She was born 
in West Newton, the daughter of 
Patrick and Mary (Fanning) 
Maloney. 

She is survived by one son, 
Francis X. Maloney, a member of 
the Newton Police Department, 
and two daughters, Miss Mary 
E. Maloney and Mrs. Rose I. Mc- 
Cann, all of West Newton. 

o 

HAZEL J. FEELEY 
— o — 

Funeral services for Mrs. Haz- 
el J. Feeley, widow of John A. 
Feeley, were held from her hom^. 
313 California street, Newton on 
Monday morning. A high mass 
of requiem was celebrated in the 
Church of Our Lady by Rev. 
Daniel J. Taglino. Burial was in 
Calvary Cemetery, Waltham with 
prayers by Fr. Taglino. 

Mrs. Feeley died at her home 
on Thursday, February 21. She 
was in her 61st year, and was 
born in Fitchburg. She had re- 
sided in Newton for 40 years. 

Surviving her are five daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Dorothy Doyle of Wat- 
ertown, Mrs. Mabel Nutter of 
Long Island, New York, Mrs. 
Rita Urbati of Hingham, Mrs. 
Hazel Deigh and Mrs. Esther 
Malgieri of Newtek, two sons. 
Charles F. and James Feeley of 
Newton and fourteen grandchil- 
dren. 

THERESA H. ERWIN 


THOMAS F. DALY 

— o — 

Funeral services for Thomas 
F. Daly of 62 Richardson street, 
Newton, were held from his home 
on Wednesday morning. A high 
mass of requiem was celebrated 
in the Church of Our Lady by 
Rev. Arthur I. Norton. A rep- 
resentation was present from 
Middlesex Court, M.C.O.F. of 
which the deceased was a mem- 
ber. Burial was In Calvary Ceme- 
tery, Waltham with prayers by 
Fr. Norton. 

Dr. Daly died on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 24. He was in his 84th 
year, and was born in Galway, 
Ireland, the son of Thomas and 
Mary iKillelea) Daley. He had 
been a resident of Newton for 
60 years, and was a member of 
Middlesex Court, M.C.O.F. 

Surviving him are four sons, 
Thomas F. Jr., of Roslindale, Ed- 
ward J. of Allston, Raymond G. 
of Waltham and Matthew M. 
Daly of Newton; lour daughters, 
Miss Mary E and Miss Alma 
Daly, Mrs. Timothy D. Herlihy 
of West Newton and Mrs. Charles 
B. Kelly of Newtonville, his sis- 
ter, Miss Teresa Daly of Milton, 
and three grandchildren. 


WILLIAM P. MORSE 

— o — 

Funeral services for Williarm 
P. Morse, retired Newton city 
engineer, were held in the Sec- 
ond Church in Newton, West 
Newton, Saturday afternoon at 
2 o’clock with Dr. R. Clyde Yar- 
brough officiating. Burial was 
in St. Mary's Cemetery, Newton 
Lower Falls. 

Mr. Morse died on Thursday, 
February 14 at East Bridgewat- 
er, Mass., where he had been re- 
siding since last October at the 
home of his niece, Mrs. Marion 
E. DeChambeau. He was in his 
83rd year and had been a resi- 
dent of Newton for many years, 
residing at 34 Fairfax street, 
West Newton. 

He was a member of tbe Am- 
erican and the Boston Society of 
Cicil Engineers and of the West 
Newton Men’s Club. 


Funeral services for Mrs. 
Theresa H. Erwin of 28 Norman- 
dy road, Auburndale, were held 
Wednesday morning from the 
Thomas J. Lyons Funeral Home, 
1497 Washington street, West 
Newton. A high mass of requiem 
was celebrated in St. Bernard’s 
Church by Rev. George F. Mul- 
cahy. 

Burial was ln St. Joseph’s 
Cemetery, West Roxbury, with 
prayers by Rev. Edward F. Des- 
mond of the Holy Name Church. 

Mrs. Erwin who was in her 
64th year, died at her home on 
Sunday. February 24. She was 
born in Boston, the daughter of 
Charles and Ann (Moran) Devlin. 

She is survived by two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Mary M. Carey of i 
Auburndale and Mrs. Ann T. ! 
Cowan of Jersey City, New Jer- j 
sey, a son, Edward A. Erwin of | 
Brockton, three sisters. Sister 
Ignatius Julie, S.N.D., of Holy Re- 
deemer Convent, East Boston, ! 
Mrs. J. Francis Driscoll of Brook- 1 
line and Miss Mary E. Devlin of 
Brookline. 


CATE 

Funeral Service 

Serving This Community 
Since 1861 

Tel. BIG. 0170 

1251 Washington St. 

West Newton 


ESTHER K. MEEKER 

Funeral services for Mrs. 
Esther K. Meeker, wife of 
Charles H. Meeker of 20 Adella 
avenue, West Newton, were held 
Saturday afternoon at 4 o’clock 
in the Newton Cemetery Chapel. 
Dr, R. Clyde Yarbrough officiat- 
ed. Burial was In the Newton 
Cemetery. 

Mrs. Meeker died at her home 
on Thursday, February 21. She 
was born in Middletown, Conn., 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Kient. 

She Is survived by her husband, 
and two sisters, Mrs. O. C. Gilles- 
pie of Schenectady, New York 
and Miss Alma Kient of New 
York City. 

Mr. Meeker Is past president 
of the Rotary Club, a past Dis- 
trict Governor of the 197th Dis- 
trict of Rotary, and a member of 
Dalhousie Lodge A.F. & A.M, He 
Is New England Representative 
ol the General Motors Corpora- 
tion. 


Distinctive Flower 
Arrangements for Funerals 
K. Q. MAGNUSON 

Florist 

2020 Commonwealth Avenue 
Auburndale - Tel. LA8 0215 


SAY If 

i vim 


Flowers 


Eastman's 

FLOWER SHOPS 

Newtonville - Wellesley Hills 
BIG. 6781 WEL. 2440 


MRS. GEORGE P. FLOOD 

PAUL R: FITZGERALD 

ftc*. Kmbalmrr 

JOHN 

FLOOD 

FUNERAL 

DIRECTOR 

Tel r.ASell OtRR 

90 Waahlnftoo St.. Newtoa 


DEATHS 


COOKE— On Fob. 28 at Newton, 
Etta I. Cooke, widow of Dr. E. 
Ward Cooke of 38 Eldredge 
street. 

DALY— On Feb. 24 at Newton, 
Thomas F. Daly, husband of 
the late Annie (Coffee) Daly, 
of 62 Richardson street. 

ERWIN - On Feb. 24 at Auburn- 
dale, Theresa H. (Devlin) Er- 
win, widow of Edward A. Er- 
win, of 28 Normandy road. 

FEELEY On Feb. 21 at Newton, 
Hazel J. (Dezotell) Feeley, 


widow of John A. Feeley, of 
313 California street. 

KNEELAND— On Feb. 23 at 
West Newton, Mary Elizabeth 
(Aldron) Kneeland, widow of 
Edwin S. Kneeland. 

LOFGREN— On Feb. 22 at West 
Newton, Carl E. Lofgren, hus- 
band of the late ililma M. 
(Horner) Lofgren, of 73 War- 
wick road. 

MacDONALD— On Feb. 26 at 
Newton Centre, Dr. James 
Stephen MacDonald, husband 
of the late Catherine (Mac- 
Kinnon) MacDonald and father 
of Mrs. John F. Gallagher of 
59 Commonwealth Park West. 

MORSE -On Feb. 21 at East 
Bridgewater, Mass., William 
Prentiss Morse, formerly of 
34 Fairfax .street, West New- 
ton. 

OHLSON— On Feb. 25 at Newton- 
ville, Olof Ohlson, husband of 
Eleanore (Anderson) Ohlson, 
of 9 Central avenue. 

O’NEILL —On Feb. 24 at Newton 
Upper Falls, Nicholas O’Neill, 
of 24 Summer street. 

RATH BUN On Feb. 25 at New- 
ton Highlands, Clara H. Ruth- 
bun, of 24 Mountford road. | 


Memorial services conducted by this organiza- 
tion are fitting and appropriate and costs are 
determined by family wishes. 

Rich ^X^Bellinger 

SUCCESSORS TO M. RICH 


_L 26-30 CENTRE AVE.-NEWTON.MASS. 



NonS uclurlan 


SINCE IH52 

Distinctive Service 

LOCAL .SUBURBAN . DISTANT 
Price Range For All 
Informution • Fslini'ntc. 

OFFICES S CHAPELS 
CKNTRA1XY LOCATED 




fo, J. S. WATIEIMAN t, 








THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1946. 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


PAGE SEVER 


Newtonville Man 400 Freshmen Enter B.C 
Officer on 
U.S.S. Huntington 


Ensign Douglass P. Toschnor, 
USNR, New viville, Mass,, is a 
division officer aboard the new 
10, 000-ton light cruiser USB Hun- 
tington which was commis- 
sioned on Saturday afternoon. 
February 23, at the Philadelphia 
Naval Base, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ensign Teschner was gradu- 
ated from the Abbott Hall Mid- 
shipmen's School and the Har- 
vard Communications School, 
Newport, R. I„ before he was as- 
signed to the Huntington. He 
has previously been stationed at 
Asbury Park, N. J„ and New- 
port, R. I. His parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward A. Teschner, live at 
37 Thaxter road, Newtonville, 
Mass. 

The USS Huntington, is one of 
the most modernly equipped 
warships to join the U. S. Fleet. 
The keel of the ship was laid on 
October 4, 1943 at. the New York 
Shipbuilding^ o r po r a 1 1 o n at 
Camden, New Jersey. She was 
launched on April 8, 1945. Her 
peace time crew consists of 50 
officers and 850 enlisted person- 
nel. 


Very Rev. William L. Keleher, 
S.J., president of Boston College, 
welcomed a class of 400 freshman 
who entered the college on Mon- 
day of this week. Three hundred 
members of this class entered 
the College of Arts and Science, 
the others enrolling in the Col- 
lege of Business Administration. 

Officials of the college esti- 
mate that by next week the re- 
turn of veterans to the upper 
graduate enrollment to the pre- 
war peak of 1600 students. 


CITY OF NEWTON 
Massachusetts 


The Planning Board Acting as 
the Board of Survey will give a 
public hearing at City Hall, New- 
ton Centre, Mass., on Thursday 
evening, March 7, 1946, at 6:45 
o'clock P.M., for the considera- 
tion of the following: 

Relocation of part of Botsford 
Road in Newton Centre, Mass., 
shown on a plan and profile of 
part of Botsford Road in New- 
ton, Mass., in property ol' Arnold 
Hartmann, 'by Rowland II. 
Barnes and Company, Civil En- 
gineers. 

WILLARD S. PRATT. 
Clerk of the Planning Board 
Acting as the Board of Survey. 

Advertisement 
February 28. 1946 


R hoz Aick 

Budgets 

mrh 


The best prescription for 
the home buying budget 
is to get a modern home 
loan. It's economical as 
well as convenient. It’s 
as easy as paying rent. 
We have money to loan 
on local property. 



NEWTON CENTRE 
SAVINGS BANK 

105 UNION ST. • NEWTON CENTRE* 


Snow Elected to 
Boston Life 
Underwriters Assoc. 

— o — 

Robert .1. Snow of 32 Co- 
chltuate road, Newton Highlands, 
was elected to membership in The 
Boston Life Underwriters As- ^ 
sbeiation at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors February 5, 
according to an announcement by 
William H. Daley, Jr., President 
of the Association. 

Numbering over 900 members, 
the Boston Lifd Underwriters As- 
sociation is the oldest organiza- 
tion of its kind in the country — a 
trade association of life insurance 
agents and officials who strive 
to advance true life insurance and 
to bring those engaged in the 
business into more intimate and 
friendly relations with one an- 
other. 

The next meeting of the As- 
sociation will be a luncheon, 
Thursday, February 28th, 12:15, 
Hotel Slatler, Boston. The guest 
speaker will be Timothy W. 
Foley, General Agent of the State 
Mutual Life Assurance Company 
in New York City, who will talk 
on, "Merchandising Life Insur- 
ance Through the Use of Visual 
Sales Aids." 


COM MOWVT.AT.TII OF 
M \SMACIM SKTTS 

Middlesex. .«s. PltOMATK COURT 

To it II personn Intcrented in the 
estate of 

Charles K. A. Prrk 

late of Newton In an id County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition ha;* been presented to 
? aid Court for probate of a rertaln 
Instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said dereased by (Sertrude B. 

' 1‘eck of Newton In salt! County, pray- 
I Iiik that she be appointed executrix 
thereof, without Riving a surety on 
her bond. 

If von desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should (lie a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge b<-for« ten o'clock In the Core- 
noon on tlie eighteenth day of March 
1 •• l the return day of this citation. 

Witness, John C l.eggat. Kscpdre, 
l-’lrst Judge of said Court, this twon- 
iv-tldrd day or February In the year 
one thousand nine hundred and forty- 
six. 

T.ORTXG P. JORDAN. 

(Si) f2S-ni7-H Register. 


AWNINGS 


NEW or RE-COVERED 

IT# have a large selection of pre-tvar colon at present 

Order now and pay after Installation In spring 

SHADES VENETIAN BLINDS 

WEDDING CANOPIES WEATHERSTRIPPING 

HOME SPECIALTIES COMPANY 

NEWTON CENTRE BIBolow 3900 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
M VSS At 'll!' SETTS 

Middlesex, ss. IMtOBATU COURT 

To all persons Interested In the 
petition hereinafter described. 

A petition lias been presented to 
said Court by 

Nn/xarluo Olovanno C nil lit*, 
minor, by Daniel Gent lie. his father 
and next friend, of Newton In said 
County, praying that Ills name may 
be changed ns follows: 

N.izxut-lno tJInvanno Gentile to 
Ned John Gentile 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or voiir attorney should file n written 
I appl-aram-e in sal I Court at I'ani- 
I bridge before ten o'cjoolc in the fore- 
noon on the fifteenth day of March 
I l!Hii. the return day of this citation. 

| Witness, .F<tli n ,C. Ivoggat, Ksquire, 
I First Judge of said Court, this twen- 
: t lot li day of February In the year one 
thousand nine hundred and fortv-slx. 

I.QRING P. JORDAN. 

(NT f28-t»7-1 1 . Register. 


TIRE RATIONING ENDS 


No more certificateal Once again every 
one 1* eligible to buy, and eoon you'll 


be able to drive in and get immediate 
delivery on new tires 1 or your car. 


PRODUCTION OUTLOOK AT 
A GLANCE 


Tire manufacturers have bsen unabl# to fill the great 
need lor new passenger car tires. In case we do not 
bar* tho right six* tire for your car, we should be able 
to get it soon. Come In for lull information. 


HERE’S WHY yea’ll want the 
B.F.Geodrieh Silvertowi 

OUTWEARS 

PREWAR 

TIRES! 


It ha. b..n proved. More th«u 2,000 Iwu »nd 
nearly 17,000,000 miles of the toughest kind of 
road service showed that this new B. F. Goodrich 
Silvertown will Outwear Prewar natural rubber 
Tires. 

Naw, better rubber, fi. F. Goodrich h„ d.- 
▼eloped a rubber that's fsr better than ordinary 
synthetics. It helps the new Silvertown wear better 
and run cooler. It has greater resistance to cracking 
— and actually stands bruising and damage from 
accidents better. 

Tire body 35% .trooper . a. mdrely ntw, 
stronger cord is used, more of these cords are used 
in the top ply, m extra shock-absorbing breaker strip 



is included. The result: a body that is 35 % stronger 
fur additional resistance to bruises, extra blowout 
protection. 

Flatter tread covers more ground. Called 
the "road level’’ tread, it puts more rubber on the 
road, permits all the tread to share the wear. Result: 
a further increase in mileage, less scuffing, better 
distribution of weight, better traction, more ssfen 
on the turns. 

Plus 3 years’ EXTRA experience. Three year 
before any other manufacturer, B. F. Goodrich solu 
tires containing synthetic rubber to American car 
owners. The extra know-how piled up in these years 
is reflected in the new B. F. Goodrich Silvertown. 


EXTRA MILEAGE TIRE RECAPPING 

6.00-16 . . . $7.00 

WE LOAN YOU TIRES WHILE YOURS ARE 
BEING RECAPPED 

Service Charge - $1.00 each 

B RAM’S 

Battery and Tire Service 

252 Walnut Street Newtonville 

Call LASell 0835 

Ww "Drttct mid ColUct " ntry Tburulsj on ABC * 9l30 p. m. ES.T. 


BFGoodrich 

TIRES 


Reception to 
Archbishop Cushing 

— o — 

Sa I nt Ignatius’ Parish, Chest* 
nut Hill, will hold a Reception to 
His Excellency, Most Reverend 
Richard J. Cushing, Archbishop 
of Boston, in the Grand Ball 
Room of the Copley Plaza Hotel, 
Boston, Thursday evening, Feb- 
ruary 28, 1946 at 8 o’clock. 

An attractive program has 
been arranged under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. James J. Byrnes, 
Chairman for the occasion. 

His Excellency, Most Reverend 
Richard J. Cushing, will address 
the gathering 1 and will meet the 
parishioners in an informal Re- 
union, 

The year 1946 marks the 
twentieth anniversary of the 
founding of Saint Ignatius' 
Parish, and the priests and par- 
ishioners are looking forward to 
a gala occasion. 

The members of the Clover 
Club of Boston will present their 
version of "The late George 
Apley,” early in the evening. The 
Clover Glee Club will sing their 
favorite numbers. 

There will be dancing to the 
music of Ruby Newman's Orches- 
tra under the personal direction 
of Sammy Eisen. 

Attractive prizes have been ar- 
ranged for those who wish to play 
bridge. 

All the members of the parish 
have been invited to serve on the 
Reception Committee and the ad- 
vanced sale of tickets points to a 
capacity gathering for the Recep- 
tion. 

Newton Centre Man Named 
A Director of Stop & Shop, 
Economy Stores 

— O — 

Lloyd D. Tarlin, assistant 
treasurer of Stop & Shop Super 
markets and Economy Grocery 
Stores, Boston, has been made a 
director of the company, it was 
announced today by Sidney R. 
Rabb, chairman of the board. Mr. 
Tarlin’s election fills the vacancy 
caused by the death of Vincent 
J. Vollono. 

A graduate of Harvard Uni- 
versity and the Harvard Gradu- 
ate School of Business Adminis- 
tration, Mr. Tarlin came to the 
company in 1929, after a year 
and a half with Sears, Ropbuck 
& Co. For the past 11 years he 
has held the position of assist- 
ant treasurer at Stop & Shop. 

Mr. Tarlin resides at 28 Laud- 
holm road in Newton Centre. 

Fill your mind with whole- * 
some thoughts and you will 
avoid using empty words. 


Easter Seals - 

(Continued from Pa qe J) 

habilitation of crippled and hand- 
icapped children and adults re- 
gardless of race, creed, or color. 
More than 108,000 buyers of these 
ten million seals gave their sup- 
port to the Bay State' Society 
and the goal this year is for the 
sale of more than eighty million 
seals. State headquarters are at 
340 Main street in Worcester. 

Archbishop Richard J. Cushing 
has consented to serve as a mem- 
ber of the Easter Seal committee 
as have also representatives or 
leaders of all the other religious 
faiths. Both Governor Maurice J. 
Tobin and Lieutenant Governor 
Robert F. Bradford are also mem- 
bers of the committee and the 
Governor has issued a radio ap* 
peal to all citizens of the Bay 
State to support this worthy or- 
ganization in its even more 
worthy purpose of caring for un- 
met needs of the crippled and 
handicapped throughout the 
Commonwealth. 

The Tub Thumpers of America, 
whose membership is that of 
leading publicists and newspaper 
men and women, are to aid in the 
sale of the Easter Seals as they 
have in many other worthy com- 
paigns. Harry Browning, Chief 
Tub Thumper has given his en- 
dorsement to the Bay State So- 
ciety. 

Specific cases are being 
handled in such a way as to in- 
sure a new and better mode of 
life to the crippled and handicap 
ped. 


Case No. 19479 Reg. 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 

To Louise E. Berke, of New- 
ton. in the County of Middlesex 
and said Commonwealth; Metro- 
politan Ice Company, a duly ex- 
isting corporation having an 
usual place of business in Som- 
erville, in said County of Mid- 
dlesex; Boston & Albany Rail- 
road Company, a duly existing 
corporation having an usual 
place of business in Boston, in 
the County of Suffolk and said 
Commonwealth: and to all whom 
it may concern: 

Whereas, a petition has been 
presented to said Court by the 
Purity-Crystal Ice Company, a 
duly existing corporation having 
an usu.il place of business in said 
Boston, to register and confirm 
its title in the following described 
land: 

A certain parcel of land with 
the buildings thereon, situate in 
said Newton, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

Northeasterly and Northerly 
by Norwood Avenue: Northeast 
erly by the junction of said Nor- 
wood Avenue and Centre Street; 
Easterly by said Centre Street; 
Southeasterly by land now or 
formerly of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad Company; Westerly by 
the shore of Crystal Lake; and 
Northwesterly by land now or 
formerly of Louise E. Berke. 

Petitioner admits that the 
above-described ’-'ml is subject 
to a lease and purchase agree- 
ment. dated April 23. 1931, be- 
tween petitioner and Metropol- 
itan Ice Company, notice of 
which is duly recorded In Book 
5824, Page 529. 

The above-described land la 
shown on a plan filed with said 
petition and all boundary lines 
are claimed to be located on the 
ground as shown on said plan. 

If you desire to make any ob- 
jection or defense to said peti- 
tion you or your attorney must 
file a written appearance and an 
answer under oath, setting forth 
clearly and specifically your ob 
jections or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 
the Recorder of said Court in 
Boston (at the Court House), on 
or before the twenty-fifth day of 
March next’. 

Unless an appearance is so 
filed by or for you, your default 
will be recorded, the said peti- 
tion will be taken us confessed 
and you will be forever barred 
from contesting said petition or j 
any decree entered thereon. 

Witness, JOHN E. FENTON, ; 
Esquire, Judge of said Court, 
this twenty-sixth day of Febru 
ary in the year nineteen hundred 
and forty-six. 

Attest with S. \\ of said Court. 
ROBERT E. FRENCH, 
(Seali Recorder. 

Laurence F Davis, Esq., 23 
Central Avenue, Lynn, Mass, 
For the Petitioner. 

INI UfttuMi 1 


WC0P Notes 

— o — 

Two Newton Men Heard 
On "Put and Take" Quiz 

— O — 

Frederick Knight. 20 Meadow- 
brook road. Newton, and Harlan 
Riker. 68 Hyde street, Newton, 
were both heard on last Sun- 
day’s broadcast of the “Put and 
Take” quiz over station WCOP. 
The quiz program is aired week- 
ly at 2:30 p.m. 

The February 17th program 
was a contest between the ice 
cream division of H. P. Hood & 
Sons and Hood’s milk division. 
Mr. Knight, ice cream sales sup- 
erintendent, and Mr. Riker, ice 
cream salesman, were members 
of the milk division's quiz team. 

Interviewed on Radio 

— o — 

Mrs. Malcolm Green of New- 
ton Highlands, who is chairman 
of education of the Boston City 
Federation of Organization, was 
the interview guest of Virginia 
Dwyer on the WCOP program 
"People You Should Know” on 
Thursday, February 21st. 


Missing Airman Now 
Listed as Deceased 

LL Gerald M. Sullivan, Jr., 
U. S. N. R., son of Major Gerald 
M. Sullivan, U. S. A., In Tokyo, 
arid Mrs. G. Madeline Sullivan 
of 1980 Commonwealth avenue, 
Brighton, who was reported mis- 
sing on January 12, 1945. has 
now been officially listed as de- 
ceased by the Navy Department, 

Lt. Sullivan served in Fighting 
.Squadron 7 on the aircraft, car- 
rier Hancock, For "his daring 
tactics and cool courage under 
fire" in the Battle f6r Leyte Gulf 
on October 26. 1944, he was 
awarded the D. F. C. As a Hell- 
cat Fighter pilot, he fought all 
through the four months of the 
intense battering that culminat- 
ed in the liberation of the Phil- 
ippines. On January 12, 1945, 
Lt. Sullivan returned safely to 
the carrier from a bombing raid 
on a Jap-held harbor in the Cam- 
ranh Bay off French-Indo China, 
during which his wing plane had 
been shot down. He organized 
a three plane search for his broth- 
er flier and led the way back in- 
to the fire of the shore guns. 1 
Swinging his guns on the shore. \ 
Lt. Sullivan raked the enemy with 
light bombs and rockets. He 
silenced many of the ground 
guns and held the fire of the re- 
mainder on his single plane, in 
order that a more thorough 
search might be made. While the 
planes of his fellow fliers were 
in a cloud formation. Lt. Sulli- 
van's plane disappeared. 

For this deliberate act of sac- 
rifice, he has been awarded post- 
humously the Gold Star, signi- 
fying the award for the second 
time of the D. F. C. 

Lt. Sullivan was graduated 
from Newton High School in 
1936 and from Dartmouth Col- 
lege in 1940. At Dartmouth, he 
was a member of the Sigma Chi 
Fraternity and advertising man- 
ager of “The Dartmouth." He en- 
tered the sen-ice in 1940. His 
wife. Pattie C. Sullivan, lives in 
Detroit, Michigan and his sister. 
Mary Ann Sullivan, is a Rt-d 
Cross recreational worker at 
Fort Devens. 


Opportunity For 
Former Officers 
In Army Enlistment 

— o — 

BOSTON, January 16, 1946 — 
Former commissioned, warrant, 
and flight officers who had been 
released from military service be- 
tween the period of May 12, 1945 
and November 1, 1945, will now 
be given th** opportunity to enlist 
in the Regular Army in the grade 
of Master Sergeant according to 
an announcement by Col. Charles 
L. Stephenson. Director of Mili- 
tary Personnel Procurement 
Service for the First Service Com- 
mand. 

Prior to this change in policy, 
Colonel Stephenson said that of- 
ficers had to enlist in the Regular 
Army within twenty days of their 
last day of terminal leave in 
order to be sworn into the grade 
of Master Sergeant. This oppor- 
tunity for officers who are now 
veterans will be available until 
January 31. 1946. This in no way 
affects officers who have been 
discharged since November 1. 
1945 up-to-now, as these men will 
have to enlist within twenty days 
aftpr their last day of terminal 
leave in order to enlist in the 
grade of Master Sergeant. Offic- 
ers who are released after the 
31st of January will still have the 
twenty-day leeway. Colonel Ste- 
phenson added that further de- 
tailed information may be re- 
ceived from the U. S. Army Re- 
cruiting Station, 1601 Hancock 
street, Room 11. Quincy. Mass. 


’Pilate's Daughter' 
Opens 44 th Season 
Thursday, March 7 

Opening March 7, "Pilate’s 
Daughter," the nation's oldest 
Miracle Play, enters Its 44th con- 
secutive Lenten Season nt 
Pilate's Daughter Hall on Mis 
sion Hill, with three performances 
weekly until April 17— Thursdays 
at 8 15 p.m., Saturdays and Sun- 
days at 2 30 p m. In the Cast 
of seventy-six are: Lorraine 
Lewis, Mary Fedelma Aylward, 
Eugenia Richards. Virginia Bren- 
nen. Eunice Murphy and others. 
Very Reverend John M. Frawley, 
C.SS.R.. Rector of the Mission 
Church is Director of the produc- 
tion. Reverend Joseph G. Dalj% 
C.SS.R., is the Associate Direc- 
tor. Charlotte A. Rowe is Dram- 
atic Director. Gertrude T. Do- 
lan is Dance Director. 


commonwealth or 

...... M AS> veil I **FTTS 

Middlesex, *.*. PKOBATK COURT 
To nil person* Interested .n tl.e 
estate of 

Carl Margolin 

otherwise _ known a.- Karl Mar* , 
of .New.,;: } n said Conn:', *•- 
ceased. 

i A petition has been presented to 
vjid court praying that Benjamin 
M.irg..|iii_ of Cambridge n -aid •'..umv, 
'*'■ appointed administrator of said 
••'date, without giving a surety on hi- 
bond. 

If >*ou desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should rtl* a written 

brid^ ir; * nC * ln * h!( ' ‘ ,<>urt at r ' am - 


'ourt 

in the fore- 
th das Mar. h 


Birthday Greetings 

— O — 

Two Newton birthdays were 
saluted by Hum and Strum on 
their WCOP program. "Commut- 
er’s Special," last week. On Feb- 
ruary 13th, they greeted six year 
old Joyce Carol Mullc-n of 89 
Fuller street, West Newton: anil 
on February 14th, greeted five 
year old Lois Aronson, 60 
Kenilworth street, Newton. 


before ten 
J 'l t; .,n the eight 

1: 'hj. the return 

John '' Leggat. Bsquit 

Fn-t Judge of srUd Court, th,.- twei 
tieth day . »f Kebruar,- ;» :he vear oi 
thousand nine hundred and fortv-Mx 
LORI.Vti P. JORDAN. 

(X ) f 2 S-m 7 -: 1 Register. 

(lit or VKWToN 
Massachusetts 

.Notice uf Application for Transfer of 
l.loe die from Inditldiiui to a Part- 
nertlilp for Hejlaurani Wine 
and Malt ti-l)ay 1 (rente 


Vets of 101st 
Infantry Plan 
Reunion Dinner 


A large committee has been 
busy for the past few weeks com- 
pleting arrangement for the re- 
union and ertnner of World War 
II members of the 101st Infantry, 
26th Division. This affair will be 
conducted March 17 in the main 
ballroom, Bradford Hotel. 

All veterans who were mem- 
bers of the regiment at any time 
subsequent to January 16. 1941 
are invited to attend this dinner. 

Reservations may be made at 
the YD Club. 200 Huntington ave- 
nue. Boston with any member of 
the committee, which includes: 
Timothy C. Doherty, general 
chairman: Earl S. Eaves, treasur- 
er: Richard P. Sullivan, ticket 
committee: Albert E. McWade. 
entertainment committee, and 
Wililam 'Buddy Coughlin, pub- 
licity committee. 


CITY OF NEWTON 
Massachusetts 

The Planning Board Acting as 
the Board of Survey will give a 
public hearing at City Hall. New- 
ton Centre. Mass., on Thursday 
evening. March 7, 1946, at 6:45 
o’clock P.M,, for the considera- 
tion of the following: 

Hatfield Road extension ln 
West Newton, Mass., shown on 
plan and profile of Hatfield Road. 
West Newton. Mass.. Everett M. 
Brooks, Civil Engineer, dated 
January. 1946. 

WILLARD 3 PRATT. 
Clerk of the Planning Board 
Acting as the Board of Survey. 

Advertisement 

February 2*. 1$4« 

CITY OF NEWTON 
.Massachusetts 

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 


CITY OF NEWTON 


Chaptei 


Pursuant to Central Law 
J - 1 Section 15a. notice . 3 u « m- 
b’.vcn that Antonio Magnl giving 
n •t.Lf of transfer of wine and malt 
six-day restaurant ;. t.> R.lwrt 

*- ■ FI*. yd and D.uiie. B Magnl. s.rd 
u. y.l lnnic .it 1 ‘ .\ wtesbank Road. 
• 

Hawthorne Ftjvrt. X-.vton. STo:e lo- 
cated *t HJ Adame Street. Newton 
consisting .-,r flr>t tb ■ re*: a ura:,: a.,d 
br . k buslne-s 



Cast? No. 19664 Reg. 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 

To Michael J. Conroy, Mary A. 
Conroy. Susie Kierstead Berry, 
and Jacob Rubin, of Newton, in 
the County of Middlesex and said 
Commonwealth: and to all whom 
it may concern: 

Whereas, a petition has been 
presented to said Court *by Greg- 
ory Panjian, of Waltham, in said 
! County of Middlesex, to register 
and confirm his title in the fol- 
; lowing described land: 

A certain parcel of land witlj , 
the buildings thereon, situate in 
j said Newton, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

Southerly by Washington 
Street 159.23 feet; Southwesterly 
by the junction of said Wash- 
ington Street and Walker Street 
29.61 feet; Westerly by said 
Walker Street 55.90 feet: North- 
erly by land now or formerly of 
Michael J. Conroy et al 1S2.12 
feet; and Easterly by land now 
or formerly of Susie Kierstead 
Berry 73 feet. 

The above-described land is 
shown on a plan tiled with said 
petition and all boundary lines 
are claimed to be located on the 
ground as shown on said plan. 

If you desire to make any ob- 
jection or defense to said peti- 
tion yoij or your attorney must 
file a written appearance and an 1 
answer under oath, setting forth 
clearly and specifically your ob 
jections or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 
the Recorder of said Court in 
Boston (at the Court House), on 
or before the twenty-fifth day of 
March next. 

Unless an appearance is so 
filed by or for you. your default 
Will be recorded, the said petl 
tiou will be taken as confessed 
and you will be forever barred 
from contesting said petition or 
any decree entered thereon. 

Witness. JOHN E. KENTON. 
Esquire, Judge of said Court, 
tiffs twenty-first day of Febru 
ary in the year nineteen hundred 
and forty-six. 

Attest with seal of said Cour» 
ROBERT E. FRENCH. 
(Seal) Recorder. 

Pitillip Pinkney. Esq . t Court 
Street, Boston, Mass, For the 
Petitioner. 


- ~ one-* 

ljulUlIng, l from 
wntrance. 

t 

Advertisement 
February 2>, ISut 

( OMMOX WEALTH ~OK 
M \ss \« || | sk | i s 

j Middle**-*, — . PROBATE COURT 

To ail jivrsnns ii.NMv*n*t| ln th*- 


A P.D OF LICENSE 
iViMMISSh.N FR.S. 


tat. 


dr- 


A petition ha* been presented to 
(Mid < iiitn for i>,'wl<atc uf a cc.taln 
Instrument purp.vt ti* -o be :he last 
" ut -.lid dr, r .. s*d t Ruth B. 
Xf' • :• In *.i:d 


I ! 


on h«*r boiui 
If you dr 


In-f.ir 
i IMt. 


•ted 


“Hid die a written 
Court at Cam* 
, ' . k In the fore- 


John C. Eaqulr 

- of i Oourt. this l«rl 
day .f February in th 
ho ml iiiv.r hundred a:: 

LOR I NO P. JORDAN 


DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS 
AN1) MEASURES 
NOTICE 

In compliance with the provi- 
sions of Section 41. Chapter 98 
of the General Laws o; Massa- 
chusetts, as amended by Chapter 
32, Acts of 19^23. I hereby give 
notice to all inhabitants or per- 
sons having usual places of 
business in Newton using weigh- 
ing or measuring devices for the 
purpose of buying or selling 
goods, wares or merchandise, for 
public weighing or for hire or 
reward, to bring in such weign- 
ing and measuring devices to be 
tested, adjusted and sealed. I 
shall be at the office of Sealer 
of Weights and Measures daily 
i Sundays and holidays excluded 
until March 31. 1946, inclusive, 
to attend to this duty. 

ANDREW PRIOR. 
Sealer of Weights and 
Measures for Newton. 
Office, City Hall. 

Office Hours. 9 to 10:30. 

February lt. _S 


Sealed proposals for construct- 
ing new and repairing old cement 
concrete curbing, walks. s*eps 
and driveways In the City of 
Newton, during the year 1946. 
will be received at the office of 
the Street Commissioner. City- 
Hall. 1000 Commonwealth Ave.. 
Newton Centre. Mass . until 10-30 
A.M.. March 14th. 1946. at which 
place and time they will be pub- 
licly- opened and read. 

All proposals must be sealed 
proposals, made in duplicate 
upon blank forms furnished by- 
said Commissioner, one proposal 
to be deposited with the Com- 
missioner must be accompanied 
by a certified check upon a na- 
tional bank or'-*rust company in 
the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts for the sum of Two 
Thousand Dollars payable to and 
to become the property of the 
City of Newton if the proposal 
is accepted and the bidder ne- 
glects or refuses to comply with 
the terms of the proposal. One 
proposal (without check i. must 
be filed by the bidder in the of- 
fice of the Comptroller of Ac- 
counts of Newton, prior to the 
time set for opening bids. iSee 
Ordinances of the City of New- 
ton Chapter 2 Section 21. as 
amended 

A sufficient bond for the faith- 
ful performance of the contract 
in the penal sum of the contract 
price will be required. 

Specifications and terms of 
contract can be obtained at the 
office of said Commissioner. 

Attention is called to the fact 
that minimum wage rates for 
this project are established in ac- 
cordance with Chapter 461. Acts 
of 1935. and are set forth in the 
contract documents. Copy of 
said rate schedule may be ob- 
tained without cost upon applica- 
tion. 

The Commissioner reserves 
the right to reject either, any-, or 
all proposals, or to accept any 
proposal or any part of any pro- 
posal and to award the contract 
as he may deem to be for the 
best interests of the City- of New- 
ton. 

Harold F. Young. 

Street Commissioner. 

Fvb JS. 1*4 S 


Another Wartime Restriction Lifted! 


PASSBOOK VERIFICATION RESUMED 

The war Interrupted the practice of 

VERIFYING DEPOSITORS' PASSBOOKS 

New the restriction is lifted and we are permitted, 
and required by law, to request our depositors to brinq 
or send in their passbooks to be vended by our 
official verifier specially employed for that purpose. 
This privilege will be open to you 

UNTIL MARCH IB, 1946 

and we urge prompt action. 


NEWTON 



Sfll’iMtJS tfrutk 


KSi Washington fti'««l at Mamton Oornar 

Resources now ovsr $27,500,000 



PACE EIGHT 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1946 


OX T1IE IXSIDE 

b; MARVIN R. GOll.n 


Upper Falls 


— o — 

Rev. A. K. Fillmore, pastor of 
the Second Rapt 1st Church will 
preside at the service of Holy 
Communion at 10:30 a. m., on 
Sunday. He will speak on Com- 
munion Meditations. 

— o — 

The Deacon's of the Second 
Baptist Church will have charge 
of the Church Prayer Service on 
Friday, March 1, at 7:30 p. m. 

— o — 

The World Day of Prayer wi 


, from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. Mom- 
1 bers will bring a box lunch and 
hot drinks will be served. 

— o — 

Rev. W. H. Shillington, pastor 
of the First Methodist Church, 

1 will preach Sunday at 10.45 a. 
m., from the topic “God’s 
Judgments,” followed by the 
Service of Holy Comunion. 


By MARVIN R. GOULD 

This week's man of the week is none other than Newton High 
School’s own Hockey Captain, Tony Esposito. Tony was the only 
Newton player picked for the first team of the Greater Boston 
AH Stars, who played the Montreal Canadian^ on Washington's 

Birthday. Tony was born in Newton December 13, 1927. At the observed by a service at the 
age of 5 he began school at the Bowen School. He started his . Newton Centre Methodist Church 
athletic career at Weeks Junior High School where he played foot- on Friday. March 8 at 2:30 p. m., 
ball, basketball' and baseball* While at Weeks Tony was the high members of the Women’s 

scorer in basketball. Almost as soon as Tony entered N.H.S. he Societies of Christian Service, 
became a member of the Varsity Hockey Squad and now Tony is Tho g Uegt S p ea k or w ju be Mrs. 
captain of the team. He also was a member of the football squad Lesl|e E S wain, president of the 
in his Junior and Senior year. Tony is one of the most popular j^ or tbern 
and most liked boys in the Senior class as is shown by the various 
school and Newton Student Canteen offices he holds. Anthony is 
a member ot the Legislature, Lunchroom Board of Review, Execu- 
tive Committee at the Canteen, and he is Captain of the Lunch- 
room Squad on Mondays. He tells us that his favorite pastimes 
are Football, girls, Hockey, girls, Basketball, girls. Baseball, girls, 
and guzzling cokes. Oh yes, he also likes girls. When asked of his 
future he said, "After I graduate I hope to go to college if 'Uncle 
Sam' doesn't get me first. I hope that I may sometime become a 
football and hockey coach.” Best of luck, Tony, and I know that 
you will soon see your ambition fulfilled the same as everyone 
that knows you knows that you will make good. 

Chet Wiley, who expects to go overseas some time in the near 
future tells us that Johnny Rccco now in the U. S. Army has 
opened another Recco’s Market somewhere in Germany . . . Bill 

Gould, last year's track captain, was home on leave from the U. S. j — « — 

Navy in Norfolk, Virginia . . Phil Bolster, former track and The Red Cross Sewing Group 
football star, is headed for a cruise to South America at the ex- j frill meet in the Parish Hall of 
pense of the United States Merchant Marine . . . Dave Crafts, J the First Methodist Church on 
hockey ace of one year ago tells this reporter that he thinks that i Wednesday, from 10 a. m. to 4 
he is caught in a draft. (Chilly, isn’t it.) j p. m. 

We are glad to see Patrolman Ray Taffe of tfie Newton Police 
Department back on duty in Newton Centre square again. It is the 
sincere hope of this reporter, and all your friends, Ray, that you 
soon can forget about such things as a sacro-iliac back . . . Speak- 
ing of officers of the law, Joe Charleton is back on duty in the 
Ward street section again. 

Your reporter has recently been informed by Mr. Walter H. 

Sears of the Highland Glee Club that at their next concert they 
will have the famed pianist, who was furthered in his career by 
their scholarship, Allan Booth, graduate of N.H.S., class ’of 1942. 

While at N.H.S. Allan was a member of the Glee Club and took 

part in .several school productions Tickets for this excellent pro- , (alk upQn „ Growing Bulbs 

duction are on sale to N.H.S. students and their paients at the , hoil . ril1 , 11rn 
High School by Mr. Frederick O. Holmes who is an active singing 
member of the Highland Glee Club. (Sounds good.) - 

For sometime now many students have been griping to me 
about certain things tha have been going on around Newon. They 
have asked me to print these gripes. I shall print these gripes 
on one condition and that condition is only if they write me a 
(Signed letter. I shall quote from these letters without adding my 
personal comments from time to time. Those who have- been using 
their "hammers" may now use them in this column provided that 
they have facts to back up these gripes. Even if I disagree with 
these gripes, I shall stake my reputation so that these gripes may 
be heard. 


Mass. Club of Fort 
Lauderdale Banquets 
On 1st Anniversary 

— o — 

On Monday evening. Feb. 18, 
the Massachusetts Club of Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla., held Its First 
Anniversary Banquet at the 
Broward Hotel. The President, 
Chester T. Holbrook, well known 
Photographer and Yachtsman 
from Newton Centre, presided. 
The meeting was opened with the 
singing of God Bless America by 
the gathering. Prayer was offer- 
ed by Mrs. Florence Creighton 
of Quincy. A turkey dinner was 
enjoyed. A largo birthday cake 
was made by Mrs. William C. 
Ross, Vice-President of the Club. 
Mrs. Ross is from Chestnut Hill, 
and is a prominent Club Woman. 


Hutchinson of Raynham and 
Mrs. Chester B. Chapman of Win- 
throp; Chairman of the Publicity 
Committee, Mr. Robert T. Fowler 
of West Roxbury; assistants, 
Miss Caroline Porter of Salem, 
Miss Connie Wheeler of Newton 
Highlands, Mrs. Frank Richard- 
son of Waltham, and Mrs. Roger 
Hadley of Winchester. 

A splendid entertainment was 
enjoyed, consisting of some in- 
teresting and puzzling tricks by 
Donald Brown, magician. The 
musical part of the program was 
furnished by one of our best 
known Bostonians, Miss Marjorie 
Posselt, concert violinist. To Miss 
Possclt it was a real "Old Home 
Week" as more than half the au- 
dience remembered her as a pion- 
eer radio personality on WEEI 
Boston, as "Marge” of the Friend- 
ly Maids and Neapolitan Dutch 


Baptist Convention. 

— | The cake was beautifully decorat- , Girls. After an enthusiastic wel- 

The Woman’s Society of Chris- ed in yellow and green with one come Miss Posselt was happy to 
tian Service will meet for an all green candle, during the lighting relinquish her place in the spot- 
day meeting on Thursdav, March of the candle every one joined in light to her little accompanist, 


singing Happy Birthday. seven years old Gloria Longwood, 

Special guests were introduced her niece and pupil. Gloria, a 
by Mr. Holbrook: Mr. Louis Per- third grade student at the Pine 


Pres. Ell of N. U. 
Speaks at Newton 
Methodist Church 


NEWTON, Feb. 24 — "Despite 
the greed and selfishness of self 
centered pressure groups, de- 
spite the racketeer, deceiver and 
betrayer of public trust and re- 
gardless of the inhumanity of 
man to man, I firmly believe 
with Horace Mann in the im- 
provability of the race,” de- 
clared Pres. Carl S. Ell of North- 
eastern University in the morn- 
ing service on Sunday at the 
Newton Methodist Church, Cen- 
tre and Wesley streets. 

Talking on the subject "The 
Living FaTth,” Pres. Ell asserted 
that "we are apt to lose our per- 
spective when we look about us 
today and see political intrigue 
and the discouraging problems 
of peace. We are apt to feel 
utterly helpless and discouraged 
when we see racial and religious 
intolerance, the brazen betrayer 


Newton Centre 


Newtonville 


Fifty-two members of the Elliot 
Hill Improvement Asociation met j 
in the School Hall of the Ralph | 

Waldo Emerson School on Fri- L-w, 

, . oc . o mi Committee: 

day, January 25 at 8 p. m. The 

president, Mr. Herbert C. Jones, 
of 15 Roundwood road, presided 
at a short business meeting. Mr. 

John Russell of Dedham, the 
guest speaker, gave an Ulus- 


and their Culture.” 

— o — 

Miss Alice Jones of Linden 
street, has recovered from a 
month’s illness. 

— o — 

Charles Thomas, Jr., and sister 
Barbara Thomas of Southville, 
were visiting their grandparents 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Evans of 
Thurston road, this past week. 


The Senior Youth Group will 
meet in the Chapel of the First 
Methodist Church on Sunday, 
March 3, at 5.45 p. m. Speaker, 


Mrs. John W. Bixel left for her — o— 

home in Tacoma, Wash., Mon- S-Sgt. Jack D. Langlois form- Rev. W. Henry Shillington. 
day. after a three months’ stay erly of Dexter road, Newtonville, 
visiting her sister, Mrs. Willis B. has just returned from 19 months j 
Clough of 132 Pleasant street, in the Pacific. He has been on 
' radar ship off Saipan and Iwo 
Jima. 


Newton Centre, and other sisters, 
Miss Eunice Jones of 16 Exeter 
street and Miss Irene Jones of 
Exeter, N. H. Mrs. Bixel is the 
willow of the well-known voice 
teacher, Mr. John W. Bixel, who 
died in Tacoma last July. Mr. 
Bixel was founder and conductor 
of the Tacoma Oratorio Society. 


Auburndale 


Miss Dorothy L. Patriquin, 93 
Charles street, who has enrolled 
in the fourteen-months course in 
One of his distinguished pupils is attendant nursing at the House- 
Hugh Thompson, singing this bold Nursing Association. Bos- 
year in Boston with the Metro- t° n - * s fitting herself to meet an 


The Intermedite Youth Group 
of the First Methodist Church 
will meet in the Chapel on Sun- 
day at 4.45 p. m. 


politan Opera Company. 


COM mo v w k \ I. Ill of 
M \SSAC lirsKTTS 
1 . • N. PROLATE COURT 

ail persons interested in the 

e of 

of Xowton in said County, de- 


\ rthur S. I’fBlimly 

A petition has l>f<n 
said Court f r probate 
instrument purporting t 
XV ill of said dec eased 
Peabody of Newton 


the 


. ing thrit he 
of. without 


his bond. 
If 


appoilitei 

ving 


.1 n ni or. 

presented to 
of a certain 
» be the last 
•y Arthur S. 
tid Count; 


executor 
mrety on 


desir. 


apper 


object thereto you 
:i 1 1 ..!-f . v- should file a written 
rue in si Id Court at Ciun- 
..f r> • • ii o’clock in the fore- 
noon on the eighteenth day of March 
39 »*;. the return day of this citation. 

W'ltno John 1 l^eggat, Esquire, 
Fir«t Judge of «.aid Court, thi - twen- 
tieth dny of February in *he year one 
thou . 1 -id nine hundred and forty-six. 

■ P. JOR1 IAN, 

<N) f 2 S-m 7-14 Register. 


COM MtiN WK M.T1I OF 
M NNSACHI'SKTTS 

PROBATE COURT 
persons interested in the 


in 


hee' 


ented to 


nth 


pre 

pi ' tug that Frances M. 
vewton „ said County. He 
idivini'tratrix of said »«- 
ut giving a surety on her 


if yc*u ' • -re to obK' t thereto you 
or votir attorney should file a written 
appe • !-.-> in * in said Court at Cam- 
hi -ige before ten o'clock in the fore- 
) o •' on the twentieth day of March 
the return day of thin citation. 
Wit tie . - .id,'; r I/egg. it. Esquire, 

F t Judge .if -.tid Court, this twen- 
tieth day of February in the year one 
thousand nln- hundred and forty-six. 

LORINQ P. JORDAN. 
fN) f 2 S-m 7-14 Register. 


PUBLIC HEARING 


acute peacetime need. She 
taking an intensive six-weeks 
course in household economics at 
the school at 222 Newbury 
street, to be followed by a year’s 
training in one of the hospitals 
affiliated with the school, and a 
final two-weeks instruction at 
the school. 


ini, President of the Boston 
Braves and Guido Rugo, Vice- 
Pros., bpth of whom s*poke a few 
moments to the gathering. Also 
Mr. John Quifin, General Manag- 
er and Mr. William Sullivan, 
Public Relations Director were 
present. 

There was a short business 
meeting, the following officers 
were elected: President (reelect- 
ed) Chester T. Holbrook of New- 
ton Centre; Vice-President, Mrs. 
Stuart Shepard of Brookline; 
Treasurer, Mrs. William C. Ross 
of Chestnut Hill; Secretary, Mrs. 
Angelq F. Silva of Gloucester; 
Chairman of the Entertainment 
Mrs. Chester T. 
Holbrook of Newton Centre; As- 
sistants, Mrs. Florence Creighton 
of Quincy, Mrs. Eben H. Hall of 
Swampscott, Mrs. Russell L. 


Crest School, is fast making 
name for herself as a pianist and 
the ease with which she accom- 
panied Miss Possclt’s classical se- 
lections won the hearts of all. The 
singer of the evening, Miss Ruth- 
anne Cavanaugh, 16 year old 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Cavanaugh of Burlington, Mass., 
is also a pupil of Miss Posselt. 
Possessed of a beautiful soprano 
voice and a charming personality, 
her renditions of "Morning Morn- 
ing” by Ole Speaks; Dvork’s 
"Going Home” and "One Kiss” 
merited the ovation she received. 
The Betty Barrett School of 
Dancing with Mr. Plummer, a 
Bay Stater from Roxbury, as 
their accompanist at the piano 
gave us several enjoyable dances. 
"Helpy Selpy Laundry” and a 
Hawaiian number was given by 


of public trust and the narrow 
self-centered pressure groups. 

"Yet we must have faith,” he 
added. "It was a living vibrant 
faith that caused the Pilgrims to 
face possible shipwreck and fam- 
ine; it was a living faith that 
inspired Thomas Jefferson to 
write the document that declared 
all men are created equal; and 
it was the same living faith that 
caused our forefathers to push 
the frontiers of this country west 
over rivers and plains and moun- 
tains. 

Maid Convicted on 
Larceny Charge 

— o — 

A young woman, 18 years of 
age, who had been employed as 
a maid in the home of Vivienne 
King, noted dramatic lyric sop- 
rano, well known in theatrical 
and entertainment circles, of 28 
Bullough Park, Newtonville, was 
arrested last Friday at Ashburn- 
ham, Mass., by Chief Nicholas 
Veduccio, Sgt. Philip Purcell and 


In 


the ensemble: Martha Hunter, 

Berne Manson, Cecile Walker, 

Marilyn Miller and LaVerne Pru- Inspcct0T Jo°seph B. Lyons of the 
deau. There was a special tap y 
and acrobatic number by Bern 
Manson, and the Mexican Jump- 
ing Beans was performed by 
Sally Smith and Barbara Huff- 
man. After much persuasion Mrs 
Alphonse L. Barrette of Fall 
River, sang us a lovely solo, with 
Miss Dolly Morrow of Swamp- 
scatt, at the piano. Miss Morrow, 
alsb played for community sing- 
ing. 

Nearly a hundred Bay Staters 
attended this party and became 
better acquainted. People wePc 
present from over forty different 
cities and towns in Massachu- 
setts. The Meeting closed with 
the singing of the Star Spangled 
Banner. 


Newton Police Department, 
the Newton District Court on 
Monday morning she was ar- 
raigned on a larceny charge and 
sentenced to an indefiite term at 
the Women’s Reformatory at 
Sherborn. 

While employed at the King 
residence she had disappeared 
with a Persian lamb coat valued 
at $1500, a cameo pin valued at 
$350, and a diamond ring valued 
at $600. She had pawned the 
ring in Boston and had purchas- 
ed a railroad ticket to Los An- 
geles, California, but was appre- 
hended by the police a short time 
before she was to have Started on j 
her trip to the West. 


’My Sister Eileen' 

To Be Presented 
In Auburndale 

"My Sister Eileen” has been 
selected for the forthcoming pro* 
duction of the Auburndale Club, 
to be given on April 5 and A, 
under the direction of Maude G. 
Higgins. 

The large cast was selected 
without difficulty from the many 
who reported for the try-outs a 
week ago. The part of Eileen 
will be played by Patricia Don- 
ovan of Auburndale, who is a 
graduate of Leland Powers 
School and who has had expe- 
rience with summer stock com- 
panies. The sister, Ruth, will be 
played by Charlotte Appelt Reed, 
whom local playgoers will re- 
member for the excellent acting 
in the past. 

The part of Appopolous, one 
of the most laughable characters 
in recent plays, will be taken by 
Francis X. Carmody of Auburn- 
dale, until recently a Comman- 
der in the Navy. 

Others in the cast include 
Richard Zoller, Lester York, 
George Betten, Edwin Harkins, 
Henry Furniss, A. L. Sears, 
Betty Ann Higgins, Lendell Lay- 
man, Robert Reed, Barbara Lov- 
ell, Elizabeth Amidon, Clifford 
Beecher, Harry Thompson, Tha- 
lia Higgins. 

The stage will be done by Fred 
Stearns who has so ably built 
the sets for Auburndale plays 
for the past twenty years. He 
will be assisted by Darragh Hig- 
gins. Helen Terkelson is the 
chairman of the drama commit* 
tee. 


You can take 

General MacArthurs 

word for /t f 


COMMON WK \|.TH OF 
MASSAC III SETTS 

Middlesex, .v«. PROBATE COURT 
To all persons interested !n the 

estate of 

Joseph K. Burke 

lat* of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased 

A petition has Been presented to 
said Court for probnte of a certain 
instrument purporting to he the la-' 
will of said deceased by far "I V. 
Frve of Newton in said County, pray- 
ing that she be appointed executrix 
thereof, without giving a surety on 
her bond. 

If you ties! re to ohje^ • thereto you 
or your attorney, should file a written 
appearance in aaid Court ut Cam- 
bridge before ten o’elock in Mi" fore- 
noon on the eighteenth day of March 
1 D« 6 . the return day of this .it, ton. 

Witness, John f. Ksuuire, 

First Judge of jnid Court, this twen- 
ty-third da> of February in the year 
thousand nine hundred and forty- 


six. 


LOR INC P. 


OR l*AN. 


CITY OF NEWTON 
Massachusetts 

The Planning Board Acting as 
the Board of Survey will give a 
public hearing at City Hall. New- 
ton Centre. Mass., on Thursday 
evening, March 7, 1946, at 6:45 


Notice is hereby given that, the 
Commissioner of Public Welfare 
will give a public hearing at of 
Room 800, 15 Ashburton Place, , Hartmann 
Boston, at 2 P. M. on the 29th 
day of March, 1946, in the mat- 
ter of the Incorporation of New- 
ton Tuberculosis and Health As- 
sociation Inc. under the provi- 
sions of General Laws, Tercen- 
tenary Edition, chapter 180, sec- 
tion 6 

PATRICK A. TOMPKINS. 

Commissioner. 

IN) f28-m7-14 
Advertisement 

NEWTON COOPERATIVE 
BANK 

The Annual Meeting of the 
Shareholders of the Newton Co- 
operative Bank will be held at 
the office of the Bank, 305 Wal- 
nut Street, Newtonville, on Tues- 
day, March 19, 1946, at 8 o’clock 
p. m. to elect Directors and a 
Clerk for the ensuing year and 
to transact any other business 
that may legally come before the 
meeting. 

Warren W. Oliver. 

Clerk. 


o'clock P.M.. 
tion of the following: 

Proposed road running south- 
easterly from Greenwood Street, 
Newton Centre, known as Hart- 
man Road, on a plan and profile 
road in property of Arnold 


A sound motion picture "King 
of Kings,” will be given at the 
First Methodist Church on Sun- 
day, March 3, at 7 p. m. This film 
takes two hours to show. 

— o — 

A Workers’ Conference, will be 
held at the First Methodist 
Church on Tuesday, 'March 5, at 
7:45 p. m. 

— o — 

Wednesday, March 6, an official 
board meeting and special quart- 
erly conference of the First Meth- 
odist Church will be held in the 
Chapel at 7:45 p. m., for a report 
and discussion of the Planning 
Committee, concerning altera- 
tions for the Young People 
Group, a new parsonage, and a 
new parish house. 

— o — 

The Fort Niters will meet in 
the Parish Hall of the First 
Methodist Church at 9 p. m., Sun- 
day. Hostesses will be Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert B. Proctor. 

— o — 

Mrs. Elizabeth Boston of 132 
High street, served as hostess on 
Monday, February 18, at 8 p. m. 
for a group of ladies who are in- 
terested in organizing a new 
chapter of "Daughters of the 
British Empire.” The guest 
speaker was Miss Anstace Jen- 
kinson of 23 Auburn street, 
Brookline. President of the State 
Council. Refreshments were 
served by the hostess. 

— o — 

Miss Beverly Boardman of 
Thurston road, was hostess to the 
Sub-Deb Club on Sunday from 
3 to 5 p.m. Following a short busi- 
ness meeting a buffet supper was 
enjoyed by the group. The club 


for the considera- j will hold a party at the home of 
Miss Ellen Cronin, Medford, on 
Saturday, February 9, with a pro- 
gram of entertainment, followed 
by dancing and refreshments. The 
next business meeting will be 
hold at the homo of Miss Mary 


and New England DeRusha of Newton Highlands on 
Peabody Home in Newton, Mass., March 1. 

Rowland H. Barnes and Com- — o — 

pany, Civil Engineers. The Kum-A-LUC Club will meet j 

WILLARD S. PRATT, ' at the home of Mrs. Flora Bliss on 
Clerk of the Planning Hoard Chester street, Newton Highlands 
Acting as the Board of Survey, on Thursday, March 7, at 8 p. m. i 


" The Red Cross has done a 100 per cent 
/ob in this theatre. Mathematical limita- 
tions alone prevent my saying the Red 
Cross services here have been more than 
100 per cent." 

— General Douglas MacArthur 

S O speaks a distinguished eye-witness of youf Red Cross in 
action. General MacArthur saw the Red Cross at your fight- 
ing man’s side, all through the gruelling months of the Pacific 
campaign. He saw Red Cross huts in the swelterifig jungle, 
bringing a touch of home to homesick, heartsick men. 

He knows that wherever your fighting man went, your Red 
Cross went, too — that wherever, whenever that man needed 
respite and recreation, help with a personal problem, or just 
someone to talk to, the Red Cross was there. • 

He also knows, as you do, that your Red Cross cannot yet 
say, "Mission accomplished.” It still has an enormous task 
to do. 

Ona War Is over . . . but another War has begun 

Thousands of our men still in veterans’ hospitals and in far- 
away lands overseas need comfort and cheer now, as they did 
when the bombs were bursting. And as our servicemen return 
to civilian life, your Red Cross must lend a helping hand. 

And when disaster strikes here at home — fire, flood, tornado 
— your Red Cross must be ready with aid for the victims. Its 
war against human misery is never wholly won. 

So remember — it is your Red Cross. It depends on you for 
its very existence. So give from your heart. Give generously. 
Give today ! 


r , , -i;:,.". 

■. ! v f-xy'.ctj/uifi' 


0 




fcX. 


v\ 


spit" ■ 


i n >i >m % u , t r r ,i of 
m \ss.u iirsi ns 

Mrtdl***x. PROBATE OOCRT 

To all pereons interes’ed m th* 
MUt« of 

LooUe W. Burk Hu r>)t 

l»t» N'»t'-n in i** 14 County, de- 
cm rued * 

A petition hai« been presented to 
■aid Court for probute <>t a certain 
Instrument purportlnK to he the hint 
will of K.i.l lie. ."is.-. | hy Ralph I*- 
BliM-hofT .f Brookline In th» County 
of Norfolk, praying that *h" be ap- 
pointed executor thereof, without ||lv- 
1 n k •> aui'-ty <»n bin bond. 

If you Be id re to object thereto >' 


t nu MON tv f: \ i , tii < » » 

>i tss \cH i sk r r»* 

Middlesex. PROBATE COl KT 
To a 'I person- interested in the 
estate of 

f on»tanr* V. I rahtree 
late of Newton in said Count", de- 


A petit ii 


or your a 

uppt-urntii 

bridge b'lfol'a 
noon on the ■ 
1916 


ney should file a 

Maid ' 


rilteli 


of Middle 
appointed 
Hiving u » 


n ha* been presented tn 

for probate ,,f H "ertain 
purporting to he the last 
! dec,.»eef| by Shite Street 
pan v of Boat on In the 
' irf. Ik and Harvard H. 

’ Newton ii -oild County 
•x. pra \ lug that they be 
- x. ' utoi s t hereof, without 
ret y oh tllHlr bolide. 

-'ii- i., olijc t thereto you 
llld file a written 


ill 


Wii 


•S*. Jo 


la-ggat. Em | 


teuton Si. 194« 


1«WJ (fe w 


LOjiiXi y. JOJil'N • 


I I .GRIN (j 

» INJ MV-mT-14 


nil in the for 


JORD W 

RegUlefV 


YOUR 


Red Cross 


MUST CARRY ON 


THIS ADVERTISEMENT IS SPONSORED BY 

McIntyre company 

15 RIVERDALE AVENUE NEWTON 


V 


PAGE NINE 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1946 


THE NEWTON 


REAL ESTATE 


REAL ESTATE 


HOUSES 

WANTED 


CASH CUSTOMERS WIITINQI 
List Vour Property with a 
REALTOR 

HOWE ASSOCIATES 

ADA Common wealth Attnnt.. Newton Centre 

Call aid. 5600 


HELP WANTED 


HELP WANTED 


GRAPHIC. 

WANTED 


WANTED 


MORTGAGE SERVICE 

If you are about tq buy, build, or possibly refinance your present 
mortgage, consult a firm with a background of over 100 years 
of dependable service. Interest rates as low as 4 r /e. Construction • 
permanent loans arranged, one title examination for both. Re- 
gardless of what type of mortgage you wish to arrange, be sure 
to consult us first. No* commission charged. Prompt attention 
assured. Mortgage loan correspondents for 

PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

REALTORS 

1297 Beacon Street, Brookline 46 - - - ASPinwall 1604 


1 


W-O-M-E-N 

Needed at Once for Permanent Work 
Riveters — Inspectors — Assemblers 
Light Press Operators 

Experience Not Essential 
5-Day 44-fHour Week 
Morning and Afternoon Rest Periods 
New Plant. Excellent Working Conditions. Good Woges. 

ARK-LES SWITCH CORP. 

51 WATER STREET WATERTOWN 

One Block from If'atertoicn Square 


HIGHEST AMOUNT of 

CASH 

FOR YOUR 

CAR 

WRITE, PHONE or DRIVE IN 

Weed Any Repairing ? Expert Mechanics Arailahlr. 

MYRAN MOTORS, Inc. 

75 NO. BEACON 8T., WATERTOWN WAT. 7000 


SPECIAL. NOTICE TO BUILDERS 

FOR CJATF ,01 ' OF LAND LOCATED AT 

" "IV O/Atj-Ei 10 CHARLES STREET (Rear) 

Auburndale 
desirable. 

M. J. Odence 


from 1 14 to 1 i acres. ‘Very 


133 BROAD ST., BOSTON 
TELEPHONE HANcnck 398B 
Residence — 77 Beaumont Ave., Newlonville-BIG. 7210 


WANTED 


Girl with stenographic training. Permanent 
position in Waltham. Favorable working con- 
ditions. Apply in person. 


HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORP. 

282 MOODY STREET WALTHAM 


For . . . 

NEWTON 
REAL ESTATE 

. . . See 

Paul Harris Drake 

626 Cnmmomveulth Ave. 
NEWTON CENTRE 

DECatur 1020 


iJrtoton 


For Real Estate Service ( 

iEWTON ESTATES T 

BIGelow 1280 

j* 

s,„. ciahsls in Beal Estate 4 


Replica Brick-end Colonial with oval 
Portico and lantern, encompnssrd by 
snox-cappcd grounds and hedges, 6 
bedrooms, 3 baths, first floor lavatory; 
living room exquisitely proportioned 
with plen.dng mantle and bookcases; 
sleeping porch nnd other winsome de- 
tails. Occupancy 45 days. Call 


Blarloi 


:inn« till- 


IH-.M ( Nights) 


Alvord Bros., Realtors 
Newton Centre, Mass. 


Active Intelligent Woman 

Over 28, who wants opportunity for 
good Income. Previous business ex- 
perience not essential. We train you. 
Write, Stating Phone Number to 

GRAPHIC BOX R. F. 


FOR SALE 


FOR SALE 




WANTED: Part time worker 
| to do excellent cooking, week- . 
ends. Two in family. Protestant. 1 
References. Big. 0215. f28 


LOW RATE MORTGAGES 

If you are paying more than 4 , j r n 
interest on your mortgage, we can 
•ave you hundreds o! dollars. No 
fee — confidential service. Call, 
write, phone. 

N. BUTLER 

tl) Bnvlstnn St.. Boston II. AW IDH3 


WANTED 

We have several clients desir- 
ous of purchasing single and 
two family houses. List your 
property FOR SALE with 
Newton's Fastest Growing 
Real Estate Organization and 
insure prompt satisfactory 
results. 

JOHN J. BAGLEY 

634 Commonwealth Avenue 

NEWTON CENTRE 
Tel. L ASell 1687-5716 


WANTED in Wcllesiey Hills, a 
cleaning woman regularly, 4 to 
6 days a week. A block and a 
third from bus line. Call WEL- 
lesley 0413. fl4-3t 


Folding Screen M.tM 

Electric Humidifier SIO.W 

Electric Heater Bowl . SR.ttf 

4.H Box Spring and Walnut 

Headboard Mfl.flf 

Bargains in Furniture 

SEELEY BROS. CO. 

767 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTONVILLE 
Tel. — BIGelow 7441 


WANTED: Returned veteran 
urgently needs good running car 
with good tires, for business. 
Private party preferred. Will pay 
cash, if necessary. Big. 3717. 

f28z 

VVANTKDr~a~ good' fly'flshing 
rod by private party. Write L. 
S. Lewis. 126 St. Mary's Street. 
Boston. f28z 

PRIVATE PARTY Irsrr o 
purchase for personal use steel 
bait casting and fly casting rod 
and other equipment: if what 
you have will not be put to use. 
Telephone Bigelow 3237. f23z 


W-A-N-T-E-D 

Old Furniture. China ftrle-a-Bra« 
Hlghegt Frier* Paid 

HITCHCOCK HOUSE 

1461 Waihlngton Bt.. - • »fc«i Newtan 
Call W Al.lham SI20-M 


HOUSEHOLD SERVICES 


WANTED: Private family will- 
ing to accept telephone calls re- 
sulting from local newspaper ad- 
vertising. Possibly 5 or 10 calls 
per week. Suitable payment will 
be arranged. Call Arlington 3812. 

f28z 


WANTED: To locate boy in 
Waban who phoned me regard- 
ing 1931 Chevrolet. Big. 5443. 

f28z 


PAINTING-PAPERHANGING 

»._r- 

—rf f elllnc* Whitened 


(j FURNITURE 

f REFlMSHFII 

f' L£~ y 

Excellent Work 


Reynolds & 


„/ — Henderson 


BIGelow 2T II 


^■HI PERSIAN RUG * fh* nob'djf uxorttsion of th* humbletf 
w ®o Often If it rh# only medium he hot to tell nit 
vmple story to people neor and far Of course some are better 
rhon Others in their interpretot' ve ort It it Our constant o>m *o 
b ever m seorch for such gen*s for our trade m new shipments 
from Persia 

Treat yourself to o G&EGOPIAN RUG and enjoy it m your 


rierofion a^d 

m fhat af '/oor children. 




A FEW EXAMPLES 


5.5 

x 9.2 

BOUKARA 

$375.00 

5.3 

x g.1 

BIBIK ABAD 

265.00 

7.1 

xi 2.4 

BACHTIARI 

375 00 

9 0 

xi 2.4 

BIDJAR' 


S3 

xi 0.4 

3AROUK 

. . . 575 00 

4.10x10 4 

8HIRAZ 


4 6 

x 6.0 

KESHAN 


4.2 

x 7.0 

CABI8TAN 


4.3 

x 5 6 

SHIRAZ 

1 1 0 00 

10.6 

x17 

TABRIZ 


10.4 

xi 8.4 

KAZVIN 

. 1575.00 


AND MANY OTHERS 


A Gregorian Bug today is an heirloom tomorrow 


Arthur T. Gregorian 

2306 Washington 8tr««t — Newton Lower Falls 
Telephone BIGelow 2563 

( Opposite Groce Street) 


TURNISHED ROOMS 


MAN or woman, soda fountain 
and general drug store work. Ex- 
! pcrience not essential. Salary and 
. hours arranged. Apply Shepard 
j Pharmacy of Newton, Inc., 1265 
| Centre Street, Newton Centre. 

f28 

BOOKKEEPER • STENOG- 
RAPHER. excellent opportunity, 
working in Newton. State age, I 
experience and salary desired. 
Write Graphic box T.C. f28-2t : 


RETRIEVER PUPPIES 
FOR SALE 

Males $30 — Females $20 
FRANK McELROY 
31 Wellesley Ave., Needham 
NEEdham 0653-R 


PLYMOUTH on route 3 over- 
looking the sea and hills of Man- 
omet. Large year round house 
with porches, fireplaces, 3 Is 
baths. Stable, spacious grounds. 
Ideal location for guest house or 
convalescent home. Only $12,000. 
Braintree 0284. f28lf | 


NURSING HOME 

Attractive sunny room available 
now. ('hcKlnul Street, 

West Newton. 

Telephone BIGelow 6526 


WANTED: Housekeeper 

comp. maid. For business couple 
| with two high school children, 
j Ref. Live in or out. $25. Call 
Big. 2685 after six. f28z 


HOUSE WANTED 


ROOM in Newtonville, warm 
sunny room in private family. 

Gentleman pre- 


Veteran wants to buy modern 
2-family house, in Newton, Wal- 
tham, Watertown or Belmont. 
Call Wat. 9107. f28 

WANTED TO BUY: Two-fam- J 
lly house in Newton Corner with 
oil heat, breakfast nook and ga- 
rage. Good location near church- 
es. $500 cash, and substantial 
payment when I dispose of my 
property. Address "H.B.", Gra- 
phic Office. 

WANTED, 4 bedroom house in 
$8500 to $10,000 range. Can wait 
6 months for occupancy. Write 
Box S of W. f28 


| Best location, 
j ferred. Call Big. 
p.m. 


4216 after 6 
f21-2t 


i Is there some young housewife 
[ who could spare four or five 
mornings a week to do house- 
work in small Waban home? 
Someone in the vicinity of New- 
ton Lower Falls would be most 
convenient. Telephone Las. 0551 
evenings. f28-2tz 


WANTED: Furnished room on 
bathroom floor by a lady in Prot- 
estant house for occupancy some- 
time in March. Address K. L.. 
Graphic Office. f28z 


WANTED: Room with bath in 
Newton Centre for woman execu- 
tive of local social agency. April 
1st or before. Tel. Big. 4911. 

f28z 


WANTED: Handyman and 
chauffeur for children's furniture 
shop. Part time. Call Big. 1692. 

f28 


THE COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 


APARTMENTS WANTED 


WANTED TO RENT: About 
April 1, single or duplex house, 
furnished or unfurnished, by ' 
Harvard Law student with 2 I 
children, youngest 2 weeks old. I 
T. P. Ford. Kirkland 5339. f28z 

lost and found 

LOST SAVINGS BANK BOOKS 


I AM DESPERATE 

looking for r place to live. Can you 
help me? I am a responsible buslnfoi 
man. Family of three. Do you have 
a home or apartment to rent? 

Phone HANcock 8500, Ext. 305 


WANTED: Furnished apart- 
ment, two or three rooms and 
bath, by mother and adult 
daughter. Near Newton Secre- 
tarial School. Tel. WAL. 5684-M. 

f21-2tz 


Sitting* Hank* Hunks a* listed he low 
aro lost anil aiuillcallnn has been made 
for payment* of the account* In ue- 
rordnnre with See. 40 < * h n ft \fifl of the 
Act* of 100.1 and amendment*. 

Aewton Savings Bank Book No. 
88172 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
90119 

Auburndale Co operative Matured 
Share Certificate No. 1668 
Newton National Bank Book No. 
4055 

Newton Co operative Bank Book 
No. 15341 

Newton Suvings Bank Book No. 
76732 

West Newton Savings Bunk Book 
No. 22543 

Newton Savings Bank Book No. 
72157 

Newton-Waltlinm Bunk & Trust 
Co. No. V- 12484 

Newton-Waltham Bank A- Trust 
Co. No. V-118911 
Co. No. VI-1991 1 


WANTED by teacher, small, 
unfurnished, heated apartment 
in the Newtons. Or would be 
glad to share someone’s home. 
Tel. BIG. 3021. f21-2tz 

FORMER NAVAL OFFICER, 
wife, 20 mo. child looking for 
4-6 room unfurnished apartment 
Newton, Wellesley. Professor at 
Business School, Boston College. 
Mr. Carmichael. Reading 1371-M 
or Big. 1480, Ext. 45. f28-4tz 

MISCELLANEOUS 


Petition to Foreclose Tax Lien 

(Seal) No. 27739 

To All Whom It May Concern, 
and to John N. Hodge and Mrs. 
1 John N. Hodge, now or formerly 
of Newton in the County of Mid 
dlesex and said Commonwealth. 
! or their heirs, devisees or legal 
| representatives. 

Whereas, a petition has been 
presented to said Court by the 
City of Newton, a municipal cor- 
poration, located in the County 
of Middlesex and said Common- 
wealth, to foreclose all rights of 
redemption from the tax lien 
proceedings described in said pe- 
tition in and concerning a cer- 
tain parcel of land situate in said 
City of Newton in the County of 
Middlesex and in said Common 
wealth, bounded and described 
in said petition as follows: 

About 590 square feet of land 
on Tudor Terrace, being more 
particularly described in Section 
40, Block 4A, Lot 22A of As- 
sessors’ Plans. 

If you desire to make any ob- 
jection or defense to said peti 


WANTED: Old. but serviceable 
car or truck. Would like model 
A Ford. Call Mrs. S. C. Currier. 
Big. 5443. f28z 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF~ 

MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 

Petition to Foreclose Tax Lien 

(Seal) No. 27860 

To All Whom It May Concern, 
and to Any persons interested in 
the George M. Briggs Construc- 
tion Company, formerly having 
a place of business in Newton, 
in the County of Middlesex and 
said Commonwealth, who have 
not released their interest in'the 
land hereinafter described: 

| George M- Briggs, formerly of 
j said Newton, deceased, and Mary 
; E. Briggs, residence unknown, 
or their heirs, devisees or legal 
I representatives. 

| Whereas, a petition has been 
j presented to said Court by the 
City of Newton, a municipal cor- 
poration. located in the County 
of Middlesex and said Common- 
wealth, to foreclose all rights of 
redemption from the tax lien 
proceedings described in said pe- 
tition in and concerning a cer- 
tain parcel of land situate in said 
City of Newton in the County 
FURNITURE FOR SALE: of Middlesex and in said Com- 


Bicycles Repaired 

Galled for & Delivered 

ALGONQUIN 8258 


R. A. Unction & Sons, Inc. 
REPAIR WORK 
Promptly Attended To 
Contractors and Builders 
22 Union St., Newton Centre 
Tel DECatur 0072 


UPHOLSTERING 
Mattresses Made To Order 
Inner Spring Mattresses 

T. B. HAFFEY CO. 

Car Wmthlactsn St. aod Centre A**.. 
T«L BIGelow mil Established ISM 

Nrwtoa 


Tel. STA. 4111 All Work Guaranteed 

Conrad A. Tjernstrom 

Interior and Exterior Painting 
Paperhanging, Kalsominlng 
19 Montfern Ave. Brighton 


PAINTINGPAPERHANGING 
also Ceilings 

FLOORS REFIMSHED 

EXCELLENT WORK 
ESTIMATES GIVEN 

W. REYNOLDS 

BIGelow 2711 


COWAN 

BUILDERS 

• Roofing 

• Remodeling 

• Repairing 

181 PARKER ST. 
Newton Centre 
Telephone BIG. 535T 


CARPETS 

12 ft. wide 

WILTON figured 

tone on tone 

27 Inch wide nottle effects 

ORIENTAL RUGS 

Direct from Importer 

Call 

W. H. Robinson 

formerly with Paine 
Furniture Co. 
WATertown 4763 


GAS STOVE 

Brunei new “Roper” 1943 mod- 
el. Top 40"x26". t burner*, 
insulated oven will* thermostat. 
Priee 8113.00. Can be aeen nt 
333 Commonwealth Ave.. New- 
ton Centre. 

BIGelow 5500 

Evenings — DECatur 1505 


FIREPLACE WOOD, oak, well 
seasoned! Any length. Will de- 
liver during next two months. J. 
C. Walker, WAYland 118, ring 3. 

nl-tf 




Interior 
Decorating 

of All Kind* 
Paintlnt 
Paprrhancinc 
Collin** Kal»o- 
mined 

\ Floor* Reflnlsbed 

Expertly Done 

Prompt Service 

HAROLD P. JOHNSON 

25 Year* In Brlmont 

Call BELmont 3667 


monwealth, bounded and de- 
scribed in said petition as fol- 
lows: 

About 148 square feet of land 
on Clark terrace, being more 
particularly described in Section 
25, Block 3, Lot 2 of Assessors' 
Plans. 

If you desire to make any ob- 
EDISON PHONOGRAPH, hand jection or defense to said peti- 
wound, 25 records. $35. Also an tion you or your attorney must 
attachment to play Victor rec- file a written appearance and an 
ords, $8. Italian Stradella pi- answer, under oath, setting forth 
ano accordion. 56 keys, $45. Cor- : clearly and specifically your ob- 
net and case, $35. Big. 5520. f2S!jcctions or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 


Bedroom pieces, living room 
pieces, 9 x 12 Sahara rug. Also 
a few antiques. All in good con- 
dition. Call BIG. 5386. f21-tf 

TRY OI R FRESH EGGS with 
fine flavor and high food value. 
Call NEE. 1873-J for prompt de- 
livery. f21-2tz 


JOSEPH RICHARD 

FLOOR SANDING 
and REFINISHING 

Call WALtham 2S21-W 


PAINTING 

PAPERHANGING 


INSIDE and 

OUTSIDE 


Catlings WhHanad 
Floors Sandad and 
RoflnMied 


WALLPAPER REMOVED 
by ELECTRIC MACHINE 


First Class Work 
Reasonable Fricas 


FRANK E. O’DEA 

400 CalHomla St.. NewtanviMa 



BIG. 9661 


Complete Exterminating 
Service 

TERMITES, ANTS, INSECTS 
AND RODENTS 

JOS. E. LaGASSE CO. 

KEN. 2181 or BIQ. 3123 


Where to BUY IT, RENT IT, SELL IT, 
or HAVE IT REPAIRED 


FOR SALE: Beautiful red. 
large-grained Alligator bag. 
suede-lined, used twice. Cost 321. 
two months ago. will sacrifice for 
$14. Call Las. 7459. f28z 


FOR SALE, fireplace coal in 
hags. Approximately 3500 lbs. 

Call Las. 3539. f28 

USED Wardrobe trunk, com- 
pletely fitted. Medium sized. In 
good condition. Call Las. 2224. 

f28 


FOR SALE: Glcnwood gas 
range with oven controls. Six gas 
burners, two ovens. In good con- 
dition. $50. Call Las. 8686. f2Sz forthwith once each week 


the Recorder of said Court 
Boston i at the Court House*, on 
or before the eleventh day of 
March next. 

Unless your appearance Is 
filed by or for you. your default ! 
will be recorded, the said peti- 
tion will be taken as confessed 
and you will be forever barred 
from contesting said petition or 
any decree entered thereon. 

And in addition to the usual 
service of this notice as required 
b> law, it is ordered that the 
foregoing citation be published 
for 


Painting & Decorating 
Paperhanging 

E. J. ELLARD 

10 Bradford Rtl.. Watertown WAT. T4T9 


Antiques 


Painting 


THE SERVICE CO. 
HERB SWANSON 

*5 MAY AM- ROAD 
IK Year*' Experience 
Commercial — Domestic 

REFRIGERATION SERVICE 

ANY MAKE 

WAItham 5408-R 


HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

for ant-Quet. »ll»er. brle-»-br*e. 
rhtna. gla»*. picture* and furnltnr* 
Call dm? or nubt 

M. MARCUS, BIG. 0S43 

t.%9 WALNUT STREET 
NEWTONVILLE— or 
1ST t Commonwealth At*.. Brlihloa 
Beacon <*690 


PAINTING t DECORATING 

by 

Deagle ft Aucoin 

BIO. 0758 — LAS 4538 


Appliances 


English. Tel. Lasoll 2318. f28z 
FOR SALE 9 Pair of Misses' 
riding boots, size 6 1 a ; excellent 
pre-war leather. Originally from 
London Harness Shop. Only 
worn twine. Tel. LASrll 3651. f28 

_ — ... FOR SALK: Men's new suits, 

tion you or your attorney must j 8£ay, 38-40 of 42 material white 
file a written appearance and an 


FOR SALK: Hand printing ‘ hre< ; su " oss '" ' v “ k * ln lhe 
proas. Official No. .1 Chase 5x7. 6. Nc "[ to " Graphic * newspaper 
8 and 10 pi. type. Some Old published in sa,d Newton. 

t -,„n *vj , ti coo-. ' Witness. John E. Fenton. Es- 
quire. Judge of said Court, this 


Newton Savings 
91320. 

Bunk ' 

‘Book 

No. 

Newton Suvings 
71685. 

Bunk 

Book 

No. 

Newton Savings 
91,510. 

Bank 

Book 

No. 

Newton Suvings 
63146. 

Bunk 

Book 

No. 

Newton Suvings 
71069. 

Bunk 

Book 

No. 

Newton Suvings 
63116. 

Bunk 

Book 

No. 

Newton Suvings 

Hunk 

Book 

No. 


RENT a singer Sewing 
chine for us long as desired In- 
quire about our special rates 
L'lasst’s in dressmaking, home dec- 
orations, children's clothes and 
make-over now forming; morning 
afternoon and evening classes. 
Singer Sewing Machine Co., 424 
Moody St. Waltham. Tel. WA1. 
3331. d2tf 


RADIO REPAIRS at low prices. 
Newton Music Store. LAS. 0610. 
#27tf 

HAVE VOliU Sewing Machine 
serviced by our bonde*. service 
men in vour own home. All parts 
ami work guaranteed. Singer 
Sowing Machine Co.. 42-1 Moody 
St., Waltham. Tel. WAL. 3331. 

d2tf 


Seeley Bros. Co. 

DIHTINCTIY K UPIIOLBTEKINO 
Window bhatlra 

Mai I ret* Maker. Mitfqura Ketlnred 
Fhona BIGelow Till E*l. 11*64 
TSTA Wathlnclon nt,. Newtonville 


Din scrap lumber I load $7.f>l) 
sawed for fireplace, $12.50 bag 
wood 25c a bag or 5 for $1 taken 
Also a few cords ot dry cord wood 
Marshall (' Spring Co.. Inc., 15 
River St.. Newton Lower Fulls 
WKL. SHOO a-'H 8t7 

1 . A. B. RANGE HI RNEK 
SERVICE: Burnt i - S i\ic«tl ant 
Vacuum cleaned. Prompt Serv- 
ice. Call Dec. 1494. fMt 


answer, under oath, setting forth 
clearly and specifically your ob- 
jections or defense to each part 
of said petition, in the office of 
the Recorder of said Court in 
Boston i at the Court House), on 
or before the eleventh day of 
March next. 

Unless your appearance is 
filed by or for you, your default 
will be recorded, the said peti 
tion will be taken as confessed 
and you will be forever barred 


shirts, long sleeves, size 16. night 
shirts: all wool blankets; linen 
napkins, towels, bedspread- 169 
Washington St.. Apt. 7, Newton. 

f28z ; 

lovely dining room set 

(Paine’s) 2 bed room suites, old 
bookcase, desk, odd chairs and of „ 


fifth day of February in the year 
nineteen hundred and forty-six. 
Attest with seal of said Court 
Robert E. French. 

Recorder. 

Joseph W. Bartlett. Esq.. 

75 Federal Street 
Boston. Mass, 
for the Petitioner 

<N> fl4-21-2R 


NEEDHAM FLOOR SERVICE 

Sprrlalut* In 

REFINISHING FLOORS 

WASHED - WAXED - POLISHED 
AUo offlrr and .tore Moor* 

A Moafrn Equtpmfnt L sed 
For Prompt Seme* - ( all NEE t5?J 
WINDOWS CLEANED 


MILLS RADIO & ELECTRIC 

If it's Electrical tee'll fix it! 

ORDER YOUR NEW 
AADIO - WASHER REFRIGERATOR 
— n o w : — 

Siv Walnut St.. .\ewtonvUU-LA5«n *uT» 
Sheet Music - ClaaaleaJ and Popular 
Record* 


Painting - Paperhanging 

Inside & Out Floors & Ceilings 

JOSEPH WRIGHT 

Al Bl RNDALE 
Shop DECatur 1308 
Res BIGelow 5805 

76 CRESCENT STREET 


Printing 


Electrician and Steamtitter ] 

Wiring for li*ht. hr.tt and power. Heat- < 
me *«.*lema inttallrd and rrpatrrd \p ' 
pltanro repair*. Prompt »ervlcf. No joti 1 
too email Reasonable price*. 

II. R. SWEENEY 

131 Sarcent Street. Newton '* j 
Telephone BIO. I.MI 


Fieclrical Appliances 

Flodin Sewing Machine Co. 

Tel. BIG. 3204 

Bcgister Note for Early Dalirere 
257 Wnlnttl Si. MewiomilU 


JAMES F. HUGHES 

Commercial aad 6*«Ut? Pmttsc 
E*tabll*hed II T—n 

t*S WAL.NCT STRUT 
XI WTO TV m ■ 

BlOelew mil 


COMMON WF.AL1H OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, kr TROBATK COl'l 

To all person* interested In t 
estate ot 

William P. Wallace 

unl>. a tula 

, , < .«n >no.,tie net-son. 

tables, Steinway piano (small up- ,u..iji... ,.r ,, u i w, 

right', black ebony case. Electric w.tiu,.- imx pte-ent.-d t . < ..t «■ i 

« .a p /..on roo*. Lor aIIowaik-p hei so. ond ;(* - mm.* 

refrigerator. Call Big. 6182. 128/ „ >ou , . 

or your attorney aliould ill.- .1 win 
ppear.uue in -ud Court ;tt t't 
' ‘ eu oVlotfk in the foi 
loon on the eleventh day of M.t 


ANTIQUES WANTED 


FULL-SIZE child's maple-crib 
and spring in excellent condition, i'ti’rige heroic t 
(no mat tress i. will sell for $10. 
from contesting said petition or originally priced $20. Tel. Big 
any decree entered thereon. elow 2148. f2S 

And in addition to the usual 
service of this notice as required 
by law, it is ordered that the 
foregoing citation he published 
forthwith once each sveek for 
throe successive weeks in the 
Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in said INfewton. 

Witness, John E. Fenton, Es- 
quire. Judge of said Court, this 
fifth day of February in the year 
nineteen hundred and forty-six. 

Attest with seal of said Court. 

Robert E. French, 

Recorder. 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Esq., 

75 Federal Street 
Boston. Me: s. 
for the Petitioner 

(Nl fl I JI-.S 


ANTIQUES WANTED 
Reliable author!** will pa> highrtl 
prim fur tour old (urnllurr. orlrul*i 
rug*, da**. China, brat*, i-oppr r. i<r« 
trr. bromr. »llvcr. Shi-flirlil. rhatulr- 
llera. llrcurm*. flr* »fl». aol*t and •li- 
ver jrarlrt Write u* »h»l >ou have. 
We hIII appralar for >ou. 

it (TKi:r>oHi 

HOI Koylklon Si.. Hoalon KEN IK'-’J 


l'Jifi. the return <(«'. 
w 

l-*ir f f .lu.lpe of *.i!>l I’oiir:. th-x four 
toi'Uth d.t' of ry in the ' o.i 

ono thousand nine hundred nnd forty 

LORI XU )' JORDAN. 
(X) ReiSiner 

mini Ol V l*M I Ms| u \ | OK's 
NOTH’ I I ' IM "I runs "» 

I N xi 1 1 VF vr I ** I ATT 

lixtato . 


Household Furniture 
Storage 

Plano*, trunk*, etc in our new eon- 
erei* and brick modern aarrbuuM 
Individual lockrd room* Separait 
ninth pronl room* for run and over 
• lulTrd furniture 

LICENSED AND BONDED 

Steffens Storage Warehouse 

197 ^ chstf r St. " est Newton 

LAScI 2436 


Carpenters 


Piano Tuners 


HERBERT L. RAY 

CARPENTER 

Repair* prompll* attended It 

70 Walker St., Newtonville 

BIG. 8343 


Furniture M anted 


PIANOS WANTED 

COMPLETE PIANO SERVICE 

LOUIS V HA-FFERMEHL 

Newton Centre 

TeL Bigelow 1501 -Bigelow 1M7 


In 


i 'oil ii t v ..f Midd 
Male, wprewutci 

ourt for »aid (*- 
I i-x. inline all . 
hint the estate of 


WILL BUY 

Marbi* Top Eurnlturr. raindnia. 
Plclvrr*. trame*. Odd and End*. 
Entirr Conlenl* of Home* 
Bonded Rrferenee. 

Richard Gray 

113 OAKIIUE RD NEW TON idl> 
(all DECatur 9T30 Anrtlma 


PI AN C TUNING 

Malh-l*rooSp* and Saaaildln* 

J. W. TAPPER 

14 4RRRUKKX MAUI 
NSW ION HU, HI AND* 

L ASell 1304— BIGelow 0443 


UK that t 
r* there. i 
v on their 


I’ainlt-i * 


Kooft-rs 


SELL YOUR 

TO HALL - BIGiliw 2888 


Eighteen ) can 


Kuril that 
tee nth da' 
me allow., 


FLOORS SANDED 

Skit-'! I Vl KKD ami POLISHED 

I alast Equipment 

F. E. O'DEA - BIG. 9661 

100 ( aliloritia **l . Nf»liui*ill# 


NY. P. LEAVITT SONS COk 
Vny type of ROOKING 
install**] or repaired 
it PEARL ST.. NEWTON 
DECatur 0774 
Newton ■ Oldest Hoofers 












PAGE TEN 


Local Boys Sing 
Mountain Folk Songs 

-o- 

Along with a busy schedule at 
Newton High. Pete Cummings. 
Herb Bailey, and Angi D'Eugenlo 
—all of Newton Centre — have 
found time to study American 
folk songs and to give pleasure 
to others in their colorful ap- 
pearances and spirited program 
of Addle jigs and cowboy songs. 
They are interested in the Jun- 
ior Achievement activities re- 
cently formed at the high school 
and have been the features at 
three Cattle Shows in the west- 
ern part of Massachusetts last 
summer: have played for square 
dances at several Grange meet- 
ings: and were heard in Newton 
and Wellesley on New Year's 
eve. More recently during their 
vacation they gave a special pro- 
gram of music at the New Eng- I 
land Peabody Home for Crippled j 
Children, on Wednesday Febru- j 
thy 20th for the children confined ! 
in that institution. Later that 
same week they were invited to i 
present their interesting pro- [ 
gram as the guests of Brookline 
Lodge A.F. & A.M. where it was 
said they rivaled the singing of 
other well known radio stars 
singing this type of folk songs. ; 

At their appearance in Brook- 
line the “Melody Mustangs”, as 
they call themselves, told some-, 
thing of the early development 
of folk songs: “Bards and mins- 
trels in medieval Europe sang 
to Lords and Ladies in their 
courts and to common people in 
the market places. Their tunes j 
were retained and passed down 
from generation to generation to 
such peoples as Puritans, poor 
farmers and adventurers, who 
carried their culture with them 
to the new world. Ballads and 
hymns of old England were al- 
most universally sung at first. 
Then, as life in the wilderness 
began to develop its own charac- 
teristics, the music sung in 
America began to differ from its 
English prototype. Localized 
verses ere extemporaneously 
sung to old English melodies." j 

"Soon the adventure-seeking 
families in their covered wagons 
made heroic trips across the new 
wild country. They met Indians. 
They were confronted with sick- 
ness. However, the tough ones 
were able to complete their jour- 
ney. In their new homes the pion- 
eers found many occupations. 
Many dug gold; others found 
work driving western cattle from 
the winter pastures in Texas to 
the more fertile grassland in the 
North, then on to market. These 
cowboys adapted the tunes of 
the mountaineer in their own en- 
vironment. They sang of the 
hard work on the Chisholm 
Trail. The subject of many of 
their songs naturally was the 
cows or doggies, that they drove 
. . . and since the cowboy's life 
was lonely, he often sang of the 
girl he left behind, often in a 
very melancholy mood . . . An- 
other favorite pastime of frontier 
America was square dancing. 
Couples would take their places 
on the dance floor, the fiddle 
would ring out, and a ‘caller’ 
would sing the commands. Coun- 
try dancing is still a great fav- 
orite with many country folk . . . 
The value of folk songs lie in 
their simple, direct way of tell- 
ing the singer’s feelings. Often 
he sings of his woes, or his 
blues.” 


With this as a background the 
boys have originated a program 
that touches on the development 
of folk songs in a way that has 
aroused enthusiastic response 
from the audiences they have 
appeared before. Its leader is 
seventeen year old Peter Cum- 
mings, an Honor Roll student 
and an Eagle Scout, who uses a 
guitar in accompanying his own 


COMM ON W KVI.TH OF 
-MASSAC HI. SETTS 

Middlesex, sb. PROBATE COURT 
lo all persons Interested in the 
trust estate under the will of 

Austin H. Herat ur 

Kite of Newton in said County de- 
ce.^od, for the benefit of Florence S. 
Decatur ar.d other*. 

J he trustee* of said estate have 
present* d to said Court for allowance 
their tenth to twelfth accounts, in- 
clusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should tile a written 
appe.ir.m ** In said Court at Cain- 
ondRe before ten o’clock in the fore- 
noon or, i he thirteenth dav of March 

•tui • ration 

W liners. John < l.eggat. Esquire. 
*■ r . st Judge of said < ourt this 
eighteenth day of February in the 
ye:i! one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six. 

„. x .... „„ LORING P. JORDAN’, 

(N ) f- 1 --S-m7 Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OE 
M VSSACJfl *KTTS 

Middlesex, ss. PRORA TE COURT 
To all persons Interested In the 
estate of 

Margaret Ellen Carey 

sometimes known as Margaret K. 
»'.u*y lute of Newton in said County, 

deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that John F. 
Carey of Newton In said County, lie 
appointed administrator of Kald 
tatc. without giving a surety on his 
bond. 

If you tii sire to obj< • thereto you 
or your attorney should hie written 
appcirat.ee it Haiti Court at Can.- 
bt idqe before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on the eighth da' of March 194$, 
th* return day of tin . iiatm.. 

witness. John «*. laggat. Esquire, 
F.i't Judge of s,.u| Coin, till* foui - 
trrnth tla v of February m the venr 
one thousand nine hundred and for"., 
six. 


<N) 


1 .OH INC 
f21-28-ni7 


P- JORDAN. 

liegikte r. 


< DM MON W I VI. I II OE 
M Vbb.VI HI M i l *» 

Middlesex, PROBATE COURT 

To all pm son* Intere-vd in the 
trust estate under the will of 
N alley lieu n Adams 
late of Newton in said Countv. d* • 
reused, for tile benefit o! Edward 
Manley Adam* and other- 

The trustee of said estate lias pre- 
aented to said Court for allowance 
Its sixth to thirteenth accounts, In- 
clusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on Hie fourth dav of Mar h 
1946. the return day of tills citation. 

Witness. John «' Leggat. Ea*|illi*. 
First Judge of said Court, this sixth 
lav of Feb i mi i s in the year one thou- 
sand nine iiundie.i ami fury-six 
LURIN'* P. JORDAN 

Register. 


THE NEWTON G1APHIC 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1946. 




Your RED CROSS 

must carry on! 


Salvation Army Officers 
Attend Convention 

— O — 

Forty Salvation Army Officers 
from various parts of the United 
States were delegates to the 
American Camping Association 
conference held last week at 
Hotel Statler, Boston. Major Wil- 
liam Trigg of New York City was 
Salvation Army conference presi- 
dent. 

Colonel Richard F. Stretton, 
Provincial Commander, remarked 
at the opening luncheon given 
Feb. 13 at The Salvation Army 
at South End Boys’ Club, that the 
fresh air camps owned and op- 
erated by The Salvation Army for 
disadvantaged children shbuld 
combine the spiritual aspects and 
aims of life with wholesome 
camping activities. Mrs. Colonel 
' Stretton told the group of the 
facilities at Camp Wonderland at 
Lake Massapoag, Sharon, where 
she is a superintendent and 
where a staff of 125 persons 
serve. 

i A film on the proposed camp 
at Holliston was exhibited by 
Prof. Charles Baird, C. E., of 
Northeastern University. He des- 
cribed the natural beauties af- 
forded at the spot and illustrated 
how the camp will be a model of 
sanitation. Following the movie, 
the meeting adjourned to the 
Statler. 

Among the subjects discussed 
by Salvationists were: “Creative 
Crafts.” “Religion in Camp,” "Re- 
port of 1944 Field Visits," “Camp 
Facilities," “Camp and the Rec- 
ords," "Statistical Records and 
Inventory Forms for Camp,” and 
"Individual Camper Records.” 


solos. Herb Bailey balances off 
the trio with his fiddle which be 
exercises with rare skill and rhy- 
thym — and with which he adds 
always a bit of frivolousness and 
fun. Angi D’Eugenio with which 
he adds always a bit of frivolous- 
ness ^nd fun. Angi D'Eugenio 
with t his guitar and soft voice 
completes a harmony that makes 
the "Melody Mustangs" some- 
thing to hear whenever one can 
find the opportunity to hear 
them. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSAC 11 1 >E TTS 

Middlesex, as. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of 

W 1 1 1 In m Hurrlson McLeod 
late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. z 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
Instrument purporting to he the last 
will of said deceased by Berta Han- 
son McLeod of Newton In said 
County, praying that she t,.;. appointed 
executrix thereof, without giving a 
surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
| or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In said Court at Cam- 
' bridge before ten o' cl >ck m the fore- 
j noon on the thirteenth day of March 
1946. the return day . .f this citation. 

I Witness, John f\ l.eggat, Esquire, 
First Judge of -aid Court, this four- 
teenth day of February in the year 
lone thousand nine hundred and forty - 
I six. 

BORING P. JORDAN*. 

| (N) f21-28-m7 «, 

COMMON WI M ill OF 
M \SSACHIMI TS 

Middlesex, ?s. PROBATE COURT 

To al! pcr»on« Interested In the 
estate of 

Slgnp J. Olson 

late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition lias been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
Instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said decerned by Christian J. 
Bcrglund >-f Arlington in said County, 
praying that in* lie appointed execu- 
tor thereof, without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should fil*> a written 
appearance in said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ton i.Vl .. it in the fore- 
noon on the thirteenth day of March 
104*i. the return day of thin citation. 

Willies: . John «' l.eggat. Esquire, 
First judge of said Court, this six- 
teenth day of February in tin- year 
"tie thousand nine bundled and forly- 
six. 


Newton Citizens Support 
State's New Civilian 
Blood Service 

— O — 

"In spite of the bad weather, 
52 Newton citizens supported the 
State’s new Blood Bank Pro- 
gram,” says Mrs. C. Terry Col- 
lens, Chairman Blood Donors, 
Newton Red Cross. “We are 
grateful to all who gave their 
blood and to those volunteers 
who assisted in carrying out the 
work of the Mobile Unit. 

Volunteer workers are— Clini- 
cal Staff: Dr. Delilah Ricmer, 
Nurses: Miss Elizabeth White, 
MiS3 Valerie Belair, Mrs. Marion 
Orchard. Mrs. Bergit Smith; 
Technician, Mrs. Helen Macin- 
tosh: Blood Custodians and 
Truck Drivers, George Gates and 
Raymond Rourke. 

Red Cross Staff — Mrs. C. Ter- 
ry Collons, Chairman Blood Don- 
ors; Mrs. Dana Baird, Vice-Chair- 
man: Staff Assistants — Mrs. W. 
E. Miller, Mrs. Alfred L. Fclch, 
Miss Louise Jellerson, Mrs. M. 
E. Legnard; Nurses’ Aides — 
Mrs. A. Stephen Pierce. Mrs. Ken- 
neth Crafts, Mrs. Seymour Sil- 
ver, Mrs. John F. Wheelock, Mrs. 
Archie MacDonald. Mrs. Joseph 
MacDonald, Mrs. Bartlett Van- 
Note, Mrs. Lloyd B. Salt. Mrs. 
Henry S. Kimball. Mrs. Raymond 
Hunting. Mrs. Robert W. Moore, 
Jr.: Motor Corps. Mrs. D. Mor- 
ley Lodge. Mrs. Stanley Stedfast, 
Miss Olive Webster; Newton 
Hospital Gray Ladies— Mrs. E. 
M. Dempsey. Mrs. John Day, 
Mrs. Arthur Beale: Marine Hos- 
pital Gray Ladies— Mrs. Thomas 
Regan, Mrs. William Wilks. Mrs. 
E. W. Bartram, Mrs. G. Lennox 
Dowd: Canteen — Mrs Ernest H. 
McClure, Mrs. Erskine Gay. Mrs. 
Edmund Miller. Mrs. George 
Wyman. Miss Mary Furlong, 
Mrs. Wm. H. Banks, Jr., Mrs. 
Norman D. McCutchoon, Miss 
Katherine Harlow, Mrs. Louis 
Aronson, Mrs. Kenneth J. Waite, 
Mrs. Harry L. Walen, Mrs. Don- 
ald Baker, Mrs. H. J. Peratsakis. 
„..rs.Vy , 

Because Newton participated 
in the State Blood Donor Pro- 
gram it is now possible for any 
Newton citizen who needs plas- 
ma in any part of the country 
to have it, and the State will re- 
place any blood used. . 


Brown Named 
Salesmanager of 
Electronics Division 

— o — 

Irving C. Brown has been ap- 
pointed sales manager of Indus- 
trial Electronics Division, Ray- 
theon Manufacturing Co., Wal- 
tham, Mass., It was announced 
yesterday by John M. Cage, man- 
ager of the division. 

Before joining Raytheon, Mr. 
Brown was sales manager of 
Thomson-Gibb Electric Welding 
Co., Lynn, Mass., manufactur- 
ers of resistance welding equip- 
ment. Mr. Brown had charge 
of four district offices as 
well as the home office and sales 
agents throughout the United 
States and Canada and also sup- 
ervised all advertising, sales pro- 
motion and service activities. 

During the 14 years prior to 
his association with Thompson- 
Gibb, Mr. Brown represented 
Rolls-Royce of America, Inc., in 
the New York area, and for sev- 
eral years was the leader in sales 
volume among 65 salesmen. 

Mr. Brown is a native of New 
Hampshire. Upon graduation 
from Wesleyan University, B. A. 
degree 1919, he joined the experi- 
mental department of the Edison 
Storage Battery Co., West 
Orange, N. J.; later he was sent 
by them as a sales and service 
representative in the Cleveland 
office and from there to Spring- 
field, Mass., where one of his 
customers was the Cowan Truck 
Co., of Holyoke. He joined this 
company as a salesman and went 
from there to Rolls-Royce. 


Red Ctou Home Service 
Answer* Appeal for Help 

— O — 

Trouble is no respecter of per- 
sons and often strikes at the 
most inopportune time. Part of 
the Red Cross Home Service re- 
sponsibility is to be ready to 
assist families of men in service 
when tragedy besets them. 

Not long ago a Newton service- 
I man, returning from a long tour 
of active duty in the Pacific joy- 
fully telephoned his family at 
I port of entry saying he would 
soon be on his way to a separa- 
I tion center and then home for 
good. In the separation process 
I there is a time that servicemen 
j are in transit and unable to com- 
; municate regularly with their 
family. While our soldier was 
in this process, the father was 
stricken with a sudden illness, 
the outcome of which was un- 
certain. The family turned to 
Home Service with the urgent 
plea to locate the serviceman if 
possible and hasten his return 
home. Immediately Home Ser- 
vice , telephoned the Red Cross 
Field Director at the port of en- 
try giving him full details of 
the situation and the physician’s 
recommendation that the service- 
man be sent home as soon as 
possible. From the “military au- 
thorities the Field Director was 
able to obtain Information 
garding the soldier’s travel 
schedule and time of arrival at 
the separation center. Home 
service then telephoned the Field 
Director at the Separation Cen- 
ter and again gave complete in- 
formation regarding the situa- 
tion. The Field Director met 
the serviceman on arrival, 
plained to him the family situa- 


tion and assisted him In request- 
ting his Commanding Officer for 
an emergency furlough and saw 
him off on the first tr&in for 
home. 

The soldier arrived at his fa- 
ther's bedside amt stayed with 
him until the critical period of 
his illness had passed and he 
was on the road to recovery. The 
soldier was then free to return 
to the separation center and re- 
ceive his honorable discharge so 
well earned. 

This is the kind of service New- 
ton Red Cross gives. Your con- 
tribution will insure its carry- 
ing on. 


Commander American Legion 
John W'alsh, Frank Tanner, Nell 
Cronin, Director of Claims, Colo- 
nel Thomas Quinn in charge Vet- 
erans Bureau, New Hampshire, 
Kenneth S. Croft, Acting Deputy 
Administrator, Frederick Shea, 


manager 1 New England Area, 
John Goggin, Congresswoman 
Edith Nourse Rogers, James 
Doyle, Connie Burke, Claims Divi- 
sion, Alfred Doucette, Harry 
Rising and Robert Frazier, Pub* 
lie Relations Officer. 


Tribute Paid 
Adelbeit D. Hiller 


Funeral services for Adelbert 
D. Hiller, 52, Administrator in 
charge of Veterans Ad mi rife t ra- 
tion Activities for New England 
and former executive assistant 
to Brigadier General Frank T. 
Hines head of the Veterans Ad- 
ministration, who died Wednes- 
day. February 20, 1946, were held 
Friday, February 22, at the First 
Baptist Church, Newton Centre. 
Officiating in the service which 
was followed by military ser- 
vices at the Newton Cemetery 
was the Rev. Lawrence D. Som- 
ers, pastor of the Marion Con- 
gregation Church, who was as- 
sisted by the Rev. Charles N. Ar- 
buckle, pastor of the Newton 
Church. 

Newton Post No. 48 American 
Legion conducted military hon- 
ors at the cemetery. 

Many former associates at- 
tended the services from the Bos- 
ton Veterans’ Bureau. Pe -t State 


You’ve Been at His Side 


■CROM Pearl Harbor to Tokyo 
-** you kept the Red Cross at his 
side. He still needs you . . . needs 
your Red Cross to help banish 
the loneliness he 
faces in faraway 
lands overseas. 


your Red Cross 

MUST CARRY ON 


GIVE! 


.This advertisement is con- 
tributed to the Red Cross by 

NEWTON’S 

The Fashion Centre of Neivton 
843 BEACON STREET 
NEWTON CENTRE 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. PROBATE COURT 
To all persons Interested in the 
estate of 

John S. Lester 

late of Providence in the State of 
Rhode Island deceased, leaving estate 
in "ti<l County of Middlesex. 

A petition has been presented to 
Mi'l ''"urt. praying thqt David F. 
I | ":in*-llv of Cranston In the State of 
Rhode Island be appointed adminis- 
trator of said estate, without gi\ing 
a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearan-e In said Court at Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon on the fourtn day of March 
l?4t. the return day of this citation. 

Witness. John ' Loggat. Esquire. 
First Judge of said f'ourt. this eighth 
day of Februnrv In the year one thou- 
sand nine hundred and fortv-six. 

LURING p. JORDAN. 

(N) f 1 4-2I-2S Register. 


COMMONWEALTH OF 
M \ SS A < II I SETTS 

Middlesex. • PROBATE COURT 

To all persons Interested In the 
i estate of 

Henry de Montlguy 

la’e of Newton in aid County, de- 
: ceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
1 tid t 'ourt for- probate of a certain 
j Hu trument purporting to he the last 
will of said deceased by Rosalida du 
; Montigr \ .q Newton In said County, 
i praying that she be appointed execu- 
i trix thereof, without giving a surety 
on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
I or your attorney should file a written 
appearance In said Court ftt Cam- 
bridge before ten o'clock In the fore- 
noon on the fifth day of March 1946, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Loggat. Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this twelfth 
I day of February In the year one thou- 
I sand nine hundred and forty-Mx. 

LURING P. JORDAN. 
\(S) fH-21-2S R* g; 'er. 


Robinson 
said County, «le 


You'll be okay. Soldier ! 


H, 


I IGH UP on the crowded deck of a hospital 
ship, a homesick Yank strains his eyes for a sign of home. 
On the dock below he sees a Red Cross Motor' Corps 
driver. At the sight of her heart-warming smile, without 
even hearing her voice, he knows she’s saying: 

“You’ll be okay, Soldier!" 

He knows, because he’s heard other Red Cross girls say 
those same simple words of cheer. On Luzon. In the 
hospital. On the dock where he took ship for home. 
Aboard the hospital ship, from a sympathetic and under- 
standing Red Cross worker. 

He knows that they are not mere words, for he has 
seen the help and the service that inspire them. He knows, 
too, that he can find the same spirit of friendly, under- 
standing helpfulness in his home town Red Cross chapter. 

Yes, he knows that the Red Cross network of assistance 
is at his side whenever he needs it, ready and able to meet 
his needs. 

And while this girl and her comrades throughout the 
world represent the Red Cross, in reality you are the Red 
Cross. She, the Red Cross worker, is still needed, and she’s 
on duty today where American troops are stationed. You 
who make the Red Cross possible also are still needed. 
Without you there would be no Red Cross. 

So let your dollars follow your heart. Give to the Red 
Cross. Give all you possibly can. „ 


A petition bus be*'ii pretented to 
I Mild Court for probate of a certain 
i instrument purporting m be the l.mt 
will of r.,iq deceased by Malcolm A. 
| Warren < f Newton In ruld County, 
( praying that he ho appointed ex* • li- 
ter thereof, without giving it surety 
on hi* bond 

i If you di-siie to object thereto you 
i or yuur attorney should file a written 
I appearance in suld Court at Cam- 
bridge In L ie ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon tin the folllln day of Mat* It 1916, 
i the return day of this citation. 

Witness*. John C. l.eggat i. quit*'. 


• a Id Cou i of a 

Instrument purporting to he the last 
Will of said dcea *1 l.v Mary 
Coidello of Newton in wild County, 
praying that ti* he qipninted execu- 
trix thetf f. without giving a surety 
on her bond. 

If you i|< sire to object thereto you 
or y.iir attorney should file a written 
apt" •• in said Court at I'nn- 
hri'lg* I.* f. i e t« n o'clock In Die fom- 
' ■ - the fourth day or March 191$. 
the i* turn day of this citation. 

Wit n* • John c. I .egg'it. Inquire, 


This Advertisement is Sponsored by 

DOELCAM COMPANY 

WEST NEWTON 


First Judge ,.f .;.J • ».il I th..- I- • Judge of '.H '• Ult. till - 
eleventh dav of Febru.iiv m the '*.*r ■ * < <ii day of February In the year 
■ ns thousand runs hundred and f « ■ i ' ' thousand nine hundred and forty- 

gig. "ix. 

LURIN' 4 P. JORDAN I LURING F. JORDAN 

(N ) f 14-31 -2** Register. (N) fl4-21-3S Register. 


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Prepared by the Adi er tiling Council in Cooperation uitb the American Red Cross 


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IN i M4-J1-H